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I need to do this to persist operations on the matrix as well. Does that mean that it needs to be passed by reference?

Will this suffice?

void operate_on_matrix(char matrix[][20]);

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up vote 31 down vote accepted

C does not really have multi-dimensional arrays, but there are several ways to simulate them. The way to pass such arrays to a function depends on the way used to simulate the multiple dimensions:

1) Use an array of arrays. This can only be used if your array bounds are fully determined at compile time, or if your compiler supports VLA's:


    #define ROWS 4
    #define COLS 5

    void func(int array[ROWS][COLS])
    {
      int i, j;

      for (i=0; i<ROWS; i++)
      {
        for (j=0; j<COLS; j++)
        {
          array[i][j] = i*j;
        }
      }
    }

    void func_vla(int array[rows][cols], int rows, int cols)
    {
      int i, j;

      for (i=0; i<rows; i++)
      {
        for (j=0; j<cols; j++)
        {
          array[i][j] = i*j;
        }
      }
    }

    int main()
    {
      int x[ROWS][COLS];

      func(x);
      func_vla(x, rows, cols);
    }

2) Use a (dynamically allocated) array of pointers to (dynamically allocated) arrays. This is used mostly when the array bounds are not known until runtime.


    void func(int** array, int rows, int cols)
    {
      int i, j;

      for (i=0; i<rows; i++)
      {
        for (j=0; j<cols; j++)
        {
          array[i][j] = i*j;
        }
      }
    }

    int main()
    {
      int rows, cols, i;
      int **x;

      /* obtain values for rows & cols */

      /* allocate the array */
      x = malloc(rows * sizeof *x);
      for (i=0; i<rows; i++)
      {
        x[i] = malloc(cols * sizeof *x[i]);
      }

      /* use the array */
      func(x, rows, cols);

      /* deallocate the array */
      for (i=0; i<rows; i++)
      {
        free(x[i]);
      }
      free(x);

    }

3) Use a 1-dimensional array and fixup the indices. This can be used with both statically allocated (fixed-size) and dynamically allocated arrays:


    void func(int* array, int rows, int cols)
    {
      int i, j;

      for (i=0; i<rows; i++)
      {
        for (j=0; j<cols; j++)
        {
          array[i*rows+j] = i*j;
        }
      }
    }

    int main()
    {
      int rows, cols;
      int *x;

      /* obtain values for rows & cols */

      /* allocate the array */
      x = malloc(rows * cols * sizeof *x);

      /* use the array */
      func(x, rows, cols);

      /* deallocate the array */
      free(x);

    }
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In the first way mentioned above, the code will not compile. "rows" and "cols" in lines 17 and 35 must change to "ROWS" and "COLS", respectively. – KZcoding May 27 '15 at 15:35
1  
void func_vla(int array[rows][cols], int rows, int cols) should be void func_vla(int rows, int cols, int array[rows][cols]) – Alter Mann Oct 12 '15 at 16:55

I don't know what you mean by "data dont get lost". Here's how you pass a normal 2D array to a function:

void myfunc(int arr[M][N]) { // M is optional, but N is required
  ..
}

int main() {
  int somearr[M][N];
  ...
  myfunc(somearr);
  ...
}
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5  
Random factoid: The reason N is required is because the computer needs to know how far along to increment the pointer for each "row". Really, all dimensions except the first one are necessary. C stores arrays as chunks of memory, with no delimiters. – Christian Mann Oct 12 '10 at 3:12
    
data dont get lost means without using malloc. Thanks for the help. – Shweta Oct 12 '10 at 3:19
    
@Christian Mann: Thats a good factoid. I happened to write an elaborate explanation on it today :-) stackoverflow.com/questions/3906777/… – Arun Oct 12 '10 at 5:30
    
It seems everyone is having problems with multi-dimensional arrays today. :) I wrote a similar explanation in another question too: stackoverflow.com/questions/3911244/… – casablanca Oct 12 '10 at 5:34

If your compiler does not support VLAs, you can do it in simple way by passing the 2d array as int* with row and col. In the receiving function regenerate the 1d array index from 2d array indexes.

int 
getid(int row, int x, int y) {
          return (row*x+y);
}
void 
printMatrix(int*arr, int row, int col) {
     for(int x = 0; x < row ; x++) {
             printf("\n");
             for (int y = 0; y <col ; y++) {
                 printf("%d  ",arr[getid(row, x,y)]);
             } 
     }                     
}

main()
{

   int arr[2][2] = {11,12,21,22};
   int row = 2, col = 2;

   printMatrix((int*)arr, row, col);

 }
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