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Check whether a number x is nonzero using the legal operators except !.

Examples: isNonZero(3) = 1, isNonZero(0) = 0

Legal ops: ~ & ^ | + << >>

  • Note : Only bitwise operators should be used. if, else, for, etc. cannot be used.
  • Edit1 : No. of operators should not exceed 10.
  • Edit2 : Consider size of int to be 4 bytes.

int isNonZero(int x) {
return ???;
}

Using ! this would be trivial , but how do we do it without using ! ?

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5  
In C a non-zero number is non-zero. You haven't explicitly required the function to return 1 or 0 (but it is implied). Please explicitly define what your function will return. All you've given are 2 examples. –  PP. Oct 12 '10 at 7:51
4  
At least make the function return a bool to avoid answers like return x; (yes, I did it). A bit of context would also be interesting, why would you (anyone) need to write such a function with such constraints ? –  kriss Oct 12 '10 at 8:07
2  
Since when is + a bitwise operator? –  Oli Charlesworth Oct 15 '10 at 23:17
4  
do people really ask lame questions like this in interviews? Its total BS (excuse the use of overly technical jargon) –  pm100 Oct 15 '10 at 23:18
7  
The correct answer to this interview question is: What do you intend to do with the result? comparison? So why can't I do the comparison in the first place? I have better things to do with my time, you have failed to be selected to become my boss. –  mouviciel Oct 16 '10 at 7:24
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14 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

The logarithmic version of the adamk function:

int isNotZero(unsigned int n){
  n |= n >> 16;
  n |= n >> 8;
  n |= n >> 4;
  n |= n >> 2;
  n |= n >> 1;
  return n & 1;
};

And the fastest one, but in assembly:

xor eax, eax
sub eax, n  // carry would be set if the number was not 0
xor eax, eax
adc eax, 0  // eax was 0, and if we had carry, it will became 1

Something similar to assembly version can be written in C, you just have to play with the sign bit and with some differences.

EDIT: here is the fastest version I can think of in C:

1) for negative numbers: if the sign bit is set, the number is not 0.

2) for positive: 0 - n will be negaive, and can be checked as in case 1. I don't see the - in the list of the legal operations, so we'll use ~n + 1 instead.

What we get:

int isNotZero(unsigned int n){ // unsigned is safer for bit operations
   return ((n | (~n + 1)) >> 31) & 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Damn you I was going to post the same (except for the assembly part) :P +1 for THE solution –  George Oct 12 '10 at 6:47
4  
You are using 11 bitwise operators here. (5x|, 5x>>, 1x&). –  haylem Oct 12 '10 at 7:02
1  
"sub" isn't a bitwise op; a C++ solution would be easier if we \'re allowed -1 –  MSalters Oct 12 '10 at 7:18
1  
Why don't you just use neg? xor eax, eax; neg ecx; adc eax, 0; –  wj32 Oct 12 '10 at 7:58
    
@wj32 Yeah, this should work. I completely forgot which instructions affects CF. –  ruslik Oct 12 '10 at 8:38
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int isNonZero(unsigned x) {
    return ~( ~x & ( x + ~0 ) ) >> 31;
}

Assuming int is 32 bits (/* EDIT: this part no longer applies as I changed the parameter type to unsigned */ and that signed shifts behave exactly like unsigned ones).

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I guess this assumes 2nd complement representation (x + ~0 == x-1) –  Suma Oct 12 '10 at 7:50
    
On my Intel 32-bit Linux machine this function returns 0 or -1. If you subtract the answer from zero you would have a working function (on Intel 32-bit with gcc). –  PP. Oct 12 '10 at 7:58
    
@Suma: Yes, you are right –  usta Oct 12 '10 at 8:08
    
@PP: That is why I wrote "Assuming ... signed shifts behave exactly like unsigned ones". This shows that on Intel 32-bit with gcc they don't behave the same, which is perfectly OK. In fact there are more problems with this solution when x is of signed type. I shall elaborate about that shortly... –  usta Oct 12 '10 at 8:12
    
I changed the parameter type to unsigned not only because results of bitwise operations on signed types are implementation-defined when arguments have negative values, but also because adding and subtracting a non-zero constant cannot reliably be used either, as then there'll be at least one value of x with which + or - will result in overflow, and hence undefined behavior. –  usta Oct 12 '10 at 8:25
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Why make things complicated ?

int isNonZero(int x) {
    return x;
}

It works because the C convention is that every non zero value means true, as isNonZero return an int that's legal.

Some people argued, the isNonZero() function should return 1 for input 3 as showed in the example.

If you are using C++ it's still as easy as before:

int isNonZero(int x) {
    return (bool)x;
}

Now the function return 1 if you provide 3.

OK, it does not work with C that miss a proper boolean type.

Now, if you suppose ints are 32 bits and + is allowed:

int isNonZero(int x) {
    return ((x|(x+0x7FFFFFFF))>>31)&1;
}

On some architectures you may even avoid the final &1, just by casting x to unsigned (which has a null runtime cost), but that is Undefined Behavior, hence implementation dependant (depends if the target architecture uses signed or logical shift right).

