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why make things more complex? why do this:

txtNumerator.Text = 
     txtNumerator.Text == "" ? "0" : txtNumerator.Text;

instead of this:

if txtNumerator.Text="" {txtNumerator.Text="0";}
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closed as not constructive by casperOne Jan 6 '12 at 15:54

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8  
I think you'll like the ?? operator. –  iandisme Oct 11 '10 at 21:35
    
Brevity is good –  Steve Townsend Oct 11 '10 at 22:11
    
iandisme@ you are killing me –  Yuck Oct 12 '10 at 16:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Suppose you wanted to pass either zero or txtNumerator.Text to a method M. How would you do that?

You could say:

string argument;
if (txtNumerator.Text == "")
{
    argument = "0";
}
else
{
    argument = txtNumerator.Text;
}
M(argument);

Or you could say

M(txtNumerator.Text == "" ? "0" : txtNumerator.Text);

The latter is shorter and easier to read.

The larger point here is that statements are useful for their side effects and expressions are useful for their values. If what you want to do is control which of two side effects happens, then use an "if" statement. If what you want to do is control which value gets chosen from two possibilities, then consider using a conditional expression.

UPDATE:

Jenny asks why not just do this?

if (txtNumerator.Text == "")
{
    M("0");
}
else
{
    M(txtNumerator.Text);
}

That's fine if there's just one condition to check. But what if there are, say, four? Now there are sixteen possibilities and writing the "if" statement for it gets messy to say the least:

if (text1.Text == "")
{
    if (text2.Text == "")
    {
        if (text3.Text == "")
        {
            if (text4.Text == "")
            {
                M("1", "2", "3", "4");
            }
            else
            {
                M("1", "2", "3", text4.Text);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (text4.Text == "")
            {
                M("1", "2", text3.Text, "4");
            }
            else
            {
                M("1", "2", text3.Text, text4.Text);
            }
        }
        ... about fifty more lines of this.

Instead, you can just say:

M(Text1.Text == "" ? "1" : Text1.Text,
  Text2.Text == "" ? "2" : Text2.Text,
  Text3.Text == "" ? "3" : Text3.Text,
  Text4.Text == "" ? "4" : Text4.Text);
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if textbox="" then pass ONE, else pass TWO –  Yuck Oct 11 '10 at 20:53
1  
@jenny: OK, now suppose there were three more arguments to M, each of which also had a conditional value. That's sixteen possibilities. Would you have sixteen different calls to M? –  Eric Lippert Oct 11 '10 at 20:56
6  
The * conditional operator * is also useful when you want to invoke a base class constructor during the initialization of a derived type and you need to pass values that are computed from parameters: class Foo : Bar { Foo( string txt ) : base( txt == "" ? "0" : txt ) } - for instance. You could also write static members to do so, but it's far more convenient using ?: in such cases. –  LBushkin Oct 11 '10 at 21:04
5  
@LBushkin makes a good point. There are many contexts in C# in which a statement is illegal but an expression is legal. In some of those contexts you'd like to be able to express the notion of making a choice, but the "if" statement is not available because it is a statement. –  Eric Lippert Oct 11 '10 at 21:11
1  
@Ben: Correct; C# does not allow statements in lambdas that are converted to expression trees. We now have an expression tree library that includes statements, so in theory we could do so. It just has not been a priority because building "statement lambda" expression trees does not enable any new LINQ scenarios. –  Eric Lippert Oct 11 '10 at 21:28

It's one expression, so you can use the result directly in an assignment or a function call without having to duplicate the context in which you're using it. That makes a lot of usage scenarios significantly cleaner to write and read. For example:

int abs = (x >= 0) ? x : -x;

versus

int abs;
if (x >= 0)
    abs = x;
else
    abs = -x;
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3  
This, to me, is kind of a key point. You can make subjective arguments about which approach is more aesthetically appealling and a lot will depend on the situation, but having the abilitiy to short circuit a separate declaration statement and assignment statement(s) is significant. Ultimately, the ternary operation plays a different role than the 'if' one does, because 'if' is useful for creating separate code branches, whereas '?' is useful for obtaining a particular value. –  Steven Oct 11 '10 at 21:29

There are many standards guides that say not to use the ternary operator. However you could agre that all language feature are unnecessary except for goto and if. I use it when having a multitude of if then elses.

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i like this answer –  Yuck Oct 11 '10 at 20:55

It makes the code more readable in some people opinion, a lot of constructs in the language are syntactic sugar (think about do..while, while..do, and for(..)) and in the end of the day you choose whatever works for you (and your team).

I for example think that the above code should be implemented with an extension method:

txtNumerator.SetDefault("0");
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If you go with the if-then construct, you end up with two assignments to the same variable, in two separate blocks. The ternary form has only one assignment. So there is no need to look at a second block to verify to yourself what both blocks are performing an assignment to the same variable. In that respect I think the ternary form reads better.

On the other hand if C# worked like Ruby and if was an expression, then you could do without the ternary operator and use if-else in that case:

txtNumerator.Text = if (txtNumerator.Text == "" ) "0"; else (txtNumerator.Text);

which I would prefer because then the different syntax of ?: could be dropped.

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