Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In which cases is it recommended to use virtual or abstract? Which is the more correct approach?

share|improve this question
84  
An abstract function has to be overridden while a virtual function may be overridden. –  Jordan Parmer Dec 24 '08 at 14:14
16  
You may override a Virtual method, but you must override an abstract one.Look here –  Eduardo Crimi Dec 24 '08 at 14:14
6  
Virtual functions can have a default /generic implementation in the base class. –  Martin.kv Dec 5 '12 at 4:50

12 Answers 12

up vote 716 down vote accepted

An abstract function can have no functionality. You're basically saying, any child class MUST give their own version of this method, however it's too general to even try to implement in the parent class. A virtual function, is basically saying look, here's the functionality that may or may not be good enough for the child class. So if it is good enough, use this method, if not, then override me, and provide your own functionality.

share|improve this answer
83  
And of course, if you override a virtual method, you can always refer to the parent method by calling base.Foo(...) –  Brann Jul 5 '11 at 0:45
50  
Thanks. This is a much better and easier explanation than anything in the MSDN documentation.(I had a headache after five minutes of reading this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa645767(v=vs.71).aspx) –  Jake Nov 1 '11 at 15:49
27  
Have you ever considered writing any books? You put this so elegantly. –  mmmeff Mar 13 '13 at 17:52
2  
Coming from Java, I was a bit perplexed why we need to make it virtual at all, until I read this: stackoverflow.com/a/1062126/193634 –  Rosdi Kasim Apr 17 '13 at 7:18
2  
@MeqDotNet It means if you like my implemention use me if NOT write your own better than me :) –  Usman Y Nov 6 '13 at 18:54

An abstract function has no implemention and it can only be declared on an abstract class. This forces the derived class to provide an implementation. A virtual function provides a default implementation and it can exist on either an abstract class or a non-abstract class. So for example:

public abstract class myBase
{
    //If you derive from this class you must implement this method. notice we have no method body here either
    public abstract void YouMustImplement();

    //If you derive from this class you can change the behavior but are not required to
    public virtual void YouCanOverride()
    { 
    }
}

public class MyBase
{
   //This will not compile because you cannot have an abstract method in a non-abstract class
    public abstract void YouMustImplement();
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Very useful to see sample code - helps make the various explanations in the answers much clearer. –  Simon Tewsi Jan 22 '13 at 21:39
    
I rolled back the answer to the previous version: the two classes are just examples, first class will compile since it's marked as abstract, second won't. Whether MyBase inherits from some other class or not is irrelevant. –  Dirk Jun 12 at 8:16
    
Doesn't your MyBase class have to implement the abstract class, somehow? I do not do this often, so I could be mistaken. I don't see that in your example. –  jp2code Jun 27 at 14:30
    
In the example above MyBase is showing what you cannot do. That is you cannot have an abstract method in a non abstract class –  JoshBerke Jun 28 at 15:27
  1. Only abstract classes can have abstract members.
  2. A non-abstract class that inherits from an abstract class must override its abstract members.
  3. An abstract member is implicitly virtual.
  4. An abstract member cannot provide any implementation (abstract is called pure virtual in some languages).
share|improve this answer
    
Number 3 isn't make sense to me. I think you meant to say "A member of an abstract class is implicitly virtual" (i.e., you can provide functionality for it without having to specify that it's virtual). –  Hobo Spider Jan 14 at 18:39
1  
No, I meant precisely what I wrote. A member of an abstract class can be virtual or non-virtual. An abstract member (i.e. abstract property, abstract method) is just like a virtual method, i.e. you can override it, except that it does not carry with itself a default implementation. –  Mehrdad Afshari Jan 15 at 7:03
    
Quoted "Abstract member is "implicitly" virtual." But I saw somewhere, someone had created abstract members by adding "virtual" keyword explicitly. Which is not necessary and infact it gave me a doubt until I read your answer. –  bonCodigo May 20 at 12:31

Abstract method: When a class contains an abstract method, that class must be declared as abstract. The abstract method has no implementation and thus, classes that derive from that abstract class, must provide an implementation for this abstract method.

Virtual method: A class can have a virtual method. The virtual method has an implementation. When you inherit from a class that has a virtual method, you can override the virtual method and provide additional logic, or replace the logic with your own implementation.

When to use what: In some cases, you know that certain types should have a specific method, but, you don't know what implementation this method should have.
In such cases, you can create an interface which contains a method with this signature. However, if you have such a case, but you know that implementors of that interface will also have another common method (for which you can already provide the implementation), you can create an abstract class. This abstract class then contains the abstract method (which must be overriden), and another method which contains the 'common' logic.

