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I have this code in my app .NET application using NServiceBus:

 Bus.Send<IServiceStarted>(e =>
                             {
                                  e.ServiceInfo = ReadServiceInfo();
                                  e.EventTime = DateProvider.Now;
                             });

How would you go about unit-testing such a code?

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Are you asking about testing Bus.Send, or code that sends messages? –  arootbeer Oct 11 '10 at 19:01
    
arootbeer, I am asking about testing code that sends messages. The exact code I want to test is given in the question above. –  mgamer Oct 11 '10 at 20:35
    
I added an edit regarding testing the delegate code in-place, in case you're interested. –  arootbeer Oct 18 '10 at 15:14
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As long as your Bus variable is an IBus instance, you can simply provide a mocked IBus implementation to the class that contains this method, and verify that Send was called on it (with the appropriate delegate, if you so desire) after the method was invoked for testing. Beyond that, you're getting into testing Bus.Send itself, which is not something you should be doing.

public class ClassThatSendsMessages
{
    private readonly IBus _bus;
    public ClassThatSendsMessages(IBus bus /*, ... */)
    {
        _bus = bus;
        /* ... */
    }

    public void CodeThatSendsMessage()
    {
        /* ... */
        _bus.Send<IMyMessage>(mm => mm.Property1 = "123");
        /* ... */
    }
}

public class ClassThatTestsClassThatSendsMessages
{
    public void CallCodeThatSendsMessage()
    {
        //Mock IBus object here
        var objectToTest = new ClassThatSendsMessages(mockedIBus /*, ... */)

        objectToTest.CodeThatSendsMessage();

        //Verify that IBus mock's Send() method was called
    }
}

There are two ways to approach testing the delegate's logic: you can try to break down the provided expression tree, or you can change it to a named method and pass it that way. I've never gotten deep into expressions, so I'll provide an example of the latter:

public static class MyMessageBuilder
{
    public static void Build(IMyMessage message) { /* ... */ }
}

public class ClassThatTestsMyMessageBuilder
{
    public void CallCodeThatBuildsMessage()
    {
        var message = Test.CreateInstance<IMyMessage>(MyMessageBuilder.Build);

        //Verify message contents
    }
}

Usage:

public class ClassThatSendsMessages
{
    private readonly IBus _bus;
    public static Action<IMyMessage> BuildMessage { private get; set; }
    public ClassThatSendsMessages(IBus bus /*, ... */)
    {
        _bus = bus;
        /* ... */
    }

    public void CodeThatSendsMessage()
    {
        /* ... */
        _bus.Send<IMyMessage>(mm => BuildMessage (mm));
        /* ... */
    }
}

I'm not aware of a container that can do delegate injection to constructors, but then I haven't looked very hard either, so that might be an even better way of setting the delegate.

EDIT

As I've recently run into this issue in my own tests, and I don't really like having to pull the method out into its own builder. So I set out to discover if I could test the delegate "in place". It turns out that you can:

public class ClassThatTestsClassThatSendsMessages
{
    public void CallCodeThatSendsMessage()
    {
    Action<IMyMessage> messageAction = null;

    //Mock IBus object here
    mockedIBus.Setup(b => b.Send(Args.IsAny<Action<IMyMessage>>()))
        .Callback((Action<IMyMessage> a) => messageAction = a);
    var myMessage = Test.CreateInstance<IMyMessage>();

    var objectToTest = new ClassThatSendsMessages(mockedIBus /*, ... */)

    //Run the code that sends the message
    objectToTest.CodeThatSendsMessage();
    //Run the code that populates the message
    messageAction(myMessage);

    //Verify expectations on Setups
    //Verify the message contents;
    }
}

There are tradeoffs here - pulling the message builder out into an interface is certainly more compliant with SRP than leaving it as an inline delegate (as the test clearly demonstrates: you have to Act twice in order to test all the code). However, it presents benefits in both code size and readability.

Additionally, this code is Moq-specific; I don't know whether it's possible to get the delegate back from a RhinoMocks mock, or what the syntax would be for that.

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1  
If the code being testing is a message handler, then you can use the NServiceBus.Testing library which can mock the bus for you, and if you use setter injection for the IBus property, it will inject it into your handler as well. –  Udi Dahan Oct 12 '10 at 5:16
    
arootbeer, the hard part to me is how to verify that Send method was called with the appropriate delegate? Rhino Mocks offers a method AssertWasCalled which accepts constraints on the arguments, but it there a constrain allowing you to verify if method was called with a proper delegate? –  mgamer Oct 12 '10 at 6:34
    
You could try using GetArgumentsForCallsMadeOn to pull out the delegate and inspect its properties: kashfarooq.wordpress.com/2009/01/10/… –  Patrick Steele Oct 12 '10 at 12:01
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Check out the test framework that comes with NSB, it's using Rhino underneath: http://nservicebus.com/UnitTesting.aspx. there are several samples in the download that use it with NUnit. You can get it to work under MSTest as well.

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