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I always like my figures to be placed in between text as opposed to the top or bottom of the page. I also like to talk about the figure before it is shown. So I am trying to have something like this:

By looking at Figure~\ref{fig:VCO} you can see that blah blah blah.

\begin{figure}[h]
\caption{VCO test circuit}\label{fig:VCO}
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=0.9\columnwidth]{figures/VCO_circuit.eps}
\end{center}
\end{figure}

This doesn't seem to work because it I guess it is referencing something that hasn't occurred yet? Does anyone have some simple solution? I am still very new to LaTeX.

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1  
It works like you use it. You can reference images before you define them. –  bastijn Oct 12 '10 at 16:37
    
Adam. It's generally a good idea to accept answers when you get them. It's good for your karma too. –  John Smith Oct 15 '10 at 19:16

5 Answers 5

I had same problem and I found this solution:

\graphicspath{{images/}}
\DeclareGraphicsExtensions{.jpg}

\makeatletter
\newenvironment{tablehere}
  {\def\@captype{table}}
  {}

\newenvironment{figurehere}
  {\def\@captype{figure}}
  {}
\makeatother

\begin{figurehere}
\includegraphics[height=5cm]{2-14aGa-Sur.jpg}
\caption{Hliněná destička s mapou severu Mezopotámie}
\label{fig:Ga-Sur}
\end{figurehere}

\graphicspath{{images/}} is there to declare your path to your pictures

\DeclareGraphicsExtensions{.jpg} is there for declare picture extension (multiple can be with comma (I think ;-))

\makeatletter
\newenvironment{tablehere}
  {\def\@captype{table}}
  {}

\newenvironment{figurehere}
  {\def\@captype{figure}}
  {}
\makeatother

is there for precise determination of position here

\begin{figurehere}
\includegraphics[height=5cm]{2-14aGa-Sur.jpg}
\caption{Hliněná destička s mapou severu Mezopotámie}
\label{fig:Ga-Sur}
\end{figurehere}

there is your picture with height specified and caption and label with it...

I hope it will help you ;-).

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I would add that latexmk (link) has proven invaluable to me over the years. This is a LaTeX "build" script written in Perl that is designed to compile .tex source files the right number of times. It parses the output from the latex command and performs dependency checking to ensure that the output document is kept up-to-date with the minimum number of passes. It can also deal with BibTeX bibliography files. Generally speaking, I invoke latexmk from either an Ant or GNU Make makefile and treat it just like I'm compiling C++ code, for example.

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Generally LaTeX needs at least two passes to resolve all its references, the first time to write them to an auxiliary file and the second time to put them into the final ps/pdf/dvi file. So it does not matter where the reference is.

A third pass will be needed, for example, if your document has a long table-of-contents which will screw up page numbers.

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1  
+1 for answer-ifying my comment more clearly than I could state it. The coffee hasn't kicked in yet, and it's been too long since I've actually used LaTeX. –  Matt Ball Oct 12 '10 at 16:42

It failed the first time because labeling and referencing are a two-pass process. The first time you processed your latex, all the labels were being indexed so the ref failed. The second time around, since the labels had been indexed the ref knew what it was actually referencing.

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Actually it seems like it is now working, I don't know what was going on!

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2  
It worked a second time because it was able to use the label data (stored in a separate file, IIRC) left from the first pass. For labels to work, you always need to run LaTeX twice. Also - next time, try asking on tex.stackexchange.com :) –  Matt Ball Oct 12 '10 at 16:39
1  
As a rule of thumb you can run latex or pdflatex command twice. It will get all your reference correct. –  Hemang Oct 12 '10 at 16:43

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