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isPositive - return true if x > 0, otherwise false

Example: isPositive(-1)

Legal ops: ! ~ & ^ | + << >>

Max ops: 8

Note: No conditional statements are allowed.

inline bool isPositive(int32_t x) {
  return ???;
}
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2  
Positive numbers are greater than zero; non-negative numbers include zero. Try a Google search 'define:positive' (one entry is: greater than zero; "positive numbers"). –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 12 '10 at 7:21
1  
@Konrad, well, 0 isn't positive. It seems proper. –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 7:22
    
yeah , it is not the usual definition of +'ve , but this was asked. –  Eternal Learner Oct 12 '10 at 7:22
2  
Eternal, we're not here to make your homework for you (stackoverflow.com/questions/3912112). Put some effort into it, and come back if you run into a dead end, showing what you have. –  sbi Oct 12 '10 at 7:28
1  
Do they really ask such questions in interview? –  Manoj R Oct 13 '10 at 6:03

11 Answers 11

up vote 4 down vote accepted
return !((x & 0x80000000) >> 31 | !x);
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2  
x & 0x80000000 discards all bits except the highest, yeilding only the signage bit, however the >> 31 makes this superflous on any system that guarentees bits on the MSB side to be zero when right shifting –  Necrolis Oct 12 '10 at 7:48
1  
you can use (1 << 31) instead of 0x80000000 –  lalli Oct 12 '10 at 7:51
    
I included the & 0x8000000 because I thought it made it easier to understand. (i.e., Shifting only highest bit over.) But you could write it as !(x >> 31 | !x);. –  Matthew Oct 12 '10 at 7:51
    
+1 to Necrolis, it will fail on my pentium, but the question says int is 4 bytes... –  lalli Oct 12 '10 at 7:52
2  
Better to use sizeof(int)*CHAR_BIT to determine the number of bits in an int and then use the correct mask and shift values. –  Paul R Oct 12 '10 at 8:11
int isPositive(int x)
{
 return (!(x & 0x80000000) & !!x); 
}
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Almost, you need to shift this right 31 bits to get 1 rather than 0x80000000 –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 7:32
1  
@JoshD: the result of ! is a bool which is mapped to 0 or 1. –  Henrik Oct 12 '10 at 7:34
1  
ooh, good call. This makes much of my code (and of the considerations for different platforms) completely redundant. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 12 '10 at 7:41
    
nuts. In his last question there was no !, I scalded my brain ... sorry for the invalid comment. –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 7:47
    
@JoshD - yeah , the previous question had no !. If we could substitute other operators for it m then the solution might be easy . –  Eternal Learner Oct 12 '10 at 7:49
int isPositive(int x) {
   return !((x&(1<<31)) | !x);
}

x&(1<<31 is to check if the number is negative.

!x is to check if the number is zero.

A number is positive if it's not negative and not zero.

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If I'm not mistaken, this fails for 0. –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 7:23
    
@JoshD: That's what the requirement says. –  codaddict Oct 12 '10 at 7:27
1  
@codaddict, he says return 1 for x > 0. So doesn't that mean return 0 for x == 0? Zero is not positive. –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 7:28
    
@codaddict - Should return 1 only if number is > 0. –  Eternal Learner Oct 12 '10 at 7:29
    
@JoshD: Thanks for pointing. Added the check. –  codaddict Oct 12 '10 at 7:32

Let's play with the sign bit: sign(~n) : 1 if n >= 0

To get rid of the case when n is 0: sign(~n + 1) : 1 if n > 0 or n = MIN_INT

So, we want the case when both functions return 1:

return ((~n & (~n + 1)) >> 31) & 1;
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+1 for great explanation.. –  Eternal Learner Oct 12 '10 at 7:52

Why not use XOR (^)?

Try this,

{
    return ((x>>31)&1)^(!!x); 
}

It can deal with the 0 case well.

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Assuming a two’s complement representation (not always the case!), this can be achieved by testing whether the most significant bit is set (in which case the number is negative).

Notice that the following code uses illegal operations (+, * and -) but these are for clarity and platform independence only. If you know more about your particular platform, e.g. that int is a 32 bit number, the relevant constants can be replaced by their numeric value.

// Will be 1 iff x < 0.
int is_neg = (x & (INT_MAX + 1)) >> (CHAR_BIT * sizeof(int) - 1);
// Will be 1 iff x != 0.
int is_not_zero = !!x;
return !is_neg & is_not_zero;
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Haven't done assembler for quite a while, but as far as I remember first digit in the word represents negative value e.g. 1000 is -8, hence if most significant bit is 1 the number is negative. So the answer is !(x>>31)

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if your working with a number system that uses the MSB as the signage bit, you can do:

int IsPositive(int x)
{
    return (((x >> 31) & 1) ^ 1) ^ !x;
}
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Won't this return 1 for 0? –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 7:24
    
seeing as there is no state for 0(ie: 0 is meant to be neither) its easier to have zero be treated as positive(imo), but it can be ammend to have it as negative(if needed) –  Necrolis Oct 12 '10 at 7:27
2  
Zero is not positive. The question is quite clear, return 1 if x > 0 return 0 otherwise. This does not do that. –  JoshD Oct 12 '10 at 7:30
    
You need to add a ^!x to handle the case where the parameter is 0: return (((x >> 31) & 1) ^ 1) ^ !x;. Note that even though the ! operator isn't really a bitwise operator, it's in the question's permitted operations. –  Michael Burr Oct 12 '10 at 7:41
    
@Micheal Burr: that would fix it :), corrected the answer –  Necrolis Oct 12 '10 at 7:46
int x,len;
x = 0x0fffffff;
len = (sizeof(x) * 8) - 2;

if ((x>>len))
 printf("Negative\n");
else
 printf("Positive\n");

X will be either int or char(Integral type).

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int isPositive(int x)

{

 return ( ! (x & ( 1 << 31 ) ) );

}

It will return 1 if given no is +ve and return 0 if given no is -ve

in this function we got sign bit if that is 1 it means no is -ve so we return 0 and if sign bit is 0 it means number is +ve so we return 1 .

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This function only gives correct values if value of x is greater than zero or less than zero. It does not give the required value of 0 if the value of x is zero. It will instead return a 1 when it is supposed to return a 1 only when the value of x is greater than zero. If value of x is less than one, meaning zero or a negative number, then the function is supposed to return a zero. –  Richard Chambers Sep 15 '12 at 2:44

return !((x >> 31) & 1); This is to check MSB.

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