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If I need to see if a certain value is in a string, is it better for performance to use the .test() method or the .search() method?

Example with .search():

var myRegExp = '/Orange/',
    myString = 'This is a string with the word "Orange."';

if(myString.search(myRegExp) != -1) {
    // Do code here
}

Example with .test():

var myRegExp = '/Orange/',
    myString = 'This is a string with the world "Orange."';

if(myRegExp.test(myString)) {
    // Do code here
}

Ultimately, what I'm doing is searching for a specific class name in string. The element would contain multiple classes, so I'd need to find if one of the classes is in it.

Example Markup:

<ul>
    <li class="expandable expanded">
        <ul>
            <li>Text</li>
        </ul>
    <li>
    <li class="expandable collapsed">
        <ul>
            <li>Text</li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

So, I'm adding a click event to the list items, if they have the class name "expanded" they need to behave one way, if they have the class name "collapsed" they need to behave another.

So, essentially, something like this.

element.addEventListener('click',function(e) {
    if( /* e.target has class name of expanded */ ) {
        // Do certain code
    } else {
        // Do other code
    }
}

I am using jQuery, and I am open to suggestions, but I feel this situation would be better served with native javascript. So, which method would give the best performance? Or is there another method that would be even better?

share|improve this question
2  
jsperf.com –  Craig Stuntz Oct 12 '10 at 19:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, if you are using jQuery, you can do this simply with

element.addEventListener('click',function(e) {
    if( $(e.target).hasClass('expanded' ) {
        // Do certain code
    } else {
        // Do other code
    }
}

If you don't want to create a jQuery object for whatever reason (e.g. performance) you could use this function, adapted from the source of $().hasClass():

function hasClass ( el, selector ) {
    var className = " " + selector + " ";

    if ( (" " + el.className + " ").replace(/[\n\t]/g, " ").indexOf( className ) > -1 ) {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

You can then call this like so:

if ( hasClass(e.target, 'expanded') ) {

Personally, I would go for the jQuery approach if you already have it loaded.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I have the library loaded, but the page is pretty script intensive, so I'd like to optimize every last bit of performance I can. What this does tell me, though, is that instead of .test() or .search(), the jQuery team decided to use .indexOf() to see if the value is in the string or not, which I hadn't thought of, and may be the best performance route. –  RussellUresti Oct 12 '10 at 19:20
    
@RusselUrest What this answer should be telling you is: don't worry about doing this yourself, just use the hasClass() function –  Josh Stodola Oct 12 '10 at 19:21
2  
A comparison between jQuery and pure JS solutions: jsperf.com/pure-js-hasclass-vs-jquery-hasclass @Josh This function is not the same as the jQuery hasClass function -- it doesn't require a jQuery selector object. –  lonesomeday Oct 12 '10 at 19:37
    
@lonesomday Regardless, it is redundant. He has the jQuery library loaded, there is no reason to roll your own function that performs an identical task. –  Josh Stodola Oct 12 '10 at 19:51
    
@Josh Well, performance -- not requiring a jQuery selection should be faster (slightly). (I wrote the test wrong originally, hence the odd performance stats in Chrome.) –  lonesomeday Oct 12 '10 at 19:56

test() returns true or false. search() returns the position of the match, or -1 if no match is found.

So, i think test() would be faster.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yep, through testing, it turns out test() is faster than search(). test() against indexOf() though is a bit more unclear. indexOf() is faster for most browsers by about 10%, but in Chrome, test() is faster by over 50%, so I guess it depends on who uses your site. –  RussellUresti Oct 13 '10 at 15:47
    
Nice, every little performance increase helps. –  mac Oct 14 '10 at 8:36

I had same question, after doing some readings I have identified that using native string method indexOf is the best method on performance perspective. This test proofs that also. So apporpriate way would be

var searchStr = 'Orange',
    myString = 'This is a string with the world "Orange."';

if(myString.indexOf(searchStr) != -1) {
    // Do code here
}

Although this question is somewhat old it is still useful. I have found that this question is also has good explanations.

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