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The Challenge

The shortest code by character count that will output the Morris Number Sequence. The Morris Number Sequence, also known as the Look-and-say sequence is a sequence of numbers that starts as follows:

1, 11, 21, 1211, 111221, 312211, ...

You can generate the sequence infinitely (i.e, you don't have to generate a specific number).

I/O Expectations

The program doesn't need to take any input (but bonus points for accepting input and thereby providing the option to start from any arbitrary starting point or number). At the very least your program must start from 1.

Output is at the very least expected to be the sequence:

1
11
21
1211
111221
312211
...

Extra Credit

If you're going for extra credit, you would need to do something like this:

$ morris 1
1
11
21
1211
111221
312211
...

$ morris 3
3
13
1113
3113
132113
...
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by George Stocker May 22 at 15:47

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What is the input and output expectation? Single value, single output? Specific number of iterations? –  Mike Clark Oct 11 '10 at 17:35
1  
I think it's more clear if you replace "indefinitely" (vague, unclear) by "infinitely" (endless, no borders). As to the closers: get used to it. code-golf questions are a gray area in SO. –  BalusC Oct 11 '10 at 18:10
3  
Should the output be [13,1113,3113...] or [3,13,1113,3113...]? –  Instantsoup Oct 11 '10 at 18:37
6  
@Nakilon I guess the numerous different ways of doing it (below) doesn't mean that there is more than one way to do it. Thank you for your wonderful insight. –  Vivin Paliath Oct 13 '10 at 15:50

41 Answers 41

up vote 15 down vote accepted

GolfScript - 41 (extra credit: 40)

1{.p`n+0:c:P;{:|P=c{c`P|:P!}if):c;}%~1}do
{~.p`n+0:c:P;{:|P=c{c`P|:P!}if):c;}%1}do

What?
The procedure for getting the next number in the sequence: Convert the current number to a string, append a newline and loop over the characters. For each digit, if the previous digit P is the same, increment the counter c. Otherwise, add c and P to what will be next number, then update these variables. The newline we append allows the last group of digits to be added to the next number.

The exact details can be obtained examining the GolfScript documentation. (Note that | is used as a variable.)

share|improve this answer
17  
I find it amusing that the extra credit makes it shorter. –  Brian Oct 12 '10 at 20:06
2  
@Michael I added a brief description of the algorithm, but you'll have to refer to gs documentation if you want to understand what exactly is happening (luckily the code is only 41 characters). –  Nabb Oct 13 '10 at 16:27

Perl (46 characters)

$_="1$/";s/(.)\1*/length($&).$1/eg while print

Extra Credit (52 characters)

$_=(pop||1).$/;s/(.)\1*/length($&).$1/eg while print
share|improve this answer
3  
I think -l usually costs three characters. –  Nabb Oct 12 '10 at 7:52

Haskell: 115 88 85

import List
m x=do a:b<-group x;show(length b+1)++[a]
main=mapM putStrLn$iterate m"1"

This is the infinite sequence. I know it can be improved a lot - I'm fairly new to Haskell.

Bit shorter, inlining mapM and iterate:

import List
m(a:b)=show(length b+1)++[a]
f x=putStrLn x>>f(group x>>=m)
main=f"1"
share|improve this answer

Perl, 46 characters

$_=1;s/(.)\1*/$&=~y!!!c.$1/ge while print$_,$/

Extra credit, 51 characters:

$_=pop||1;s/(.)\1*/$&=~y!!!c.$1/ge while print$_,$/
share|improve this answer

Javascript 100 97

for(x=prompt();confirm(y=x);)for(x="";y;){for(c=0;y[c++]&&y[c]==y[0];);x+=c+y[0];y=y.substr(c--)}

Allows interrupting the sequence (by clicking "Cancel") so we don't lock the user-agent and peg the CPU. It also allows starting from any positive integer (extra credit).

Live Example: http://jsbin.com/izeqo/2

share|improve this answer

Mathematica - 62 53 50 chars - Extra credit included

Edit: 40 chars ... but right to left :(

Curiously if we read the sequence right to left (i.e. 1,11,12,1121, ..), 40 chars is enough

NestList[Flatten[Tally /@ Split@#] &, #2, #] &

That is because Tally generates a list {elem,counter} !

