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I know in certain circumstances, such as long running processes, it is important to lock ASP.NET cache in order to avoid subsequent requests by another user for that resource from executing the long process again instead of hitting the cache.

What is the best way in c# to implement cache locking in ASP.NET?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 73 down vote accepted

Here's the basic pattern:

  • Check the cache for the value, return if its available
  • If the value is not in the cache, then implement a lock
  • Inside the lock, check the cache again, you might have been blocked
  • Perform the value look up and cache it
  • Release the lock

In code, it looks like this:

private static object ThisLock = new object();

public string GetFoo()
{

  // try to pull from cache here

  lock (ThisLock)
  {
    // cache was empty before we got the lock, check again inside the lock

    // cache is still empty, so retreive the value here

    // store the value in the cache here
  }

  // return the cached value here

}
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3  
If the first load of the cache takes some minutes, is there still a way to access the entries already loaded? Lets say if I have GetFoo_AmazonArticlesByCategory(string categoryKey). I guess it would by something like a lock per categoryKey. –  Malcolm Frexner Jun 23 '09 at 17:54
2  
Called "double-checked locking". en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-checked_locking –  Brad Gagne Jan 24 '13 at 18:13

For completeness a full example would look something like this.

private static object ThisLock = new object();
...
object dataObject = Cache["globalData"];
if( dataObject == null )
{
    lock( ThisLock )
    {
        dataObject = Cache["globalData"];

        if( dataObject == null )
        {
            //Get Data from db
             dataObject = GlobalObj.GetData();
             Cache["globalData"] = dataObject;
        }
    }
}
return dataObject;
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7  
if( dataObject == null ) { lock(ThisLock) { if( dataObject == null ) // of course it's still null! –  Constantin Oct 7 '08 at 20:17
13  
@Constantin: not really, someone might have updated the cache while you were waiting to acquire the lock() –  Tudor Olariu Aug 3 '09 at 9:39
11  
@John Owen - after the lock statement you have to try to get the object from the cache again! –  Pavel Nikolov Oct 14 '09 at 9:22
3  
-1, code is wrong (read the other comments), why don't you fix it? People might try to use your example. –  orip Sep 8 '10 at 8:22
11  
This code is actually still wrong. You're returning globalObject in a scope where it doesn't actually exist. What should happen is that dataObject should be used inside the final null check, and globalObject doesn't event need to exist at all. –  Scott Anderson Feb 23 '11 at 19:44

Just to echo what Pavel said, I believe this is the most thread safe way of writing it

private T GetOrAddToCache<T>(string cacheKey, GenericObjectParamsDelegate<T> creator, params object[] creatorArgs) where T : class, new()
    {
        T returnValue = HttpContext.Current.Cache[cacheKey] as T;
        if (returnValue == null)
        {
            lock (this)
            {
                returnValue = HttpContext.Current.Cache[cacheKey] as T;
                if (returnValue == null)
                {
                    returnValue = creator(creatorArgs);
                    if (returnValue == null)
                    {
                        throw new Exception("Attempt to cache a null reference");
                    }
                    HttpContext.Current.Cache.Add(
                        cacheKey,
                        returnValue,
                        null,
                        System.Web.Caching.Cache.NoAbsoluteExpiration,
                        System.Web.Caching.Cache.NoSlidingExpiration,
                        CacheItemPriority.Normal,
                        null);
                }
            }
        }

        return returnValue;
    }
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Craig Shoemaker has made an excellent show on asp.net caching: http://polymorphicpodcast.com/shows/webperformance/

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1  
although it's not thread-safe –  Andreas Niedermair Jan 13 '10 at 8:47

I saw one pattern recently called Correct State Bag Access Pattern, which seemed to touch on this.