int isNonZero(int x) {
    return ((unsigned)(x|(x+0x7FFFFFFF)))>>31;
}
share|improve this answer
    
because that's not the requirement. the requirement is to return 1 for non-zero –  Matt Ellen Oct 12 '10 at 8:06
1  
@Matt Ellen: let the OP write it would you ? When he wrote his question he stated Example: isNonZero(3) = 1, and example is not a requirement, never have been. –  kriss Oct 12 '10 at 8:17
4  
Ok, but your function doesn't fulfil the example either. –  Matt Ellen Oct 12 '10 at 8:26
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Bitwise OR all bits in the number:

int isByteNonZero(int x) {
    return ((x >> 7) & 1) |
           ((x >> 6) & 1) |
           ((x >> 5) & 1) |
           ((x >> 4) & 1) |
           ((x >> 3) & 1) |
           ((x >> 2) & 1) |
           ((x >> 1) & 1) |
           ((x >> 0) & 1);
}

int isNonZero(int x) {
  return isByteNonZero( x >> 24 & 0xff ) |
         isByteNonZero( x >> 16 & 0xff ) |
         isByteNonZero( x >> 8  & 0xff ) |
         isByteNonZero( x       & 0xff );
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure if creating a second function counts as a bitwise operator :) –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 6:30
    
I'm not a C person and I'm wondering why return x|(x&0); wouldn't work? Put that in your answer and I'll upvote. –  Spencer Ruport Oct 12 '10 at 6:34
1  
@Spencer Ruport: No, that won't work. That's a trivial identity; it will just return x. The result must be either 1 or 0. –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 6:38
1  
@JoshD: Why should the result be 1 or 0, in C every non zero values means true. The identity works perfectly :-) Try is in an if if you don't believe so. –  kriss Oct 12 '10 at 8:05
1  
@kriss: Yes, you're correct, but the question asks to return an integer with value either 0 or 1 as you can see from the function in the question. Otherwise you'd just return x and it would be a trivial problem. –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 8:15
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My solution is the following,

int isNonZero(int n)
{
    return ~(n == 0) + 2;
}
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== is not included in the list of legal operators. –  Martin Baulig Dec 13 '12 at 18:49
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basically you need to or the bits. For instance, if you know your number is 8 bits wide:

int isNonZero(uint8_t x)
{
    int res = 0;
    res |= (x >> 0) & 1;
    res |= (x >> 1) & 1;
    res |= (x >> 2) & 1;
    res |= (x >> 3) & 1;
    res |= (x >> 4) & 1;
    res |= (x >> 5) & 1;
    res |= (x >> 6) & 1;
    res |= (x >> 7) & 1;

    return res;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I think you have << where you mean to have >> –  benzado Oct 12 '10 at 6:51
1  
You are using 24 bitwise operators here. –  haylem Oct 12 '10 at 7:09
    
@haylem: When I wrote the answer, that wasn't one of the requirements –  Nathan Fellman Oct 12 '10 at 10:37
    
@benzado: thanks! fixed it –  Nathan Fellman Oct 12 '10 at 10:38
add comment
int is_32bit_zero( int x ) {
    return 1 ^ (unsigned) ( x + ~0 & ~x ) >> 31;
}
  1. Subtract 1. (~0 generates minus one on a two's complement machine. This is an assumption.)
  2. Select only flipped bit that flipped to one.
  3. Most significant bit only flips as a result of subtracting one if x is zero.
  4. Move most-significant bit to least-significant bit.

I count six operators. I could use 0xFFFFFFFF for five. The cast to unsigned doesn't count on a two's complement machine ;v) .

http://ideone.com/Omobw

share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't work as requested. it returns -1 for x=0, –  Matt Ellen Oct 12 '10 at 7:35
    
This will return 0 when x = 0x80000000 –  usta Oct 12 '10 at 7:36
    
also + and - are not allowed, if you allow them it's much more simple. –  kriss Oct 12 '10 at 8:10
1  
@kriss: + is explicitly allowed, see list. –  MSalters Oct 12 '10 at 11:01
    
@Matt: No, that is why there is a cast to unsigned. See ideone link. –  Potatoswatter Oct 12 '10 at 15:29
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Here's one that works regardless of the size of integers:

int isNonZero(int x) { return ~( (x & 0) == x ) + 2; }

Breakdown:

(x & 0) == x  // Returns 1 when x is 0, 0 when x <> 0

~( (x & 0) == x )  // Flips the bits, -2 when x is 0, -1 when x <> 0

~( (x & 0) == x ) + 2;  // OR by 2 to make results 0 or 1.
                        // (+ is bitwise OR or ADD, handy and underhanded)
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2  
If you can use ==, it's trivial. return ~(x==0)&1; –  aschepler Oct 15 '10 at 23:22
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The following function example should work for you.

bool isNonZero(int x)
{
    return (x | 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just make sure bool is recognized as a type. On Linux using gcc, I had to add these to my .c file: Just make sure bool is defined as a type. Else I did this using gcc on Linux, so bool would be recognized as a type. #define true 1 #define false 0 typedef char bool; –  octopusgrabbus Jun 13 '12 at 20:42
    
"| 0" is completely useless. All the work here is being done by the conversion to bool, if you're using a language with a real bool type, and not a typedef to an integer type. –  Nicolás Jun 2 '13 at 19:32
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My solution,though not quite related to your question

int isSign(int x)

{
//return 1 if positive,0 if zero,-1 if negative
return (x > 0) - ((x & 0x80000000)==0x80000000)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Comparison operators are not allowed as per the question; Only bitwise operators. –  Core Xii Oct 15 '10 at 7:25
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if(x)
     printf("non zero")
else
     printf("zero")
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This function will return x if it is non-zero, otherwise it will return 0.

int isNonZero(int x)
{
    return (x);
}
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int isNonZero(int x)

{

if (  x & 0xffffffff)
    return 1;
else
    return 0;

}

Let assume Int is 4 byte.

It will return 1 if value is non zero

if value is zero then it will return 0.

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2  
if statements aren't allowed in the problem. –  Nathan Fellman Oct 12 '10 at 10:39
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return ((val & 0xFFFFFFFF) == 0 ? 0:1);

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1  
That's still an if, just in shorthand! Besides, val & 0xFFFFFFFF == val. –  Simon MᶜKenzie Jun 14 '12 at 5:35
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