Edit: 50 chars

NestList[Flatten@Reverse[Tally /@ Split@#, 3] &, #2, #] &

Dissection: (read comments upwards)

NestList[               // 5-Recursively get the first N iterations
    Flatten@            // 4-Convert to one big list
       Reverse          // 3-Reverse to get {counter,element}
          [Tally /@     // 2-Count each run (generates {element,counter})
               Split@#, // 1-Split list in runs of equal elements
                 3] &,
                     #2,// Input param: Starting Number 
                     #] // Input param: Number of iterations

Edit: refactored

NestList[Flatten[{Length@#, #[[1]]} & /@ Split@#, 1] &, #2, #1] &

End edit ///

NestList[Flatten@Riffle[Length /@ (c = Split@#), First /@ c] &, #2, #1] &

Spaces not needed / added for clarity

Invoke with

%[NumberOfRuns,{Seed}]

My first time using "Riffle", to combine {1,2,3} and {a,b,c} into {1,a,2,b,3,c} :)

share|improve this answer

Here's my C# attempt using LINQ and first attempt at Code Golf:

C# - 205 194 211 198 bytes with extra credit (including C# boilerplate)

using System.Linq;class C{static void Main(string[]a){var v=a[0];for(;;){var r="";while(v!=""){int i=v.TakeWhile(d=>d==v[0]).Count();r+=i;r+=v[0];v=v.Remove(0,i);}System.Console.WriteLine(r);v=r;}}}

Readable version:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string value = args[0];
    for (;;)
    {
        string result = "";
        while (value != "")
        {
            int i = value.TakeWhile(d => d == value[0]).Count();
            result += i;
            result += value[0];
            value = value.Remove(0, i);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(result);
        value = result;
    }
}

Sample output:

11
21
1211
111221
312211
13112221
1113213211
...
share|improve this answer
2  
Renaming the args parameter will save you another 6 characters. –  0xA3 Oct 12 '10 at 18:32

Python, 97 102 115

Whitespace is supposed to be tabs:

x='1'
while 1:
    print x;y=d=''
    for c in x+'_':
        if c!=d:
            if d:y+=`n`+d
            n,d=0,c
        n+=1
    x=y

E.g.:

$ python morris.py | head
1
11
21
1211
111221
312211
13112221
1113213211
31131211131221
13211311123113112211
share|improve this answer
1  
Cut characters by putting statements on the same line when possible. You can change a few newline/tab combinations to just a semicolon. It's especially useful if you can do it in deeply indented lines. –  Chris Lutz Oct 11 '10 at 23:45
3  
@phkahler Tabs and spaces are both one character each. Alternating space / tab / space+tab though will save a few characters though. –  Nabb Oct 13 '10 at 11:38

Perl, 67 characters

including -l flag.

sub f{$_=pop;print;my$n;$n.=$+[0].$1while(s/(.)\1*//);f($n)}f(1)

Perl, 72 characters with extra credit

sub f{$_=pop;print;my$n;$n.=$+[0].$1while(s/(.)\1*//);f($n)}f(pop||1)
share|improve this answer

Here goes my implementation (in Prolog):

Prolog with DCGs (174 chars):

m(D):-write(D),nl,m(1,write(D),T,[nl|T],_).
m(C,D,T)-->[D],{succ(C,N)},!,m(N,D,T).
m(C,D,[G,D|T])-->[N],{G=write(C),G,D,(N=nl->(M-T-O=0-[N|R]-_,N);M-T-O=1-R-N)},!,m(M,O,R).

Plain vanilla prolog, code much more readeable (225 chars):

m(D):-
  ((D=1->write(D),nl);true),
  m([], [1,D]).

m([], [C,D|M]):-
  write(C), write(D),nl,
  reverse([D,C|M],[N|X]),
  !,
  m([N|X],[0,N]).
m([D|T], [C,D|M]):-
  succ(C,N),
  !,
  m(T,[N,D|M]).
m([Y|T],[C,D|M]):-
  write(C), write(D),
  !,
  m(T,[1,Y,D,C|M]).

