Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What are all the programming languages that support XML literals natively or via extension? I know of VB.NET, Scala, and Factor. Any others?

share|improve this question
1  
It seems a little odd to count languages where somebody had to write an extension to the compiler in C++, but not count languages which were flexible enough that someone could write an extension to the language in itself. –  Ken Oct 12 '10 at 16:12
    
@Ken: +1, good point. Added Factor to the list. Thanks. –  missingfaktor Oct 12 '10 at 16:22
    
I don't know of a library that does it, but Common Lisp supports reader macros, which enables you to define your own syntax. –  Ken Oct 13 '10 at 14:12
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perl? I've never used it, but XML::Literal looks like a way to do XML literals in Perl.

share|improve this answer
add comment

ECMAscript.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Racket provides support for XML literals via XML Boxes. It also provides a very convenient S-expression based syntax for literal XML called X-expressions.

share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't look like XML literals. –  missingfaktor Oct 13 '10 at 4:42
    
You can directly write XML, using XML syntax. Here's a screenshot: ccs.neu.edu/home/samth/tmp/xmlbox.png –  Sam Tobin-Hochstadt Oct 13 '10 at 12:53
    
Nice. +1 :) –  missingfaktor Oct 14 '10 at 7:47
add comment

XSLT comes to mind. And yes, it is a programming language.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, fair enough! :) –  missingfaktor Oct 12 '10 at 14:43
add comment

Facebook published a PHP Extension that allows XML document fragments to be embedded in PHP code.

From the documentation page linked to above:

XHP is a PHP extension which augments the syntax of the language such that XML document fragments become valid PHP expressions. This allows you to use PHP as a stricter templating engine and offers much more straightforward implementation of reusable components.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.