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using System;

static class Utility<T, TReturn>
{
public static TReturn Change(T arg)
{
    // is there any solution to do this type casting but without dynamic keyword? 
    return (TReturn)(arg as dynamic);
}
}


  class Program
 {
   static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int i = 100;

    try
    {
        short s = Utility<int,short>.Change(i);
        Console.WriteLine(s);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex);
    }
}
 }
share|improve this question
    
what are you trying to achieve other than cast? Are you trying to avoid writing of (short)i; for the above example? –  shahkalpesh Oct 12 '10 at 3:59
    
it is just a trivial example. –  xport Oct 12 '10 at 4:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Absolutely. Here you go...

static class Utility<T, TReturn> {
        public static TReturn Change(T arg) {
            return (TReturn)Convert.ChangeType(arg, typeof(TReturn));
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, it works!! –  xport Oct 12 '10 at 3:59
    
@mattmc3, compared to dynamic, which one is better? –  xport Oct 12 '10 at 4:08
    
IMHO you should avoid dynamic as far as possible. The dynamic type is new in .Net 4 and removes compile-time type checking, making it dangerous ground to play in if you are used to type safety. –  Andre Luus Oct 12 '10 at 5:38
    
If I remember correctly, dynamic was introduced mainly for COM. –  Andre Luus Oct 12 '10 at 5:40
    
@Andre - at least in C#, you only lose the compile time type checking for the object declared as dynamic. In VB.NET, you lose compile time checking for all objects in scope as you have to turn Option Strict off. In reality, that's really not as bad as it sounds... think of a dynamic object as an alternate form of a Dictionary, and plenty of people who code in languages like Python, Ruby and Perl manage it just fine. –  mattmc3 Oct 12 '10 at 12:53

The solution to use Convert.ChangeType(object,Type) is not as flexible as the method using dynamic dispatch. Mainly because very few types implement IConvertible.

For instance, let say you want to convert from a value type to its nullable value type, this'll throw an exception. Here is an example::

Converter<short, short?> test1 = @short =>(short?)Convert.ChangeType(@short, typeof(short?));
test1(5);

This is non-generic code but it still proves the point that it'll blow up. Even more damning is that in this case the simple cast actually works. What you really need is a "smart" converter.

First off, we need to define what penalty you are willing to accept. If you are ready to invoke the DLR, it's probably your safest bet. That code is pretty much guaranteed to do the right thing. Since the call sites are cached, it'll actually end up performing really well if invoked enough.

I'm not going to pretend that there is an easy solution without. Your best bet is to start consider restricting the domain or range of the function. If you add a restriction on TResult to be IConvertible, for instance, then you don't have to worry about nullables. It'll still blow up on Enums though.

What you can do is build a converter delegate to handle this work for the return type. Then cache it by return type. You'll always box on value types, but its a lot less memory intensive then having to cache a delegate for every pairing the method is called upon. The logic will basically have to handle a couple of cases::

If(TReturn.IsValueType)
{
      If(TReturn.IsEnum) Cast to Enum base type using Convert.To(base), then to Enum.
      If(TReturn.IsNullable<>) Cast to Nullable<> generic type  using Convert.To(base), then to Nullable<T>
      If(TReturn.ISNullableEnum) Cast to Enum base type  using Convert.To(base), then to Nullable enum.
      Otherwise, just call Convert.To(TReturn) if that method exists.
}
If it's Iconvertible try calling Convert.ChangeType(object,Type) and cast as TReturn.
If no method has been found yet, try doing an explicit cast TReturn.

This'll still fail on code that implements conversion operators, that isn't IConvertible. but it's pretty close to what you want. To add support for conversion operators you'd have to cache a different delegate for every TInput,TReturn. This is a a bigger mess as you now run into worrying about trying to not box in some cases, where its easier to call boxing method, and requires a LOT of work to get right. Unless this is something that must be part of your code base, I'd avoid it for the cleaner, return (TReturn)(value as dynamic).

I do something like this for my DB layer, and I'm currently trying to replace the .NET 3.5 code with the simpler and less painful dynamic code. The above might perform slightly (AND Only slightly) better than the DLR code, and will not be as safe or as robust a solution as the DLR call.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Good explanation. –  xport Oct 12 '10 at 5:50
static class Utility<T, TReturn>
    where T : TReturn
{
    public static TReturn Change(T arg)
    {
        return (TReturn) arg;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your code doesn't work with the code the questioner provided. An int is not a short. The questioner is looking for a type conversion, not just a simple cast. –  mattmc3 Oct 12 '10 at 4:05

You can add the constraint T : TReturn. This won't work with your value types however:

using System;

static class Utility<T, TReturn>
    where T : TReturn
{
    public static TReturn Change(T arg)
    {
        return (TReturn)(arg);
    }
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string i = "100";

        try
        {
            object s = Utility<string, object>.Change(i);
            Console.WriteLine(s);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Even easier:

static class Utility<T, TReturn>
{
    static TReturn Change(T arg, Converter<TReturn, T> convert)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(arg != null);
        return convert(arg);
    }
}

Or try the following if you cannot accept a custom converter delegate:

static class Utility<T, TReturn>
{
    static TReturn Change(T arg)
    {
        return (TReturn) System.ComponentModel.TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T)).ConvertTo(arg, typeof(TReturn));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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