To output the Morris sequence: m(D). where D is the 'starting' digit.

share|improve this answer
4  
I was going to up vote but I hate prolog so much I just couldn't do it. –  rerun Oct 11 '10 at 23:17

Ruby — 52

s=?1;loop{puts s;s.gsub!(/(.)\1*/){"#{$&.size}"+$1}}

Task is too simple, and too perlish...

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C, 128 characters

uses a static buffer, guaranteed to cause segmentation fault

main(){char*c,v[4096],*o,*b,d[4096]="1";for(;o=v,puts(d);strcpy(d,v))for(c=d;*c;o+=sprintf(o,"%d%c",c-b,*b))for(b=c;*++c==*b;);}
share|improve this answer

Call a string "Morris-ish" if it contains nothing but digits 1-3, and does not contain any runs of more than three of a digit. If the initial string is Morris-ish, all strings iteratively generated from it will likewise be Morris-ish. Likewise, if the initial string is not Morris-ish then no generated string will be Morris-ish unless numbers greater than ten are regarded as combinations of digits (e.g. if 11111111111 is regarded as collapsing into three ones, rather than an "eleven" and a one).

Given that observation, every iteration starting with a Morris-ish seed can be done as the following sequence of find/replace operations:

111 -> CA
11 -> BA
1 -> AA
222 -> CB
22 -> BB
2 -> AB
333 -> CC
33 -> BC
3 -> AC
A -> 1
B -> 2
C -> 3

Note that a sequence is Morris-ish before the above substitution, the second character of each generated pair will be different from the second character of the preceding and following pairs; it is thus not possible to have more than three identical characters in sequence.

I wonder how many disjoint Morris-ish sequences there are?

share|improve this answer
4  
There are countably infinitely many. Let M be the set of Morris-ish strings and let f:M->M be the "say-what-you-see" function that iteratively generates the Morris sequence. Observe that if m is an element of M, then f(m) has even length. Thus the string 1212121...1, in which there are n 1s and n-1 2s for some nonnegative n, is the beginning of a Morris-ish sequence (it is not f(m) for any m). This gives countably infinitely many startpoints for Morris-ish sequences; that the sequences are disjoint only requires that f be injective, which is straightforwardly true. –  Hammerite Oct 12 '10 at 14:44

Perl (extra credit), 47 chars

$_=pop.$/;{print;s/(.)\1*/$&=~y|||c.$1/ge;redo}
share|improve this answer

Java

My first attempt at a 'Code-Golf' I just threw this together during part of my IB CS class:

238 condensed

Condensed:

String a="1",b="1",z;int i,c;while(true){System.out.println(b);for(c=0,i=0,b="",z=a.substring(0,1);i<a.length();i++){if(z.equals(a.substring(i,i+1)))c++;else{b+=Integer.toString(c)+z;z=a.substring(i,i+1);c=1;}}b+=Integer.toString(c)+z;a=b;}

Properly formatted:

    String a = "1", b = "1", z;
    int i, c;

    while (true) {      
      System.out.println(b);

      for (c = 0, i = 0, b = "", z = a.substring(0, 1); i < a.length(); i++) {
        if (z.equals(a.substring(i, i + 1))) c++;
        else {
          b += Integer.toString(c) + z;
          z = a.substring(i, i + 1);
          c = 1;
        }
      }

      b += Integer.toString(c) + z;
      a = b;
    }
share|improve this answer
8  
Please explore other topics tagged code-golf to learn what they meant with "code-golf". –  BalusC Oct 11 '10 at 18:30
3  
I feel the comment by BalusC might be a little harsh: this solution isn't half bad (code golfing in Java is hard) although it probably could be made shorter.... –  ChristopheD Oct 14 '10 at 5:19
1  
@ChristopheD: the OP edited the answer afterwards :) Check edit history for the original answer. All variables are full out written and whitespace is kept. How Golfy was that? Anyway, for a shorter solution, see my answer. –  BalusC Oct 14 '10 at 17:44

J, 44 characters with extra credit

(([:,#;.1@{:,.{:#{.)@(,:0<1,[:|2-/\]))^:(<9)

Unfortunately this only generates 9 iterations, but the iteration count <9 can be tweaked to be anything. Setting it to a: generates an infinite sequence but obviously this can't be printed.

