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I am looking to do something like this. I remember I had some issues with values disappearing when programming like this. Is this type of structure "correct/valid" for a hash?

my %VAR;
$VAR{SCALAR} = "test scalar";
$VAR{ARRAY}[0] = "test array";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[0] = "test hash array 1";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[1] = "test hash array 2";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[2]{SOMEHASH} = "test hash array hash 1";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[2]{ANOTHERHASH} = "test hash array hash 2";
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2  
What happens when you run it with use strict; use warnings;? –  Ether Oct 12 '10 at 19:00
    
Do you have an example of these issues with values disappearing that you mention? –  CanSpice Oct 12 '10 at 19:29
    
If the structure best represents your data and it works then why not? (I don't happen to like code shouting at me, though.) Since this is obviously test data, there's no way we can help you with whether or not that's a good fit for your data. So, you'll have to be the judge. –  Axeman Oct 12 '10 at 21:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I see no reason why this wouldn't work. What issues are you seeing?

If you want to make sure your data structure looks like what you'd expect, I recommend something like Data::Dumper:

 # set up your %VAR hash as you like
 use Data::Dumper;
 print Dumper(\%VAR);

Should get something like:

$VAR1 = {
      'HASH' => {
                  'NAME' => [
                              'test hash array 1',
                              'test hash array 2',
                              {
                                'ANOTHERHASH' => 'test hash array hash 2',
                                'SOMEHASH' => 'test hash array hash 1'
                              }
                            ]
                },
      'ARRAY' => [
                   'test array'
                 ],
      'SCALAR' => 'test scalar'
    };
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This isn't exactly your question, but... if you're actually building the data structure in that fashion, you might consider a cleaner "literal" syntax:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my %VAR = (
  SCALAR => 'test scalar',
  ARRAY => [
    'test array',
  ],
  HASH => {
    NAME => [
      'test hash array 1',
      'test hash array 2',
      {
        SOMEHASH => 'test hash array hash 1',
        ANOTHERHASH => 'test hash array hash 2',
      },
    ],
  },
);

The main two reasons are readability and autovivification bugs. That's not incorrect perl, but it can lead to hard-to-debug issues, such as accidentally typing:

$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[1] = "test hash array 1";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[2] = "test hash array 2";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[2] = "test hash array 3";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[4] = "test hash array 4";

instead of

$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[1] = "test hash array 1";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[2] = "test hash array 2";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[3] = "test hash array 3";
$VAR{HASH}{NAME}[4] = "test hash array 4";

Which can't be an issue if you're using

$VAR{HASH}{NAME} = [
  undef,
  'test hash array 1',
  'test hash array 2',
  'test hash array 3',
  'test hash array 4',
];
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Often when people complain about disappearing values it's because they replaced them. When you assign to any part of a hash, you replace the value that was there previously even if it was a reference value:

use 5.010;

use Data::Dumper;

my %hash;

$hash{key} = { qw(a 1 b 2) };
say Dumper( \%hash );

$hash{key} = 5;
say Dumper( \%hash );

The output shows that the hash reference that was the second level is no longer there:

$VAR1 = {
          'key' => {
                     'a' => '1',
                     'b' => '2'
                   }
        };

$VAR1 = {
          'key' => 5
        };

You just have to be careful what and where you assign things, just like you do with any other variable.

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