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 #include<stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
   static int i=i++, j=j++, k=k++;
   printf("i = %d j = %d k = %d", i, j, k);
   return 0;
}

Output in Turbo C 4.5 :

i = 0 j = 0 k = 0

In gcc I'm getting the error:

Initializer element is not constant

Which one is logically correct ? I'm in bit confusion..

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1  
Its very clear that nobody should ever use Turbo C again. Just saying. –  Ruel Oct 11 '10 at 13:14
1  
Or int i=i++. –  Ken Oct 11 '10 at 14:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Standard says about initialization (6.7.8):

4   All the expressions in an initializer for an object that has static storage duration shall be constant expressions or string literals.

(That's from C99, but C89 says almost exactly the same thing.)

So it looks as though GCC is more correct than 15-year old abandonware. (Who'd a thunk it?)

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1  
+1 for the last sentence. –  Ruel Oct 11 '10 at 13:22
1  
+1 for the reference –  ThR37 Oct 11 '10 at 13:32
1  
+2 for the reference & +1 for best answer –  Aboelnour Oct 11 '10 at 13:40
    
+1 for the ref. –  Prof. Falken Oct 11 '10 at 14:09

I know this is not an answer, but still, why use a complex example for the test?

Okay, let's simplify everything:

#include<stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
   static int i;
   printf("i = %d", i);
   return 0;
}

Output:

i = 0

But what if... ?

 #include<stdio.h>
 int main(void)
{
   static int i=i;
   printf("i = %d", i);
   return 0;
}

Output:

prog.c: In function ‘main’:
prog.c:4: error: initializer element is not constant
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GCC is correct here.

static variables are initialised (at program load time) to the value specified in the initialiser (or to 0 if no initialiser was given). As this initialisation happens before the program is started, initialisers for static variables must be compile-time constants. An expression containing the ++ operator is clearly not a constant expression.

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I would guess GCC is correct here. An initializer should not be a variable. You try to initialize a variable with itself, before it is defined.

I guess Turbo C "reasons", that i is after all static variable, and hence should have value zero (as all static variables have default), then goes on to ignore the ++ operation.

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1  
Static variables are automatically initialised to 0. –  Parikshit Oct 11 '10 at 13:00
    
@Parixit, oops i missed that keyword. –  Prof. Falken Oct 11 '10 at 13:04

buddy u havent initialized the variables and u r incrementing them, as u have not initialized any variable it will take garbage value and i dont think so incrementing any garbage value is the correct thing to do. So please first initialize the variables and then increment them. U will get the correct answer.

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1  
Hey ..I think u missed the static keyword.. –  Parikshit Oct 11 '10 at 13:16

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