Usage:

   (([:,#;.1@{:,.{:#{.)@(,:0<1,[:|2-/\]))^:(<9) 1
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 3 1 1 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 1 0 0 0 0
3 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 3 1 2 2 1

   (([:,#;.1@{:,.{:#{.)@(,:0<1,[:|2-/\]))^:(<11) 4
4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 3 2 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 3 1 2 2 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 1 1 3 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 3 2 1 1 3 2 1 3 2 2 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 1 3 1 2 2 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 3 2 2 2 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 1 1 3 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 3 1 1 1 2 3 1 1 3 3 2 2 1 1 4 0 0 0 0
1 3 2 1 1 3 2 1 3 2 2 1 1 3 3 1 1 2 1 3 2 1 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 4
share|improve this answer
2  
That's the longest J code I've ever seen! Sheesh, can't this language be made more terse? –  fbrereto Oct 13 '10 at 18:21

Java - 167 chars (with credit)

(122 without class/main boilerplate)


class M{public static void main(String[]a){for(String i=a[0],o="";;System.out.println(i=o),o="")for(String p:i.split("(?<=(.)(?!\\1))"))o+=p.length()+""+p.charAt(0);}}

With newlines:

class M{
 public static void main(String[]a){
  for(String i=a[0],o="";;System.out.println(i=o),o="")
   for(String p:i.split("(?<=(.)(?!\\1))"))
    o+=p.length()+""+p.charAt(0);
 }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I would of never thought to use a for loop like that –  TheLQ Oct 17 '10 at 19:13

Delphi

Delphi is a terrible golfing language, but still:

var i,n:Int32;s,t,k:string;u:char;label l;begin s:='1';l:writeln(s);t:='';u:=s[1
];n:=1;for i:=2to length(s)do if s[i]=u then inc(n)else begin str(n,k);t:=t+k+u;
u:=s[i];n:=1;end;str(n,k);t:=t+k+u;s:=t;goto l;end.

This is 211 bytes (and it compiles as it stands).

share|improve this answer

PHP: 111

My first attempt ever on a code golf, quite happy with the result.

for($x=1;;){echo$y=$x,"\n";for($x="";$y;){for($c=0;$y[$c++]&&$y[$c]==$y[0];);$x.=$c.$y[0];$y=substr($y,$c--);}}

Gives:

> php htdocs/golf.php
1
11
21
... (endless loop)

PHP with extra credit: 118

for($x=$argv[1];;){echo$y=$x,"\n";for($x="";$y;){for($c=0;$y[$c++]&&$y[$c]==$y[0];);$x.=$c.$y[0];$y=substr($y,$c--);}}

Gives:

> php htdocs/golf.php 4
4
14
1114
3114
... (to infinity and beyond)
share|improve this answer
1  
I just noticed your counts don't include the opening <?php tag (mine do)... –  BoltClock Oct 12 '10 at 19:43

Python - 98 chars

from itertools import *
L='1'
while 1:print L;L=''.join('%s'%len(list(y))+x for x,y in groupby(L))

106 chars for the bonus

from itertools import *
L=raw_input()
while 1:print L;L=''.join('%s'%len(list(y))+x for x,y in groupby(L))
share|improve this answer

Here's my very first attempt at code golf, so please don't be too hard on me!

PHP, 128 122 112 bytes with opening tag

122 116 106 bytes without opening tag and leading whitespace.

<?php for($a="1";!$c="";print"$a\n",$a=$c)for($j=0,$x=1;$a[$j];++$j)$a[$j]==$a[$j+1]?$x++:($c.=$x.$a[$j])&&$x=1;

(Quite a pity I have to initialize $a as a string though, costing me 2 extra bytes, otherwise I can't use index notation on it.)

