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I have simple methods to export DataTable to XLS using string. Number of columns is 5 - 30, and number or rows might be from 1 to 1000. Sometimes there is problem with performance, and I please for advice what can I change in my code. I'm using .net 4.0

public string FormatCell(string columnName, object value)
        {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        string formattedValue = string.Empty;
        string type = "String";
        string style = "s21";

        if (!(value is DBNull) && columnName.Contains("GIS"))
            formattedValue = Convert.ToDouble(value).ToString("##.00000000°");
        else if (value is DateTime)
        {
            style = "s22";
            type = "DateTime";
            DateTime date = (DateTime)value;
            formattedValue = date.ToString("yyyy-MM-ddTHH:mm:ss.fff");
        }
        else if (value is double || value is float || value is decimal)
        {
            formattedValue = Convert.ToDecimal(value).ToString("#.00").Replace(',', '.');
            type = "Number";
        }
        else if (value is int)
        {
            formattedValue = value.ToString();
            type = "Number";
        }
        else
            formattedValue = value.ToString();

        builder.Append(string.Format("<Cell ss:StyleID=\"{0}\"><Data ss:Type=\"{1}\">", style, type));

        builder.Append(formattedValue);
        builder.AppendLine("</Data></Cell>");

        return builder.ToString();
    }

    public string ConvertToXls(DataTable table)
    {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

        int rows = table.Rows.Count + 1;
        int cols = table.Columns.Count;

        builder.AppendLine("<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"UTF-8\" ?>");
        builder.AppendLine("<?mso-application progid=\"Excel.Sheet\"?>");
        builder.AppendLine("<Workbook xmlns=\"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:spreadsheet\"");
        builder.AppendLine(" xmlns:o=\"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office\"");
        builder.AppendLine(" xmlns:x=\"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:excel\"");
        builder.AppendLine(" xmlns:ss=\"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:spreadsheet\"");
        builder.AppendLine(" xmlns:html=\"http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/\">");
        builder.AppendLine(" <DocumentProperties xmlns=\"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office\">;");
        builder.AppendLine("  <Author>Author</Author>");
        builder.AppendLine(string.Format("  <Created>{0}T{1}Z</Created>", DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy-mm-dd"), DateTime.Now.ToString("HH:MM:SS")));
        builder.AppendLine("  <Company>Company</Company>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <Version>1.0</Version>");
        builder.AppendLine(" </DocumentProperties>");
        builder.AppendLine(" <ExcelWorkbook xmlns=\"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:excel\">");
        builder.AppendLine("  <WindowHeight>8955</WindowHeight>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <WindowWidth>11355</WindowWidth>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <WindowTopX>480</WindowTopX>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <WindowTopY>15</WindowTopY>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <ProtectStructure>False</ProtectStructure>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <ProtectWindows>False</ProtectWindows>");
        builder.AppendLine(" </ExcelWorkbook>");
        builder.AppendLine(" <Styles>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <Style ss:ID=\"Default\" ss:Name=\"Normal\">");
        builder.AppendLine("   <Alignment ss:Vertical=\"Bottom\"/>");
        builder.AppendLine("   <Borders/>");
        builder.AppendLine("   <Font/>");
        builder.AppendLine("   <Interior/>");
        builder.AppendLine("   <Protection/>");
        builder.AppendLine("  </Style>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <Style ss:ID=\"s21\">");
        builder.AppendLine("   <Alignment ss:Vertical=\"Bottom\" ss:WrapText=\"1\"/>");
        builder.AppendLine("  </Style>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <Style ss:ID=\"s22\">");
        builder.AppendLine("    <NumberFormat ss:Format=\"Short Date\"/>");
        builder.AppendLine("  </Style>");
        builder.AppendLine(" </Styles>");
        builder.AppendLine(" <Worksheet ss:Name=\"Export\">");
        builder.AppendLine(string.Format("  <Table ss:ExpandedColumnCount=\"{0}\" ss:ExpandedRowCount=\"{1}\" x:FullColumns=\"1\"", cols.ToString(), rows.ToString()));
        builder.AppendLine("   x:FullRows=\"1\">");

        //generate title
        builder.AppendLine("<Row>");
        foreach (DataColumn eachColumn in table.Columns)  // you can write a half columns of table and put the remaining columns in sheet2
        {
            if (eachColumn.ColumnName != "ID")
            {
                builder.Append("<Cell ss:StyleID=\"s21\"><Data ss:Type=\"String\">");
                builder.Append(eachColumn.ColumnName.ToString());
                builder.AppendLine("</Data></Cell>");
            }
        }
        builder.AppendLine("</Row>");

