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Is it faster to declare variables inside a loop or outside a loop? For example:

' Declaration inside of the loop
For each item in items
    Dim newVariable as String = GetAString()
Next

' Declaration outside of the loop
Dim newVariable as String = String.Empty
For each item in items
    newVariable = GetAString()
Next

Which one is faster? Why? I assume the latter is faster because it is just reusing the same "pointer" to reference a new value behind the scenes instead of creating a new pointer each iteration, correct? Can someone elaborate?

Thanks

Updated:

The Compiler is intelligent enough to optimize the code when generating the Intermediate Language. It moves the variable declarations to the top of the method. Below, is the declartions within the IL after compilation:

 .locals init ([0] string newVariable2,
           [1] int32 i,
           [2] string newVariable,
           [3] int32 V_3,
           [4] int32 VB$CG$t_i4$S0)

Here's the entire IL for those interested:

.method private instance void  Form1_Load(object sender,
                                          class [mscorlib]System.EventArgs e) cil managed
{
  // Code size       55 (0x37)
  .maxstack  2
  .locals init ([0] string newVariable2,
           [1] int32 i,
           [2] string newVariable,
           [3] int32 V_3,
           [4] int32 VB$CG$t_i4$S0)
  IL_0000:  nop
  IL_0001:  ldc.i4.0
  IL_0002:  stloc.1
  IL_0003:  ldarg.0
  IL_0004:  callvirt   instance string WindowsApplication1.TestVariableDeclaration::getstring()
  IL_0009:  stloc.2
  IL_000a:  nop
  IL_000b:  ldloc.1
  IL_000c:  ldc.i4.1
  IL_000d:  add.ovf
  IL_000e:  stloc.1
  IL_000f:  ldloc.1
  IL_0010:  ldc.i4     0x989680
  IL_0015:  stloc.s    VB$CG$t_i4$S0
  IL_0017:  ldloc.s    VB$CG$t_i4$S0
  IL_0019:  ble.s      IL_0003
  IL_001b:  ldc.i4.0
  IL_001c:  stloc.3
  IL_001d:  ldarg.0
  IL_001e:  callvirt   instance string WindowsApplication1.TestVariableDeclaration::getstring()
  IL_0023:  stloc.0
  IL_0024:  nop
  IL_0025:  ldloc.3
  IL_0026:  ldc.i4.1
  IL_0027:  add.ovf
  IL_0028:  stloc.3
  IL_0029:  ldloc.3
  IL_002a:  ldc.i4     0x989680
  IL_002f:  stloc.s    VB$CG$t_i4$S0
  IL_0031:  ldloc.s    VB$CG$t_i4$S0
  IL_0033:  ble.s      IL_001d
  IL_0035:  nop
  IL_0036:  ret
} // end of method TestVariableDeclaration::Form1_Load
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1  
Maybe the compiler would optimize it? Best advice: fire up your IDE, instantiate a Stopwatch, and run a few thousand iterations of each version and see if there's a real difference. –  user414076 Oct 12 '10 at 18:20
    
Good idea! Brb with the results.. –  Moderator71 Oct 12 '10 at 18:22
3  
Are you trying to solve an actual performance problem, or are you just bored and toying with micro-optimizations that will never amount to a meaningful difference in a real world app? –  JohnFx Oct 12 '10 at 18:25
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I agree with Kevin's answer, define variables where they have meaning. Worry about optimizations if and when they present themselves and you know that a variable declaration is the issue. However, consider the following two pieces of code

void Test1()
{
    foreach (int i in Enumerable.Range(0,10))
    {
        string s = GetString();
        Console.WriteLine(s);
    }
}

void Test2()
{
    string s;
    foreach (int i in Enumerable.Range(0,10))
    {
        s = GetString();
        Console.WriteLine(s);
    }
}

And their generated IL:

Test1:
IL_0000:  ldc.i4.0    
IL_0001:  ldc.i4.s    0A 
IL_0003:  call        System.Linq.Enumerable.Range
IL_0008:  callvirt    System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<System.Int32>.GetEnumerator
IL_000D:  stloc.1     
IL_000E:  br.s        IL_0024
IL_0010:  ldloc.1     
IL_0011:  callvirt    System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<System.Int32>.get_Current
IL_0016:  pop         
IL_0017:  ldarg.0     
IL_0018:  call        UserQuery.GetString
IL_001D:  stloc.0     
IL_001E:  ldloc.0     
IL_001F:  call        System.Console.WriteLine
IL_0024:  ldloc.1     
IL_0025:  callvirt    System.Collections.IEnumerator.MoveNext
IL_002A:  brtrue.s    IL_0010
IL_002C:  leave.s     IL_0038
IL_002E:  ldloc.1     
IL_002F:  brfalse.s   IL_0037
IL_0031:  ldloc.1     
IL_0032:  callvirt    System.IDisposable.Dispose
IL_0037:  endfinally  
IL_0038:  ret         

Test2:
IL_0000:  ldc.i4.0    
IL_0001:  ldc.i4.s    0A 
IL_0003:  call        System.Linq.Enumerable.Range
IL_0008:  callvirt    System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<System.Int32>.GetEnumerator
IL_000D:  stloc.1     
IL_000E:  br.s        IL_0024
IL_0010:  ldloc.1     
IL_0011:  callvirt    System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<System.Int32>.get_Current
IL_0016:  pop         
IL_0017:  ldarg.0     
IL_0018:  call        UserQuery.GetString
IL_001D:  stloc.0     
IL_001E:  ldloc.0     
IL_001F:  call        System.Console.WriteLine
IL_0024:  ldloc.1     
IL_0025:  callvirt    System.Collections.IEnumerator.MoveNext
IL_002A:  brtrue.s    IL_0010
IL_002C:  leave.s     IL_0038
IL_002E:  ldloc.1     
IL_002F:  brfalse.s   IL_0037
IL_0031:  ldloc.1     
IL_0032:  callvirt    System.IDisposable.Dispose
IL_0037:  endfinally  
IL_0038:  ret   

See any difference? Those compiler guys, they're smart.

share|improve this answer
    
Using the stopwatch wasn't very useful. I got varying results, but looking at the IL was benificial. Essentially, the compiler moves the declaration to the top of the method within the IL. I'll edit my post to provide clarification of the IL. –  Moderator71 Oct 12 '10 at 19:08
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Neither. You are still creating a new string in each iteration of the loop, so they will be the same. Even if there is one, what you are taking about is unbelievable negligible in the big scope of things.

The scope declaration of the variable is what will change, and if you don't need it outside of the loop, then you should place it inside.

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I could imagine that the optimizer knows that these are the same and therefore they turn out to have the same performance. It might not though. You could either inspect the object code or measure.

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