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I've heard a lot of buzz through the years about "Self Describing" web services and I'm curious what it means. I've flipped through the W3C standard and it doesn't really help.

I understand you can say "Give me this argument and call this functionality and I'll return something like this", but how is that actually helpful? How can software know what is relevant to a client given some context?

Can anyone give real world examples of this concept, and explain how it's better than some other alternative? Or maybe how useful/useless it is?

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Providing WSDL is a way of self-describing. Or is that not the kind you meant? w3.org/TR/wsdl –  bzlm Oct 11 '10 at 20:41
    
That is what I meant, I still don't understand the practical applications. –  Ziplin Oct 11 '10 at 21:00
    
Well, to answer the question about what it "really means", I think the reasoning behind WSDL is quite to the point. –  bzlm Oct 11 '10 at 21:17
    
Ok - well how about the example located at w3.org/TR/wsdl#_wsdl What good does it do for an application to know that there is some operation called "GetLastTradePrice" that takes some type argument and returns some type. How can an application use this information to attach to some service it's never seen before, generate an interface for a client to intelligently use, and then execute commands on that interface? It all seems so high-level and abstract to the point of being useless –  Ziplin Oct 11 '10 at 21:57
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So from what I've been able to gather is this information IS NOT used at runtime in the manner I thought. Rather, it's really designed as a standard for describing in a cross-platform cross-language manner an interface that a developer can use to develop a SOAP based way to exchange information with a web service. --- Again, my hang up here was that it does not involve runtime discovery. I now realize that assumption wasn't abundantly clear because I assumed that's was a core intention of "self-describing" –  Ziplin Nov 1 '10 at 4:15

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It's really designed as a standard for describing in a cross-platform cross-language manner an interface that a developer can use to develop a SOAP based way to exchange information with a web service.

Another alternative would be providing a library that provides a local interface to a blackbox communcation scheme, which is fraught with compatability/security issues.

Or providing documentation, which may be difficult to find, have compatibility issues, be out of date, or incomplete.

In short, it's very useful.

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Note that a self describing web service merely provides a technical implementation, and not necessarily a plain English explanation. So some extra documentation should be provided to explain what the methods and parameters actually mean and do, or your method names better be pretty clear. –  Ziplin Nov 8 '10 at 15:09
    
I like your answer, however could you precise if a webservice receiving a bulk of generic data (such a keys/values strings array) as an extra parameter (on which the service may rely for its behaviour) can be considered as a selfdescribing service since it is a webservice even if it is requiring extra documentation ? For me no, but I'd like exchange experiences on this. –  snowflake Feb 4 '11 at 9:46

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