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I have this code here that has two arrays. It sorts arr[], so that the highest value will be in index 0. Now the second array arr1[] contains strings, I'd like the code to apply whatever changes where made to arr[] to arr1[]. So that arr[0] would return 6, while arr1[0] would return the string "d1". Notice how "d1" was at the same index as 6? After sorting I'd like the same values to still have their string counterparts.

How would I go about doing this?

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
using namespace std ;


main(){
int arr[ 5 ] = { 4, 1, 3, 6, 2 };

string arr1[ 5 ] = { "a1", "b1", "c1", "d1", "e1" };

std::sort( arr, arr + 5, std::greater< int >() );
cout << arr[0] << arr1[0] << endl;

system("pause");
}
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once you have sorted arr the original sort order is no longer known. You'll need to store the original order if you want to sort the other array by simple assignment. –  Matt Ellen Oct 11 '10 at 19:25
    
If arr and arr1 are related, why aren't they stored together (say as a structure) in the first place? –  casablanca Oct 11 '10 at 19:27
    
duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/236172/… –  Shay Erlichmen Oct 11 '10 at 19:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Rather than sort the arrays, sort the indices. I.e., you have

int arr[5]={4,1,3,6,2}
string arr1[5]={"a1","b1","c1","d1","e1"};

and you make

int indices[5]={0,1,2,3,4};

now you make a sort indices comparitor that looks like this (just and idea, you'll probably have to fix it a little)

class sort_indices
{
   private:
     int* mparr;
   public:
     sort_indices(int* parr) : mparr(parr) {}
     bool operator()(int i, int j) { return mparr[i]<mparr[j]; }
}

now you can use the stl sort

std::sort(indices, indicies+5, sort_indices(arr));

when you're done, the indices array will be such that arr[indices[0]] is the first element. and likewise arr1[indices[0]] is the corresponding pair.

this is also a very useful trick when you're trying to sort a large data object, you don't need to move the data around at every swap, just the indices.

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Good answer apart from the minor point that he is sorting descending, but yes, this is the way to do it. –  CashCow Oct 11 '10 at 19:36
    
Yeah, and the operator() needs to be const for this to work too. :) –  miked Oct 11 '10 at 19:38
2  
Note that if you genuinely need the two arrays sorted, then using the array of indices to put the original arrays into order isn't entirely trivial. –  Steve Jessop Oct 12 '10 at 9:57

You need to combine them together and then sort the combined pair and then un-combine the pairs.

int arr[ 5 ] = { ... };
string arr1[ 5 ] = { ... };
pair<int, string> pairs[ 5 ];

for ( int i = 0; i < 5; ++i )
  pairs[ i ] = make_pair( arr[ i ], arr1[ i ] );

sort( pairs.begin(), pairs.end() );

for ( int i = 0; i < 5; ++i )
{
  arr[ i ] = pairs[ i ].first;
  arr1[ i ] = pairs[ i ].second;
}

Really though, if arr and arr1 are related then they should be stored as the pair (or at least a custom struct) anyway. That way you don't need to use this as an intermediate step.

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Write your own iterator and use STD:sort. It's easily coded in less than 50 lines without 3rd party libraries. Swap function IS VERY IMPORTANT here.

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>     // std::iterator, std::input_iterator_tag
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

struct Tuple;
struct RefTuple;
#define TUPLE_COMMON_FUNC(C, D, E, F)            \
    C##::C## (Tuple& t) ##D                        \
    C##::C## (RefTuple& t) ##D                    \
    void C##::operator = (Tuple& t) ##E        \
    void C##::operator = (RefTuple& t) ##E    \
    bool C##::operator < (const Tuple& t) const ##F        \
    bool C##::operator < (const RefTuple& t) const ##F
#define ASSIGN_1    : i(t.i), j(t.j), s(t.s) {}
#define ASSIGN_2    { i = t.i; j = t.j; s = t.s; }
#define SORT_CRITERIA \
    return (j < t.j) || (j == t.j && (i < t.i));
struct Tuple {
    int i, j, s;
    TUPLE_COMMON_FUNC(Tuple, ; , ; , ;)
};
struct RefTuple {
    int &i, &j, &s;
    RefTuple(int &x, int &y, int &z): i(x), j(y), s(z) {}
    TUPLE_COMMON_FUNC(RefTuple, ; , ; , ;)
};
TUPLE_COMMON_FUNC(Tuple, ASSIGN_1, ASSIGN_2, {SORT_CRITERIA})
TUPLE_COMMON_FUNC(RefTuple, ASSIGN_1, ASSIGN_2, {SORT_CRITERIA})

void swap(RefTuple& t1, RefTuple& t2) {
    t1.i ^= t2.i; t2.i ^= t1.i; t1.i ^= t2.i;
    t1.j ^= t2.j; t2.j ^= t1.j; t1.j ^= t2.j;
    t1.s ^= t2.s; t2.s ^= t1.s; t1.s ^= t2.s;
}

class IterTuple : public iterator<random_access_iterator_tag, Tuple> {
    int *i, *j, *s, idx;
public:
    IterTuple(int* x, int*y, int* z, int l) : i(x), j(y), s(z), idx(l) {}
    IterTuple(const IterTuple& e) : i(e.i), j(e.j), s(e.s), idx(e.idx) {}
    RefTuple operator*() { return RefTuple(i[idx], j[idx], s[idx]);  }
    IterTuple& operator ++ () { idx++; return *this; }
    IterTuple& operator -- () { idx--; return *this; }
    IterTuple operator ++ (int) { IterTuple tmp(*this); idx++; return tmp; }
    IterTuple operator -- (int) { IterTuple tmp(*this); idx--; return tmp; }
    int operator - (IterTuple& rhs) { return idx - rhs.idx;    }
    IterTuple operator + (int n) { IterTuple tmp(*this); tmp.idx += n; return tmp; }
    IterTuple operator - (int n) { IterTuple tmp(*this); tmp.idx -= n; return tmp; }
    bool operator==(const IterTuple& rhs) {        return idx == rhs.idx;    }
    bool operator!=(const IterTuple& rhs) {     return idx != rhs.idx;  }
    bool operator<(IterTuple& rhs) {     return idx < rhs.idx;   }
};

int Ai[10] = {0, 0, 2, 3, 2, 4, 1, 1, 4, 2};
int Aj[10] = {0, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 0, 1, 0, 2};
int Ax[10] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};

int main () {
    IterTuple from(Ai, Aj, Ax, 0);
    IterTuple until(Ai, Aj, Ax, 10);

    sort(from, until);

    for (IterTuple it = from; it != until; it++)
        cout << (*it).i << ' ' << (*it).j << ' ' << (*it).s << '\n';

    return 0;
}
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