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Absolute Beginner's Guide to Bit Shifting?

anyone can explain me that operator << or >>

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marked as duplicate by Greg Hewgill, Michael Petrotta, KennyTM, J.F. Sebastian, BrunoLM Oct 12 '10 at 19:33

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strange, google is up for me –  matt_h Oct 12 '10 at 19:03
2  
@turdfurguson: It's actually not that easy to search for "<<" in Google. –  Mark Byers Oct 12 '10 at 19:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 30 down vote accepted

The << and >> operators are bitshift operators. x << 1 shifts all the bits in x up to the next most significant bit, effectively multiplying by 2. More generally, x << n shifts the bits up n positions. To understand how this operation works it is easiest to look at the binary representation:

3         0000011 =  3
3 << 1    0000110 =  6
3 << 2    0001100 = 12
3 << 3    0011000 = 24

Similarly the >> operator shifts the bits down:

58        0111010 = 58
58 >> 1   0011101 = 29
58 >> 2   0001110 = 14
58 >> 3   0000111 = 7
58 >> 4   0000011 = 3
58 >> 5   0000001 = 1
58 >> 6   0000000 = 0
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3, in binary, is 11 and shifted to left one bit is 110, or 6 in decimal.

Think of a << b as a * (2 ** b)

>> is for right-shifting. Think of a >> b as a // (2 ** b)

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Python isn't BASIC, so a<<b would be equivalent to a*2**b or a*(2**b) (and likewise for >>. –  martineau Oct 12 '10 at 19:02
    
-1 Think of a << b as a * 2 ** b –  John Machin Oct 12 '10 at 19:02
    
@martineau of course, I was trying to write it in a more readable format. But you are right. Modified. –  Gabi Purcaru Oct 12 '10 at 19:03
    
Might be better expressed as a*pow(2,b). –  martineau Oct 12 '10 at 19:09
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@John Machin - Thanks for including the use of //. I think a lot of people are going to be surprised that / always means floating point division in Python3. –  Omnifarious Oct 12 '10 at 19:26

It's a bit shift, using a shifting operation.

Say you have a number, and looking at the lowest bits, you have 3:

0 0 1 1

If you shift it, you'll get 6, or:

0 1 1 0

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