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I have a class like this:

class Foo
{
   long long Id;
   string x;
   string y;
   // other member variables and functions
};

I would like to store this in a hash_set (or hash_map), but use the Id member variable as the key for inserting and searching. I'm not sure how I can do this. I thought of the following ways, but none of them are really good:

1) I can write a custom hash function that will hash the object using the Id, but then I can't use the find() method on hash_set to lookup the item by Id (long long) since it will require a Foo object to be passed-in.

2) I can duplicate the Id and create a hash_map instead of a hash_set but I have 100 million instances of these objects so I'd rather not duplicate the Id field.

3) I can move the Id field outside of Foo and then do hash_map, but it would be kind of messy since the Id is used internally by the class and it would be better to keep it with Foo.

Any ideas? What I'm looking for is a way to store Foo objects but be able to search for them in the hash_set using a long long (by Id).

Thanks!

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Go with third approach. –  Grozz Oct 11 '10 at 17:49
    
The second is fine too. –  sellibitze Oct 11 '10 at 18:21
    
What's the usage pattern for this? Are you setting this up once and then only read from it or do you keep modifying the set? –  sbi Oct 11 '10 at 18:48

5 Answers 5

1) I can write a custom hash function that will hash the object using the Id, but then I can't use the find() method on hash_set to lookup the item by Id (long long) since it will require a Foo object to be passed-in.

This is a common problem with the standard map and set containers. Add a constructor or static member that creates a comparison object, an object with only the key member valid.

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Option 2 is your best bet among the three you gave. If you're up to it, you could write a custom hash_set (even just a wrapper around the regular one) to provide what you want. In that case, I'd prefer option 1. You could easily add a find function that takes just the key value and adapts it to use the internal find function properly giving you all benefits.

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I don't have much experience with it, but boost::multiindex is built on top of boost::hash by default, and has explicit support for looking up an object in a hash using only a key found in the object.

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If you don't find an actual solution for the hash_set/hash_map containers, you may want to consider using the uthash hash table implementation, which supports your use case directly. It's C though and it's based on macros but it's one of the most popular hash table implementations that exist.

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This may not be a particularly elegant solution, but it works: define an operator < (and operator == as well, as CashCow suggested) for your class that orders objects based on the Id field, then when you want to do a find, pass in a dummy object that contains the Id you're looking for.

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Works great for a standard set or map, not so great for hash-based containers. The operator <, I mean. –  Mark Ransom Oct 11 '10 at 17:54
    
Why not? I thought hash-based containers still depend on operator < to ultimately ensure that two objects are equal. –  casablanca Oct 11 '10 at 17:57
    
Both hash_map and unordered_map appear to take a comparison functor for equality, not less than. –  Mark Ransom Oct 11 '10 at 18:13
    
It seems unordered_map uses equal_to<Key> for comparison, but at least VC++'s hash_map uses hash_compare<Key, less<Key>>. –  casablanca Oct 11 '10 at 18:17
1  
Just overload the equality operator too. And for the hashing function itself just return the id. –  CashCow Oct 11 '10 at 18:41

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