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Server shutdown from power failure.
Mysql will not start now.
Disk is not full. Syslog is below

Oct 11 15:03:31 joe mysqld_safe[24757]: started
Oct 11 15:03:31 joe mysqld[24760]: 101011 15:03:31  InnoDB: Operating system error number 13 in a file operation.
Oct 11 15:03:31 joe mysqld[24760]: InnoDB: The error means mysqld does not have the access rights to
Oct 11 15:03:31 joe mysqld[24760]: InnoDB: the directory.
Oct 11 15:03:31 joe mysqld[24760]: InnoDB: File name ./ibdata1
Oct 11 15:03:31 joe mysqld[24760]: InnoDB: File operation call: 'create'.
Oct 11 15:03:31 joe mysqld[24760]: InnoDB: Cannot continue operation.
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1  
Checked permissions for ibdata1 I assume? In /var/lib/mysql on debian and its derivatives i think –  Alexander Sagen Oct 11 '10 at 15:36
    
Yea nothing has changed. Permissions are owned by mysql. The file must be corrupt. It is the only thing I can think of at this point. –  eat_a_lemon Oct 11 '10 at 17:14

12 Answers 12

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The file is not corrupt. You can find out the source of these errors with 'perror'. i.e.

toaster:~ morgo$ perror 13
OS error code  13:  Permission denied

InnoDB has corruption detection (page checksums) and would happily tell you if that were the problem.

Either the directory permissions have changed, or your my.cnf file has been hosed, and it's trying to recreate data files somewhere else.

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Ok, so how can I set the correct permission for this file? –  dombesz Oct 13 '11 at 10:29
3  
It's more likely an incorrect user/group than it is r/w. From the official INSTALL-BINARY: shell> chown -R mysql . shell> chgrp -R mysql . shell> scripts/mysql_install_db --user=mysql # remove this step. shell> chown -R root . shell> chown -R mysql data –  Morgan Tocker Oct 13 '11 at 13:44

If you are using ubuntu or apparmor you should permit this change in apparmor.

Edit /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.mysqld and change /var/lib/mysql with the new DATADIR.

It should work.

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6  
Thanks. This definitely deserves more upvotes. –  Thomas Jungblut Mar 22 '13 at 16:41
    
+1, I'd missed the ending / on the new directory in this file. –  RyanfaeScotland Oct 3 '13 at 9:56
    
Thanks. The directories in apparmor conf may not be symlinks and command "service apparmor restart" was also needed. –  Torben Nov 20 '13 at 8:13
    
Had the same problem as the author, but using CentOS. This answer saved me. Disabling selinux solved the issue. –  facha Jan 16 '14 at 15:16
    
Ubuntu 13.10, saved my day. Don't have SELinux installed, but do have apparmor. Thanks! –  dadooda Mar 12 '14 at 18:48

Error:

101130 14:42:51 mysqld_safe mysqld from pid file /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid ended
101130 18:07:58 mysqld_safe Starting mysqld daemon with databases from /var/lib/mysql
101130 18:07:58  InnoDB: Operating system error number 13 in a file operation.
InnoDB: The error means mysqld does not have the access rights to
InnoDB: the directory.
InnoDB: File name ./ibdata1
InnoDB: File operation call: 'open'.
InnoDB: Cannot continue operation.

Solution SeLinux SeLinux security:

[root@localhost ~]# service mysqld restart
Deteniendo mysqld:                                         [  OK  ]
Iniciando mysqld:                                          [  FALLÓ  ]
[root@localhost ~]#  restorecon -R /var/lib/mysql/
[root@localhost ~]# service mysqld restart
Deteniendo mysqld:                                         [  OK  ]
Iniciando mysqld:                                          [  OK  ]
[root@localhost ~]#
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I just disabled selinux at the machine and the problem disappeared. Thanks for pointing me to right direction! –  andrej Mar 25 '12 at 22:20
    
Thanks for your help –  Yu Jing Sep 17 '14 at 0:44
    
thanks! restorecon worked for me –  Felipe Balduino Jan 12 at 13:45

For me, restoring the security context (selinux) did the trick

restorecon -R /var/lib/mysql/

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I had exactly the same problem on my CentOS box. After moving mysql data directory around I couldn't start the service anymore, even as I had copied the files with the same owner and permissions.

