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I want to search for all elements in an array which have the same starting set of characters as an element in another array. To make it clear:

@array = ("1a","9","3c");
@temp =("1","2","3");

I want to print only 1a and 3c. When I try to use the following program it prints out all the elements in the array instead of the two I want:

foreach $word (@temp)
{
    if( grep /^$word/ , @array) 
    {
        print $_;
    }
}

Any insights will be appreciated.

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2  
You should accept answers on some of your previous questions :) –  Colin Hebert Oct 12 '10 at 14:38
1  
Done. Had no idea I had to do that. –  omgpython Oct 12 '10 at 14:45
    
I would suggest you to declare variables with my, e.g. my @array = (..), foreach my $word (@temp) {..} and enable strict and warnings –  eugene y Oct 12 '10 at 17:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This answer will do what the OP wants as well as prevent any duplicates from printing on the screen through the use of a hash lookup.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @array = ("1a","9","3c","3c");
my @temp =("1","2","3");

my %dups_hash;

for my $w (@temp) {
    my ($match) = grep /^$w/, @array;

    # Need to check if $match is defined before doing the hash lookup.
    # This suppresses error messages for uninitialized values; if defined($match) is
    #  false, we short circuit and continue in the loop.
    if(defined($match) && !defined($dups_hash{$match})) {
        print $match;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works perfect. Thanks :) –  omgpython Oct 12 '10 at 15:42

If you want to match the elements pairwise, you can do it this way:

for my $i (0..$#array) {
    print $array[$i], "\n" if $array[$i] =~ /^$temp[$i]/
}

Otherwise you can use grep:

for my $i (0..$#array) {
    print "$array[$i]\n" if grep /^$temp[$i]/, @array;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I think that's too restrictive... The OP just said he wanted the element printed if it started with ANY of the elements in the other array. This imposes a one-to-one mapping. –  Platinum Azure Oct 12 '10 at 14:49
    
I can't undo my -1 for some reason... Can you do me a favor and edit this once more so I can undo it? –  Platinum Azure Oct 12 '10 at 15:07
    
The second one with grep still doesn't do what the OP wants. It prints the word you're using to grep instead of the value in the array. –  Weegee Oct 12 '10 at 15:24
    
@Weegee: corrected. –  eugene y Oct 12 '10 at 15:37
    
Nice. +1 from me. –  Weegee Oct 12 '10 at 15:40

For this sort of problem, the trick is to not scan the array more than you have to. I think Knuth wrote an entire book about that. :) Often, we get stuck in these situations because we stick too closely to the thing we tried first.

You can construct a single regular expression from all of the patterns that you want to search then scan the array once:

use Regexp::Assemble;

my @array = qw( 1a 9 3c );
my @temp  = qw( 1 2 3 );

my $ra = Regexp::Assemble->new;
$ra->add( @temp );

my $pattern = $ra->re;
print "pattern is [$pattern]\n";

print join ' ', grep /\A$pattern/ , @array;

This sort of thing works when you don't care which part of the pattern matches as long as it matches.

share|improve this answer

When I try to use the following program it prints out all the elements in the array instead of the two I want.

No it doesn't. As written, it prints nothing. With strict turned on, it prints "Global symbol "$temp" requires explicit package".

Fixing that obvious typo and turning on warnings, it prints "Use of uninitialized value $_ in print" twice.

Please don't waste our time, by showing us code that either doesn't compile doesn't do what you say. Don't retype code into this site - cut and paste the actual code that you're using.

The solution to your problem is going to be something like:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @array = ("1a","9","3c");
my @temp =("1","2","3");

foreach my $word (@temp) {
  print grep /^$word/ , @array;
}

But there are probably more efficient ways of doing it.

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1  
That will potentially result in duplicates (if @temp has multiple elements which start the same and could therefore match something in @array with each of them). –  Platinum Azure Oct 12 '10 at 14:54
    
Thanks for your answer. And I did copy paste "actual code and output". I don't use strict although I know its a standard. I just use perl for quick string manipulation although I know I should be using strict. –  omgpython Oct 12 '10 at 15:08
map { print "$_\n" } grep { my $a = $_; grep {$a =~ /^$_/} @temp } @array

Basically, the outer grep selects the elements for which 1 or more of the elements in @temp matches the inner regex-- that is, it selects all elements which start with one (or more) of the elements in @temp.

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umm..quick followup..What if you wanted to print only the first match? –  omgpython Oct 12 '10 at 15:29

To avoid blank lines if grep return empty list :

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.10.1;

my @array = qw(1a 9 3c 1g);
my @temp =(1, 2, 3);
foreach my $word(@temp) {
  my @l = grep{/^$word/}@array;
  say "@l" if @l;
}

Output :

1a 1g
3c
share|improve this answer
    
Can the downvoter explain why ? –  M42 Oct 14 '10 at 18:40

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