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Having discovered that IE does not handle javascript onmouseout, I'm determined to use jQuery instead so the cross-browser compatibility would be taken care of automatically. I am making an area defined by an svg path light up when the mouse hovers over it, and I adapted the code provided on the Raphael website from the Australia example.

In this code, each state of Australia is defined by a Raphael path, for example Tasmania:

 aus.tas = R.path("...").attr(attr);

This path ('st') is then passed to the function:

st[0].onmouseover = function () {
    ...
};

Contrary to what I would have expected, the code is st[0].onmouseover as opposed to merely st.onmouseover. Thus, the path must actually be an array, and st[0], whatever that is, is the thing that is hovered over.

In order to replace onmouseover with the jQuery equivalent (which I believe is .mouseout()), I need to assign a class to st[0] so I can refer to it with jQuery. My question is, how do I do that? If the code was st.onmouseover it would be straightforward, but why is the path (st) an array? What exactly is st[0]? And how the heck do I get to it?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Note: That demo was made with an old version of Raphael. Now Raphael has its own custom event handlers including .mouseover() and .hover().


The short of it:

Simply wrap the DOM Object to make a jQuery Object out of it, or use the Raphael built in custom event handlers:

$(st[0]).mouseover( ... );            // This uses the jQuery .mouseover() method

Or, probably more convenient, and IE supported:

$(st[0]).hover( ... );                //     This uses the jQuery .hover() method

Or, using a Raphael built in event handler method:

st.mouseover( ... );                 // This uses the Raphael .mouseover() method
st.hover( ... );                     //     This uses the Raphael .hover() method

The long of it:

You can get the reference to the DOM object to work on using node or [0], since RaphaelObject[0] is always the reference to the DOM element:

aus.tas = R.path("...").attr(attr);

// aus.tas is a Raphael object
// aus.tas[0] is aus.tas.node is the reference to the DOM Object

$(aus.tas[0]).mouseover(function() {          // Could have also use aus.tas.node
    ...
});

// Raphael now has custom event handlers
aus.tas.mouseover(function() {
    ...
});
aus.tas.hover(function() {
    ...
}, function() {
    ...
});

So, with you function:

(function (st, state) {
      // st is a Raphael Object
      // st[0] is st.node is the reference to the DOM Object

      // This is now using jQuery for mouseover!
    $(st[0]).mouseover(function() {
        ...
    });
    ...
})(aus[state], state);

Additionally, I would suggest looking into the jQuery .hover() function, which does handle IE quite nicely:

(function (st, state) {
      // This is now using jQuery not Raphael for hover!
    $(st[0]).hover(function() {
        ... // the mouseenter function
    }, function() {
        ... // the mouseleave function
    });
    ...
})(aus[state], state);

As a simplified demonstration, here is how to bind mouseenter and mouseout using .hover() to a Raphael element (tested in IE 8):

​$(function() {
    var elie, paper = Raphael("canvas", 500, 500); 

      // Create Raphael element
    elie = paper.rect(0,0,100,100).attr("fill","#000");

      // Get reference to DOM object using .node and bind
      //     mouseover and mouseout to it:
    $(elie[0]).hover(function() {
        elie.attr("fill","#FFF");
    },function() {
        elie.attr("fill","#000");    
    });
});​

Try it out with this jsFiddle

Additionally, the Raphael .hover() method seem to work in IE too.

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1  
+1 For research and demo. Nicely done! –  Josh Stodola Oct 11 '10 at 19:52
1  
Thanks to all of you, awesome answers! Got it completely sorted now! –  Bazley Oct 11 '10 at 20:15
    
.hover() is mostly fine on IE, but there's a remaining difference between .hover() in IE and other browsers which can cause trouble. If your function moves the element out then back in again, e.g. if it resets a transform taking the element away from the mouse, then applies a transform putting the element back under the mouse, or if it does a .toFront() changing the order, non-IE carries on as if nothing happened, but IE triggers loads of mouseover events and then ignores mouseouts. –  user568458 Mar 1 '12 at 12:27

You don't need to assign a class to it in order to expose it to jQuery. Certainly not. You can simply pass your DOM element to jQuery and it will do the magic for you...

$(st[0]).mouseout(function() {
  alert("That mouse is outta here!");
};

You are seeing the array syntax because that is generally how Javascript libraries maintain a reference to the original element (essentially just "wrapping" it and adding functionality). Pseudo-code explanation...

st == Raphael element
st[0] == DOM element
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Note that you can also get the reference to associated DOM Object of a Raphael Object using the [ .node ](raphaeljs.com/reference.html#node) property. So st[0] and st.node are equivalent. –  Peter Ajtai Oct 11 '10 at 19:12
    
@Peter Good point. By the same token, jQuery has the get() method. –  Josh Stodola Oct 11 '10 at 19:14
    
Also, it seems like the Raphael [ .mouseover() and .hover() ](raphaeljs.com/reference.html#events) methods are cross browser, just like the jQuery ones. I think this demo was written before those methods or node were introduced. ---------- Anyway, +1 for the st[0] explanation. –  Peter Ajtai Oct 11 '10 at 19:43
    
Good point Peter, need to update the demo code. –  Dmitry Baranovskiy Oct 12 '10 at 9:15

If you end up just copying the code that's used by the Australia demo, you'll run into IE trouble no matter which handler (hover, mouseover, etc) you use.

After banging my head on it for a while, it seems that the st.toFront() in the hover in/out functions cancel the "mouse out" event in IE. Delete those lines from the example code and you should be fine.

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After realizing that neither of the accepted answer's jsFiddles work in IE9, I made my way down to the last answer on the page and removing the toFront lines solved my problem. Thank you, sir. –  griswoldo Mar 1 '12 at 13:48
1  
Thank you! This is solved it for me too. –  Rob Flaherty Mar 31 '12 at 0:18

This is a bit of javascript trickery, st is passed in. Look at the JS code in the australia example.

(function (st, state) {
                    .. some code referring to st[0] in here .. 
                })(aus[state], state);

So st[0] in this code refers to the path DOM node from aus[state].

Try it yourself with this simple example in a Firebug console:

(function(a,b) {alert(a); })("hello", "b");

hth

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In my case, the actual problem was with calling the .toFront every freakin millisecond, because .hover(fooFunction, outFunction) calls fooFunction with every mouse cursor shift. Actually, the name quite suggests that it's a hover call, not a mouseenter :)

So, the trick is to make sure your fooFunction, or the contents of it, is only executed once (onmouseenter). Even in IE this works perfectly for me, without accessing any DOM nodes or trying to access other stuff which I don't want to touch:

var MouseEventHelper = {
    hover: function (el, funcIn, funcOut) {
        var entered = false;

        el.hover(
            function (e) {
                if (entered) {
                    return;
                }

                funcIn(e);
                entered = true;
            },
            function (e) {
                funcOut(e);
                entered = false;
            }
        );
    }
}

Then replace your hover calls like this:

var el = paper.rect(...);
MouseEventHelper.hover(
    el, 
    function (e) { 
        // do whatever you want!
        el.toFront();
    }
    function (e) { }
);
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