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I have a powershell script I want to be able to define different starting points for. Once the starting point is hit the script would pick up from that point and continue through the remaining code in the script. I don't believe that a case statement will work since I don't think that will just let the script flow through from whatever starting point is defined.

I would expect to see something like this when the script was started.

Please choose your starting point:

  1. Beginning
  2. Start at step 2
  3. Start at step 3 etc.....

When the selection is made the script jumps to that point then will run through the remainder of the script.

Answer: The code is going to end up looking something like this:

#steps
$stepChoice = read-host 'Where would you like to start.'

switch($stepChoice)
{
    1{Step1}
    2{Step2}
    3{Step3}

}

function Step1 { 
    'Step 1' 
    Step2 
} 
function Step2 { 
    'Step 2' 
    Step3 
} 
function Step3 { 
    'Step 3' 
    'Done!' 
}

Thanks for your help

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

AFAIK, there is nothing like this in PowerShell. If you need something simple this might work for you:

*) Create a script with steps defined as functions. Each function in the end calls the next step-function:

# Steps.ps1
function Step1 {
    'Step 1'
    Step2
}
function Step2 {
    'Step 2'
    Step3
}
function Step3 {
    'Step 3'
    'Done!'
}

*) If you want to start with step 1: dot-source the Steps.ps1 and call Step1:

. .\Steps.ps1
Step1

*) If you want to start with step 2: dot-source the Steps.ps1 and call Step2:

. .\Steps.ps1
Step2
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PowerShell doesn't contain a GOTO type command, so you must encapsulate each of the logic steps (Beginning, step2, step3, ...) in a procedure/code block of some kind and call as appropriate. While a switch statement won't scale well if you need a lot of choices, for three it would be fairly simple - here is an idea, though I am sure this idea can be implemented better:

function Begin () { "Starting" }
function Step-1 () { "One" }
function Step-2 () { "Two" }

function Take-Action() {
  param([string]$choice);
  switch ($choice) {
    "Start" { & Begin ; Take-Action "One" }
    "One" { & Step-1; Take-Action "Two" }
    "Two" { & Step-2 }
  }
}

& Take-Action "Start"

Output:

Starting
One
Two
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A more direct approach would be to use a series of if statements, so that any helper functions can be used independently without having to cross-reference other steps.

[int]$stepChoice = read-host 'Where would you like to start.'

if( $stepChoice -le 1 ) {
  'Step 1'
}

if( $stepChoice -le 2 ) {
  'Step 2'
}

if( $stepChoice -le 3 ) {
  'Step 3'
}

'Done!'

Also note that a switch statement will continue to evaluate conditions until it encounters a break statement, so this form will also work:

switch( $stepChoice ) {
  { $_ -le 1 } { 'Step 1' }
  { $_ -le 2 } { 'Step 2' }
  { $_ -le 3 } { 'Step 3' }
}

'Done!'
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This extra answer is probably too much for this particular task. But it may be useful to know about the tool. It can be used for similar and more convoluted tasks.

The tool is Invoke-Build.ps1. It is a standalone script, just put it anywhere in the path, this is it. Then use the code like this:

Steps.ps1

# Invoke-Build task is a sequence of scripts and other tasks.
# This task does its job and then calls the task Step2.
task Step1 {
    'Step 1'
},
Step2

# This task does its job and then calls the task Step3.
task Step2 {
    'Step 2'
},
Step3

# The last task, just its name and code.
task Step3 {
    'Step 3'
}

Test.ps1

Invoke-Build step1 Steps.ps1 # do steps 1, 2, 3
Invoke-Build step2 Steps.ps1 # do steps 2, 3
Invoke-Build step3 Steps.ps1 # do just step 3

The difference between this and previous answer is that with task approach actual step code blocks do not have to be explicitly dependent, that is to call some other steps. It is the task infrastructure that glues the actions together.

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