A virtual method should be used if you have a class which can be used directly, but for which you want inheritors to be able to change certain behaviour, although it is not mandatory.

share|improve this answer

You must always override an abstract function.

Thus:

  • Abstract functions - when the inheritor must provide its own implementation
  • Virtual - when it is up to the inheritor to decide
share|improve this answer

An abstract method is a method that must be implemented to make a concrete class. The declaration is in the abstract class (and any class with an abstract method must be an abstract class) and it must be implemented in a concrete class.

A virtual method is a method that can be overridden in a derived class using the override, replacing the behavior in the superclass. If you don't override, you get the original behavior. If you do, you always get the new behavior. This opposed to not virtual methods, that can not be overridden but can hide the original method. This is done using the new modifier.

See the following example:

public class BaseClass
{
    public void SayHello()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello");
    }


    public virtual void SayGoodbye()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Goodbye");
    }

    public void HelloGoodbye()
    {
        this.SayHello();
        this.SayGoodbye();
    }
}


public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public new void SayHello()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hi There");
    }


    public override void SayGoodbye()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("See you later");
    }
}

When I instantiate DerivedClass and call SayHello, or SayGoodbye, I get "Hi There" and "See you later". If I call HelloGoodbye, I get "Hello" and "See you later". This is because SayGoodbye is virtual, and can be replaced by derived classes. SayHello is only hidden, so when I call that from my base class I get my original method.

Abstract methods are implicitly virtual. They define behavior that must be present, more like an interface does.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think in your code sample that DerivedClass should inherit from BaseClass. –  Scott Ferguson Jul 4 '11 at 6:57
    
Whoops absolutely! –  Kamiel Wanrooij Jul 5 '11 at 19:46

Abstract methods are always virtual. They cannot have an implementation.

That's the main difference.

Basically, you would use a virtual method if you have the 'default' implementation of it and want to allow descendants to change its behaviour.

With an abstract method, you force descendants to provide an implementation.

share|improve this answer

I made this simpler by making some improvements on the following classes (from other answers):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace TestOO
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            BaseClass _base = new BaseClass();
            Console.WriteLine("Calling virtual method directly");
            _base.SayHello();
            Console.WriteLine("Calling single method directly");
            _base.SayGoodbye();

            DerivedClass _derived = new DerivedClass();
            Console.WriteLine("Calling new method from derived class");
            _derived.SayHello();
            Console.WriteLine("Calling overrided method from derived class");
            _derived.SayGoodbye();

            DerivedClass2 _derived2 = new DerivedClass2();
            Console.WriteLine("Calling new method from derived2 class");
            _derived2.SayHello();
            Console.WriteLine("Calling overrided method from derived2 class");
            _derived2.SayGoodbye();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }


    public class BaseClass
    {
        public void SayHello()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello\n");
        }
        public virtual void SayGoodbye()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Goodbye\n");
        }

        public void HelloGoodbye()
        {
            this.SayHello();
            this.SayGoodbye();
        }
    }


    public abstract class AbstractClass
    {
        public void SayHello()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello\n");
        }


        //public virtual void SayGoodbye()
        //{
        //    Console.WriteLine("Goodbye\n");
        //}
        public abstract void SayGoodbye();
    }


    public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
    {
        public new void SayHello()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hi There");
        }

        public override void SayGoodbye()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("See you later");
        }
    }

    public class DerivedClass2 : AbstractClass
    {
        public new void SayHello()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hi There");
        }
        // We should use the override keyword with abstract types
        //public new void SayGoodbye()
        //{
        //    Console.WriteLine("See you later2");
        //}
        public override void SayGoodbye()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("See you later");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Abstract Fuction:

  1. It can be declared only inside abstract class.
  2. It contains only method definition not the implementation.
  3. It must be overriden.

Virtual Function:

  1. It can be declared inside abstract as well as non abstract class.
  2. It contains method implementation.
  3. It may be overriden.
share|improve this answer

You basically use a virtual method when you want the inheritors to extend the functionality IF they want to.

You use abstract methods when you want the inheritors to implement the functionality (and in this case they have no choice)

share|improve this answer

To my understanding:

Abstract Methods:

Only the abstract class can hold abstract methods. Also the derived class need to implement the method and no implementation is provided in the class.

Virtual Methods:

A class can declare these and also provide the implementation of the same. Also the derived class need to implement of the method to override it.

share|improve this answer

The answer has been provided a number of times but the the question about when to use each is a design-time decision. I would see it as good practice to try to bundle common method definitions into distinct interfaces and pull them into classes at appropriate abstraction levels. Dumping a common set of abstract and virtual method definitions into a class renders the class unistantiable when it may be best to define a non-abstract class that implements a set of concise interfaces. As always, it depends on what best suits your applications specific needs.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.