I modified it a bit to be thread-safe.

http://weblogs.asp.net/craigshoemaker/archive/2008/08/28/asp-net-caching-and-performance.aspx

private static object _listLock = new object();

public List List() {
    string cacheKey = "customers";
    List myList = Cache[cacheKey] as List;
    if(myList == null) {
        lock (_listLock) {
            myList = Cache[cacheKey] as List;
            if (myList == null) {
                myList = DAL.ListCustomers();
                Cache.Insert(cacheKey, mList, null, SiteConfig.CacheDuration, TimeSpan.Zero);
            }
        }
    }
    return myList;
}
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Couldn't two threads both get a true result for (myList==null)? Then, both threads make a call to DAL.ListCustomers() and insert the results into cache. –  frankadelic Jan 13 '10 at 1:24
    
Added some thread-safety. –  Seb Nilsson Jan 13 '10 at 8:43
4  
After the lock you need to check the cache again, not the local myList variable –  orip Sep 8 '10 at 8:20
1  
This was actually ok before your edit. No lock is needed if you use Insert to prevent exceptions, only if you want to make sure that DAL.ListCustomers is called once (though if the result is null, it'll be called every time). –  marapet Nov 28 '11 at 10:30

I have come up with the following extension method:

private static readonly object _lock = new object();

public static TResult GetOrAdd<TResult>(this Cache cache, string key, Func<TResult> action, int duration = 300) {
    TResult result;
    var data = cache[key]; // Can't cast using as operator as TResult may be an int or bool

    if (data == null) {
        lock (_lock) {
            data = cache[key];

            if (data == null) {
                result = action();

                if (result == null)
                    return result;

                if (duration > 0)
                    cache.Insert(key, result, null, DateTime.UtcNow.AddSeconds(duration), TimeSpan.Zero);
            } else
                result = (TResult)data;
        }
    } else
        result = (TResult)data;

    return result;
}

I have used both @John Owen and @user378380 answers. My solution allows you to store int and bool values within the cache aswell.

Please correct me if there's any errors or whether it can be written a little better.

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Nice approach, but what is with the magic number 300? –  Martin Capodici Aug 1 at 0:51
    
That's a default cache length of 5 miniutes (60 * 5 = 300 seconds). –  nfplee Aug 1 at 7:52
    
Great work, but I see one issue: if you have multiple caches, they will all share the same lock. To make it more robust, use a dictionary to retrieve the lock matched to the given cache. –  JoeCool Nov 25 at 21:36

This article from CodeGuru explains various cache locking scenarios as well as some best practices for ASP.NET cache locking:

Synchronizing Cache Access in ASP.NET

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I've wrote a library that solves that particular issue: Rocks.Caching

Also I've blogged about this problem in details and explained why it's important here.

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I modified @user378380's code for more flexibility. Instead of returning TResult now returns object for accepting different types in order. Also adding some parameters for flexibility. All the idea belongs to @user378380.

 private static readonly object _lock = new object();


//If getOnly is true, only get existing cache value, not updating it. If cache value is null then      set it first as running action method. So could return old value or action result value.
//If getOnly is false, update the old value with action result. If cache value is null then      set it first as running action method. So always return action result value.
//With oldValueReturned boolean we can cast returning object(if it is not null) appropriate type on main code.


 public static object GetOrAdd<TResult>(this Cache cache, string key, Func<TResult> action,
    DateTime absoluteExpireTime, TimeSpan slidingExpireTime, bool getOnly, out bool oldValueReturned)
{
    object result;
    var data = cache[key]; 

    if (data == null)
    {
        lock (_lock)
        {
            data = cache[key];

            if (data == null)
            {
                oldValueReturned = false;
                result = action();

                if (result == null)
                {                       
                    return result;
                }

                cache.Insert(key, result, null, absoluteExpireTime, slidingExpireTime);
            }
            else
            {
                if (getOnly)
                {
                    oldValueReturned = true;
                    result = data;
                }
                else
                {
                    oldValueReturned = false;
                    result = action();
                    if (result == null)
                    {                            
                        return result;
                    }

                    cache.Insert(key, result, null, absoluteExpireTime, slidingExpireTime);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    else
    {
        if(getOnly)
        {
            oldValueReturned = true;
            result = data;
        }
        else
        {
            oldValueReturned = false;
            result = action();
            if (result == null)
            {
                return result;
            }

            cache.Insert(key, result, null, absoluteExpireTime, slidingExpireTime);
        }            
    }

    return result;
}
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