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I've tried the following with no success:

function a(args){
    b(arguments);
}

function b(args){
    // arguments are lost?
}

a(1,2,3);

In function a, I can use the arguments keyword to access an array of arguments, in function b these are lost. Is there a way of passing arguments to another javascript function like I try to do?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 170 down vote accepted

Use .apply() to have the same access to arguments in function b, like this:

function a(args){
    b.apply(this, arguments);
}
function b(args){
   alert(arguments); //arguments[0] = 1, etc
}
a(1,2,3);​

You can test it out here.

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1  
+1 neat stuff ' –  Nikita Rybak Oct 12 '10 at 12:24
    
What could you do to pass a portion of the arguments? –  Brett Ryan Feb 17 '12 at 6:32
8  
@Brett - You can copy it into an array then manipulate that before passing it along, for example: var copy = [].slice.call(arguments); <remove what you want> myFunc.apply(this, copy); –  Nick Craver Feb 17 '12 at 11:18
8  
but using apply like this might screw up the scope of b (if it's some inner function of an object for example) –  vsync May 25 '13 at 22:47
2  
@vsync good point, but problem is easy to solve: pass the object as a first argument to apply. –  Tadeusz Łazurski Jul 27 '13 at 0:21

The explanation that none of the other answers supplies is that the original arguments are still available, but not in the original position in the arguments object.

The arguments object contains one element for each actual parameter provided to the function. When you call a you supply three arguments: the numbers 1, 2, and, 3. So, arguments contains [1, 2, 3].

function a(args){
    console.log(arguments) // [1, 2, 3]
    b(arguments);
}

When you call b, however, you pass exactly one argument: a's arguments object. So arguments contains [[1, 2, 3]] (i.e. one element, which is a's arguments object, which has properties containing the original arguments to a).

function b(args){
    // arguments are lost?
    console.log(arguments) // [[1, 2, 3]]
}

a(1,2,3);

As @Nick demonstrated, you can use apply to provide a set arguments object in the call.

The following achieves the same result:

function a(args){
    b(arguments[0], arguments[1], arguments[2]); // three arguments
}

But apply is the correct solution in the general case.

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This is how this could be done, without confusion about scopes:

this.trigger.bind(arguments)();
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