        //generate data
        foreach (DataRow eachRow in table.Rows)
        {
            builder.AppendLine("<Row>");
            foreach (DataColumn eachColumn in table.Columns)
            {
                if (eachColumn.ColumnName != "ID")
                {
                    builder.AppendLine(FormatCell(eachColumn.ColumnName, eachRow[eachColumn]));
                }
            }
            builder.AppendLine("</Row>");
        }
        builder.AppendLine("  </Table>");
        builder.AppendLine("  <WorksheetOptions xmlns=\"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:excel\">");
        builder.AppendLine("   <Selected/>");
        builder.AppendLine("   <Panes>");
        builder.AppendLine("    <Pane>");
        builder.AppendLine("     <Number>3</Number>");
        builder.AppendLine("     <ActiveRow>1</ActiveRow>");
        builder.AppendLine("    </Pane>");
        builder.AppendLine("   </Panes>");
        builder.AppendLine("   <ProtectObjects>False</ProtectObjects>");
        builder.AppendLine("   <ProtectScenarios>False</ProtectScenarios>");
        builder.AppendLine("  </WorksheetOptions>");
        builder.AppendLine(" </Worksheet>");
        builder.AppendLine(" <Worksheet ss:Name=\"Sheet2\">");
        builder.AppendLine("  <WorksheetOptions xmlns=\"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:excel\">");
        builder.AppendLine("   <ProtectObjects>False</ProtectObjects>");
        builder.AppendLine("   <ProtectScenarios>False</ProtectScenarios>");
        builder.AppendLine("  </WorksheetOptions>");
        builder.AppendLine(" </Worksheet>");
        builder.AppendLine(" <Worksheet ss:Name=\"Sheet3\">");
        builder.AppendLine("  <WorksheetOptions xmlns=\"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:excel\">");
        builder.AppendLine("   <ProtectObjects>False</ProtectObjects>");
        builder.AppendLine("   <ProtectScenarios>False</ProtectScenarios>");
        builder.AppendLine("  </WorksheetOptions>");
        builder.AppendLine(" </Worksheet>");
        builder.AppendLine("</Workbook>");

        return builder.ToString();
    }

using this:

string xlsData= ConvertToXls(someTable)


System.CodeDom.Compiler.TempFileCollection fileCollection = new System.CodeDom.Compiler.TempFileCollection();

                    string tempFileName = fileCollection.AddExtension("xls", true);

                    if (File.Exists(tempFileName))
                        File.Delete(tempFileName);

                    using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(tempFileName, false, Encoding.UTF8))
                        writer.Write(xlsData);
share|improve this question
    
I updated my answer below. StringBuilder isn't your problem, I made some suggestions to streamline FormatCell which is almost certainly where all the processing time is going. –  Jamie Treworgy Oct 21 '10 at 15:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The simplest thing you can do is declare StringBuilder with a capacity other than the default value, e.g.

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(100000);

The default allocation is 16 bytes, and doubles each time it needs to be re-allocated. This means that it's going to be reallocated many times if you use the default.

Unless your system is tight on memory, or this is really, really huge, I doubt that streaming it directly as was suggested before would make much difference. I suspect it could actually make things marginally worse, since I doubt there's less overhead to a file stream write versus adding data to a StreamBuilder object that's already been allocated (assuming it doesn't need to be reallocated frequently!)

The optimal solution might be to send the stringbuilder output to a stream periodically as it grows to some size (based on the memory of your system) if it could be more than, say, a 10 or 20 megabytes. That way you would avoid memory issues as well as avoid any potential overhead associated with many small writes to the output stream.

Update - Testing note:

I ran some tests creating very large strings (>50 megabytes)and there is little appreciable difference allocating memory in advance.

But more importantly, the amount of time required just to create such a string using the simplest possible form:

  for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
  {
     builder.AppendLine("a whole bunch of text designed to see how long it takes to build huge strings ");
  }

is almost inconsequential. I can fill up all of my desktop computer's memory in a couple seconds.

What this means is that the overhead of StringBuilder is not at all your problem. One can also deduce from this that switching to a stream write will definitely not help you either.