Output

$ php morris.php
1
11
21
1211
111221
312211
...

PHP (extra credit), 133 127 117 bytes with opening tag

127 121 111 bytes without opening <?php tag and leading whitespace.

<?php for($a=$argv[1];!$c="";print"$a\n",$a=$c)for($j=0,$x=1;$a[$j];++$j)$a[$j]==$a[$j+1]?$x++:($c.=$x.$a[$j])&&$x=1;

Output

$ php morris.php 3
3
13
1113
3113
132113
1113122113
...
^C
$ php morris.php 614
614
161114
11163114
3116132114
1321161113122114
1113122116311311222114
...

PHP (extra credit), ungolfed with opening and closing tags

<?php

for ($a = $argv[1]; !$c = ""; print "$a\n", $a = $c)
{
    for ($j = 0, $x = 1; $a[$j]; ++$j)
    {
        // NB: this was golfed using ternary and logical AND operators:
        // $a[$j] == $a[$j + 1] ? $x++ : ($c .= $x . $a[$j]) && $x = 1;
        if ($a[$j] == $a[$j + 1])
        {
            $x++;
        }
        else
        {
            $c .= $x . $a[$j];
            $x = 1;
        }
    }
}

?>
share|improve this answer
3  
@chigley: It just indicates an infinite loop. The blank expressions between the semicolons indicate to do nothing to control the loop — just let it run forever. It's like while(1), except 1 character shorter :) –  BoltClock Oct 11 '10 at 22:20
1  
@Harmen: I don't wanna get downvoted by short opening tag haters :P –  BoltClock Oct 12 '10 at 20:35

C++, 310 characters.

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
using namespace std;
int main(){list<int> l(1,1);cout<<1<<endl;while(1){list<int> t;for(list<int>::iterator i=l.begin();i!=l.end();){list<int>::iterator p=i;++i;while((i!=l.end())&&(*i==*p)){++i;}int c=distance(p,i);cout<<c<<*p;t.push_back(c);t.push_back(*p);}cout<<'\n';l=t;}}

Correctly indented:

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    list <int> l(1,1);
    cout << 1 << endl;
    while(1) {
        list <int> t;
        for (list <int>::iterator i = l.begin(); i != l.end();) {
            const list <int>::iterator p = i;
            ++i;
            while ((i != l.end()) && (*i == *p)) {
                ++i;
            }
            int c = distance(p, i);
            cout << c << *p;
            t.push_back(c);
            t.push_back(*p);
        }
        cout << '\n';
        l = t;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Python - 117

My python-fu is not strong, so I did a lot of googling for this. :)

a='1'
while 1:
 print a
 a=''.join([`len(s)`+s[0]for s in''.join([x+' '*(x!=y)for x,y in zip(a,(2*a)[1:])]).split()])

The idea is to use zip to generate a list of (a[i],a[i+1]) pairs, use the inner comprehension to insert a space when a[i]!=a[i+1], join the resulting list to a string, and split on spaces, use another comprehension on this split list to replace each element with the run length of the element, and the first character, and finally join to get the next value in sequence.

share|improve this answer

C w/ Extra Credit, 242 (or 184)

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define s malloc(1<<20)
main(int z,char**v){char*j=s,*k=s;strcpy(k,*++v);for(;;){strcpy(j,k);z=1;*k=0;while(*j){if(*j-*++j)sprintf(k+strlen(k),"%d%c",z,*(j-1)),z=1;else++z;}puts(k);}}

You can save another ~60 characters if you omit the includes, gcc will still compile with warnings.