I had a problem with the SELinux security context. If you run your CentOS stock it has good chance to be enabled and won't let do what you want with MySQL. To fix this :

First compare the old dir and new dir using

ls -Z /var/lib/mysql 

and

ls -Z /new/mysql/dir

If you see any difference it's likely to be your problem. To modify this :

chcon -R --type=mysql_db_t /new/mysql/dir

The -R switch is for recursion. If you only need to change one file you can omit it. If your context is different than mine(maybe a different distro), use the one indicated by the output of the first (it should be the 3rd field of the SELinux stuff)

ls -Z /var/lib/mysql 
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When this popped up for me, I found the answer in the /etc/mysql/my.cnf configuration file. The datadir line did not point to the var/lib/mysql directory (where the databases are). Once I put this path in, the server restarted no problem.

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please check this:

chown -R mysql:mysql /var/lib/mysql
share|improve this answer

I had exactly the same problem on my CentOS box. After moving mysql data directory around I couldn't start the service anymore, even as I had copied the files with the same owner and permissions.

I had a problem with the SELinux security context. If you run your CentOS stock it has good chance to be enabled and won't let do what you want with MySQL. To fix this :

First compare the old dir and new dir using

ls -Z /var/lib/mysql 

and

ls -Z /new/mysql/dir

If you see any difference it's likely to be your problem. To modify this :

chcon -R --type=mysql_db_t /new/mysql/dir

The -R switch is for recursion. If you only need to change one file you can omit it.

share|improve this answer

In my siuation is Selinux's problem. And the
chcon -R --type=mysql_db_t /new/mysql/dir comes error:
chcon: failed to change context of /new/mysql/dir to root:object_r:mysql_db_t: Invalid argument.
So i use the command:chcon -R root:object_r:mysqld_db_t /new/mysql/dir.

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If you have this problem on a Synology NAS you can fix it by following the advice of the Synology support team:

Dear User,

This has been confirmed as a known issue and we will try to fix this issue in further MariaDB release. Sorry for your inconvenience.

Here is the workaround:

  • Please try to telnet to your DS with "root" account and password (same as admin's)
  • run the command "echo 1 > /var/services/mysql/VERSION"
  • open MariaDB package from DSM will trigger update again
  • type in the DB password and click Update will fix this issue

More info: Synology forum

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In short, (especially on RHEL/CentOS/Fedora) try

getenforce

if it replies with Enforcing you have SELinux up and running. Temporarily deactivate it with setenforce 0 and see if MariaDB starts now! Rather common, especially on RHEL/CentOS/Fedora.

There's more about this further down, as well as in this official article.

In general

There are more things in a UNIX environment that might prevent file access, than just user access rights.

  • Security modules like SELinux (see above) or AppArmor (as Dan mentioned) could disallow it
  • Access Control Lists (ACL) could be specifically set, for the required files/directories
  • Any of the parent folders could be owned by another user, and have no x (="dir access") set for others

Additionally there could be other unexpected factors, like ...

  • The mysql datadir being set to a place, where mysql doesn't have permissions (see /etc/my.cnf)
  • Mysql could (strangely) be running as a different user, or the file could be simply owned by someone else

Just to mention a view things off the top of my head (feel free to edit/add to this answer btw).

In the case, SELinux is "the problem"

For a permanent solution, you could try to restore the appropriate security context, ...

restorecon -R /var/lib/mysql/

... or just deactivate SELinux (but think about this one a little bit before doing so), by editing the config (typically in /etc/selinux/config) and setting SELINUX=disabled as suggested in following article.

Obviously those are applicable to MySQL just the same way.

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I had the same problem. Did alot of research and found out this solution. You need to run this command on ibdata1 sudo shadowprotect -u root | root

I dont know what this does.. but it worked for me.

Good luck.

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4  
You should refrain from adding solutions when you dont know what they do. You could be asking people to perform operations that cause system damage. –  Christian Aug 29 '12 at 0:34

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