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I was wondering, what is the difference among Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor() and Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1)

The below is picked from javadoc

Unlike the otherwise equivalent newFixedThreadPool(1) the returned executor is guaranteed not to be reconfigurable to use additional threads.

I try the following code below, seems no difference.

package javaapplication5;

import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

/**
 *
 * @author yan-cheng.cheok
 */
public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Main();
    }

    public Main() {
        //ExecutorService threadExecutor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
        ExecutorService threadExecutor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1);
        threadExecutor.submit(new BadTask());
        threadExecutor.submit(new Task());      
    }

    class BadTask implements Runnable {
        public void run() {
            throw new RuntimeException();
        }
    }

    class Task implements Runnable {
        public void run() {
            for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
                System.out.println("[LIVE]");
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(200);
                } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                    Logger.getLogger(Main.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Most probably something wrong with my understanding :)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just like it says:

Unlike the otherwise equivalent newFixedThreadPool(1) the returned executor is guaranteed not to be reconfigurable to use additional threads.

The difference is (only) that the SingleThreadExecutor cannot have his thread size adjusted later on, which you can do with a FixedThreadExecutor by calling ThreadPoolExecutor#setCorePoolSize (needs a cast first).

share|improve this answer
    
But, how do you adjust the thread size for newFixedThreadPool(1) ? –  Cheok Yan Cheng Oct 12 '10 at 1:39
2  
((ThreadPoolExecutor)newFixedThreadPool(1)).setCorePoolSize(3); –  Thilo Oct 12 '10 at 1:42

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