$ ./a.out 11111111 | head
81
1811
111821
31181211
132118111221
1113122118312211
31131122211813112221
132113213221181113213211
111312211312111322211831131211131221
3113112221131112311332211813211311123113112211
share|improve this answer

C#, 204 bytes (256 with extra credit)

My first attempt at code golf

static void Main(){var v="1";for(;;){Console.Write(v + "\n");var r=v.Aggregate("", (x, y) => x.LastOrDefault()==y?x.Remove(0, x.Length-2)+(int.Parse(x[x.Length-2].ToString())+1).ToString()+y:x+="1"+y);v=r;}}

Readable version, the difference from others is that I use Linq's Aggregate function

static void Main(){
    var value="1";
    for(;;)
    {
        Console.Write(value + "\n");
        var result = value.Aggregate("", (seed, character) => 
                        seed.LastOrDefault() == character ? 
                            seed.Remove(seed.Length-2) + (int.Parse(seed[seed.Length-2].ToString())+1).ToString() + character
                            : seed += "1" + character
                    );
        value = result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Common Lisp - 124 122 115 Chars

(do((l'(1)(do(a r)((not l)r)(setf a(1+(mismatch(cdr l)l))r(,@r,a,(car l))l(nthcdr a l)))))((format t"~{~s~}~%"l)))

With formatting:

(do ((l '(1) (do (a r) ((not l) r) (setf a (1+ (mismatch (cdr l) l))
                                         r `(,@r ,a ,(car l)) l (nthcdr a l)))))
    ((format t "~{~s~}~%" l)))
share|improve this answer

F# - 135

let rec m l=Seq.iter(printf "%i")l;printfn"";m(List.foldBack(fun x s->match s with|c::v::t when x=v->(c+1)::v::t|_->1::x::s)l [])
m[1]

Formatted Code

let rec m l=
    Seq.iter(printf "%i")l;printfn"";
    m (List.foldBack(fun x s->
        match s with
        |c::v::t when x=v->(c+1)::v::t
        |_->1::x::s) l [])
m[1]

Still hopeful I can find a better way to print the list or use string/bigint instead.

share|improve this answer

PHP 72 bytes

<?for(;;)echo$a=preg_filter('#(.)\1*#e','strlen("$0"). $1',$a)?:5554,~õ;

This script might be further optmized. But since we've got at PHPGolf ({http://www.phpgolf.org/?p=challenges&challenge_id=28}) exactly the same sequence, I keep it this way.

share|improve this answer

Python - 92 characters

98 with extra credit

Outputs infinitely. I recommend redirecting output to a file, and quickly hitting Ctrl+C.

x=`1`;t=''
while 1:
 print x
 while x:c=x[0];n=len(x);x=x.lstrip(c);t+=`n-len(x)`+c
 x,t=t,x

For the extra credit version, replace

x=`1`

with

x=`input()`
share|improve this answer

C - 120 characters

129 with extra credit

main(){char*p,*s,*r,x[99]="1",t[99];for(;r=t,puts(p=x);strcpy(x,t))
for(;*p;*r++=p-s+48,*r++=*s,*r=0)for(s=p;*++p==*s;);}

The newline is there only for readability's sake.

This stops when it segfaults (after at least 15 iterations). If your C libraries use buffered I/O, then you may not see any output before the segfault. If so, test with this code:

#include<stdio.h>
main(){char*p,*s,*r,x[99]="1",t[99];for(;r=t,puts(p=x),fflush(stdout),1;
strcpy(x,t))for(;*p;*r++=p-s+48,*r++=*s,*r=0)for(s=p;*++p==*s;);}

This adds an fflush after every output.

Ungolfed, it would look something like this:

int main(){
    char *p, *start, *result, number[99] = "1", temp[99];

    while(1){ /* loop forever */
        puts(number);

        result = temp; /* we'll be incrementing this pointer as we write */
        p = number;    /* we'll be incrementing this pointer as we read */

        while(*p){ /* loop till end of string */
            start = p; /* keep track of where we started */

            while(*p == *start) /* find all occurrences of this character */
                p++;

            *result++ = '0' + p - start; /* write the count of characters, */
            *result++ = *start;          /* the character just counted, */
            *result   = 0;               /* and a terminating null */
        }

        strcpy(number, temp); /* copy the result back to our working buffer */
    }
}

You can see it in action on ideone.

With the extra credit, the code looks like this:

main(){char*p,*s,*r,x[99],t[99];for(scanf("%s",x);r=t,puts(p=x);strcpy(x,t))
for(;*p;*r++=p-s+48,*r++=*s,*r=0)for(s=p;*++p==*s;);}
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