Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I call the C++ placement new on constructors with parameters? I am implementing a custom allocator and want to avoid having to move functionality from non-default constructors into an init function.

class CFoo
{
public:
    int foo;
    CFoo()
    {
        foo = 0;
    }

    CFoo(int myFoo)
    {
        foo = myFoo;
    }
};

CFoo* foo = new (pChunkOfMemory) CFoo(42);

I would expect an object of type CFoo to be constructed at pChunkOfMemory using the second constructor. When using operator new am I stuck with default constructors only?

Solved! I did not #include <new>. After this, calling placement ::new worked fine with non-default constructors.

share|improve this question
2  
Have you tried it? –  Etienne de Martel Oct 11 '10 at 22:27
    
Yes - error C2660: 'operator new' : function does not take 2 arguments. Do you have an answer to the question? –  Chris Masterton Oct 11 '10 at 22:29
4  
Does placement new with no constructor arguments work in the same context? Did you remember to #include <new>? –  aschepler Oct 11 '10 at 22:31
    
I had not include <new> after all! Thank you. –  Chris Masterton Oct 12 '10 at 0:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

To use placement new, you need to include the header <new>:

#include <new>

Otherwise the placement forms of operator new aren't defined.

share|improve this answer
    
Success! I cant believe I've been struggling with this all day and it was a missing include file. D'oh! Thanks GMan and aschelper. –  Chris Masterton Oct 11 '10 at 22:39
    
@Chris: Yup. It's easy to forget about these little headers because they're often included by other ones that are almost always included. –  GManNickG Oct 11 '10 at 22:40
4  
Including <new> is the practical answer to the OP's question, but the information given in the first line above is incorrect. One does not need to icnlude new, but the relevant operator new allocation function must be defined (as a member or in the global namespace). To the OP: to be sure to use the global allocation function you should generally write ::new, not just new, when using the "construct in place" placement new; otherwise you might pick up a member allocation function. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 11 '10 at 22:51
    
@Alf: Fair, though I doubt circumventing a member operator new is the best intention. –  GManNickG Oct 12 '10 at 0:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.