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How can I see what is not in the table... I know I know...can only see what is there but come on!!!

So!!

select * from ORDER where State IN ('MA','PA','GA','NC')       

So I will get MA and PA but I want to see GA and NC....

NOT IN will return NY,NJ,CT ect.... I just want to see what is in the ( )

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6  
This makes no sense. Your query as posted will show you all records where the 'STATE' matches one of the values in the list. How will you not get GA and NC? Can you post your table, query, and results? –  JNK Oct 12 '10 at 20:04
2  
If you are constructing or executing the query, shouldn't you know what is in the ( )? What exactly is the point of this? –  NullUserException Oct 12 '10 at 20:05
2  
BTW: "ORDER" is a terrible name for a SQL table given that it is a keyword." –  JohnFx Oct 12 '10 at 20:07
2  
Ummm.... What? Need some example data to counteract the stream of consciousness I'm reading for a question.... –  OMG Ponies Oct 12 '10 at 20:09
    
My understanding of the question is: For a given list of states (MA, PA, GA, NC), which ones do not exist in the Order table? - In his case, GA and NC. –  RedFilter Oct 12 '10 at 20:13

4 Answers 4

It looks like you are missing a single quote ' in front of GA.

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My understanding of the question is: For a given list of states, which ones do not exist in the Order table?

This will show you what states out of the four listed below have no corresponding records in the Order table:

select distinct s.State
from
(
    select 'MA' as State
    union all
    select 'PA'
    union all
    select 'GA'
    union all
    select 'NC'
) s
left outer join [Order] o on s.State = o.State
where o.State is null
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+1 - This is a great guess at what OP is after. –  JNK Oct 12 '10 at 20:16
    
I Agree... This is probably the best, though I would ditch the Distinct and use group by, personal preference. –  Nicholas Mayne Oct 12 '10 at 20:40

I'm going to try to read between the lines a little here:

;with cteStates as (
    select 'MA' as state
    union all
    select 'PA'
    union all 
    select 'GA'
    union all
    select 'NC'
)
select s.state, count(o.state) as OrderCount
    from cteStates s
        left join [order] o
            on s.state = o.state
    group by s.state
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Are you just trying to find out which states there are except for those four? If so:

SELECT DISTINCT State FROM dbo.ORDER WHERE State NOT IN ('MA', 'PA', 'GA', 'NC')
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I don't think that's the question. –  NullUserException Oct 12 '10 at 20:06
    
@NullUserException - It's exceptionally hard to tell, though! –  JNK Oct 12 '10 at 20:09

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