Instead, you need to look at some of the operations you are doing thousands or tens of thousands of times. This loop::

foreach (DataRow eachRow in table.Rows)
        {
            builder.AppendLine("<Row>");
            foreach (DataColumn eachColumn in table.Columns)
            {
                if (eachColumn.ColumnName != "ID")
                {
                    builder.AppendLine(FormatCell(eachColumn.ColumnName, eachRow[eachColumn]));
                }
            }
            builder.AppendLine("</Row>");
        }
  • Eliminate the check for the ColumnName!="ID" by removing that from your select
  • FormatCell gets run once for every single data element. Minor changes to the efficiency of this could have a huge impact
  • Didn't think about this before, but if your DataTable is coming from an SQL data source, use a DataReader directly instead of the in-memory DataTable

Suggestion for improving FormatCell:

  • Build an index of the datatypes of each column in advance so you don't have to do costly type compare each time
  • Setting string values for Type and Style, and altering them based on the data type, is expensive. Use enums instead and then output the values using hardcoded strings based on the enum value.
  • Move any variables inside FormatCell to the main class so they do not need to be created/allocated every single time you call the procedure

To build the index, I think the most efficient way would be to map the column numbers to an array that defines the type for each column, like the code below, then in FormatCell just use your pre-built map of columnnumbers to datatypes.

enum DataTypes
    {
        DateTime = 1,
        Float = 2,
        Int = 3,
        String = 4
    }
    DataTypes[] types = new DataTypes[tbl.Columns.Count];
    for (int col=0;i<tbl.Columns.Count;col++) {
        object value = tbl.Rows[0][col];
        if (value is double || value is float || value is decimal) {
            types[col]=DataTypes.Float;
        } else if (value is DateTime) {
            types[col]=DataTypes.DateTime;
        } else if (value is int) {
            types[col]=DataTypes.Int;
        } else {
            types[col]=DataTypes.String;
        }
    }

Then pass FormatCell the columnumber and it can look up the datatype from the array, and just check with a switch:

switch(types[colNumber]) {
   case DataTypes.DateTime:
       ...
       break;
   case DataTypes.Int:
...
 /// and so on
}

I think this would cut down a lot of overhead.

share|improve this answer

You should profile your code with something like dotTrace to see where the time is going. At least put in timers to see how long each part is taking. Optimising without knowing where the bottleneck is is likely to be a waste of time. EG:

   DateTime startTime = DateTime.Now;
   Debug.WriteLine("Start : " + startTime);

   //some code

   Debug.WriteLine("End: " + DateTime.Now);
   Debug.WriteLine("Elapsed : " + (DateTime.Now - startTime));

I think John above is correct though. Use a Stream. eg.

StreamWriter streamWriter = System.IO.File.CreateText("c:\\mynewfile.xls");

streamWriter.AutoFlush = false;

//lots of writes

streamWriter.Flush();
streamWriter.Close();

You should test with autoflush false and true. You may also want to try a memory stream.

StreamWriter streamWriter = new StreamWriter(new MemoryStream());
share|improve this answer

Well, you are just creating a bigger and bigger string in memory...so that would get worse and worse as the size goes up.

Is there any reason you aren't streaming this out to a file as you go, instead of building a GIANT string, and then serializing that out to a file?

Edit after you added your details:

Instead of having ConvertToXLS return a string, pass that streamwriter TO your convertToXLS method.

public void ConvertToXLS( DataTable table, StreamWriter stream )
{
    ...
}

inside of ConverToXLS, get rid of that StringBuilder, and replace all the calls of builder.AppendLine( x ) to

stream.WriteLine(x); 

That way as you are going, you're writing to the stream instead of creating a giant string.

share|improve this answer
    
Streaming ? What you mean? Could you give some example or link? I added code how I using this method. –  user278618 Oct 11 '10 at 21:19
    
@user278618: Streaming is when instead of sending data in one large piece it is sent continuously in small pieces. Like having a stream of water to your house through a pipe instead of a weekly delivery of a large water tank. –  Zan Lynx Oct 11 '10 at 21:59

Instead of writing the lines out twice, once in memory and then writing to disk, try to get it down to one write operation. Straight to disk.

I have no idea what the performance comparison is like between the xml objects in .net and the stringbuilder but if I knew I was writing out Xml, I would tend to go for the xml object solutions, xmlwriter xlinq etc. The comfort in knowing that the data your producing is xml compliant on time every time is very reassuring.

Other posts on SS have stated that they think its faster using XmlTextWriter than StringBuilder.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2478427/stringbuilder-vs-xmltextwriter.

The answers about changing buffer sizes and delaying writes will work, but can be very hit and miss, yes your operations get faster if you do it all in memory, but then your memory footprint may get very large, so that the OS might do some disk swapping which affects the entire machine.(depending what you got running on your machine). Find the happy compromise and then stream the data at the write speed that your production system is happy with.

share|improve this answer

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