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Possible Duplicate:
How to find out the arity of a method in Python

For example I have declared a function:

def sum(a,b,c):
    return a + b + c

I want to get length of arguments of "sum" function.
somethig like this: some_function(sum) to returned 3
How can it be done in Python?

Update:
I asked this question because I want to write a function that accepts another function as a parameter and arguments to pass it.

def funct(anotherFunct, **args): 
and I need to validate:
if(len(args) != anotherFuct.func_code.co_argcount):
    return "error"

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marked as duplicate by Mark Rushakoff, Preet Sangha, Wooble, wheaties, Chris B. Oct 12 '10 at 13:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You can see the source code, can't you? It's obviously 3. What more do you need to know? –  S.Lott Oct 12 '10 at 11:18
1  
why don't you try passing *args and return return len(args) or return len(filter(None, args)) !!! –  shahjapan Oct 12 '10 at 11:36
    
because I want to write a function that accepts another function as a parameter and arguments to pass it. def funct(anotherFunct, **args): and I need to validate: if(len(args) != anotherFuct.func_code.co_argcount): return "error" –  Zango Oct 12 '10 at 13:22
    
Please update your question to include all the background information. –  S.Lott Oct 12 '10 at 15:05
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If your method name is sum then sum.func_code.co_argcount will give you number of arguments.

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The inspect module is your friend; specifically inspect.getargspec which gives you information about a function's arguments:

>>> def sum(a,b,c):
...     return a + b + c
...
>>> import inspect
>>> argspec = inspect.getargspec(sum)
>>> print len(argspec.args)
3

argspec also contains details of optional arguments and keyword arguments, which in your case you don't have, but it's worth knowing about:

>>> print argspec
ArgSpec(args=['a', 'b', 'c'], varargs=None, keywords=None, defaults=None)
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import inspect

print len(inspect.getargspec(sum)[0])
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