Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following Groovy snippet produces weird results to me :

def s = "123456"
assert s.split("").size() == s.size()

Results in :

Assertion failed: 

assert s.split("").size() == s.size()
       | |         |      |  | |
       | |         7      |  | 6
       | |                |  123456
       | |                false
       | [, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
       123456

Is there something I've missed on the split() method behaviour or is this a real bug ?

share|improve this question
    
I'm using the latest Groovy build (1.7.5) –  Philippe Oct 11 '10 at 18:07
1  
That's exactly the same behavior as you'd expect from Java –  tim_yates Oct 11 '10 at 18:30
    
@tim_yates: yup, see my answer. –  Matt Ball Oct 11 '10 at 18:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'm not familiar with Groovy, but I'm going to go out on a limb here, and guess that String.split() works the same way as it does in Java. This means that the argument you're passing to split() is a String which represents a regex - in this case, the empty string. As per the Java docs:

This method works as if by invoking the two-argument split method with the given expression and a limit argument of zero. Trailing empty strings are therefore not included in the resulting array.

This means that your call split("") (e.g. "split on the empty string") is equivalent to split("", 0). Every (non-empty) string starts and ends with the empty string. So, your split("") call is in fact giving you [, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ], less the trailing empty strings, hence, [, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6].

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the explanation. That's indeed what I was missing here. –  Philippe Oct 12 '10 at 9:03

Why are you using split()? Use toCharArray():

assert s.toCharArray().length == s.size()
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.