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I have the following repository that I use for unit testing:

public class MyTestRepository<T>
{
    private List<T> entities = new List<T>();

    public IQueryable<T> Entities
    {
        get { return entities.AsQueryable(); }
    }

    public T New()
    {
        //return what here???
    }

    public void Create(T entity)
    {
        entities.Add(entity);
    }

    public void Delete(T entity)
    {
        entities.Remove(entity);
    }
}

What do I return in the New() method?

I have tried this:

    public T New()
    {
        return (T) new Object();
    }

But that gives me the following exception when I run my unit test:

System.InvalidCastException: Unable to cast object of type 'System.Object' to type 'MyCustomDomainType'.

Any idea on how to implement the New() method?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You could add a constraint for the T type parameter:

public class MyTestRepository<T> where T : new() 

and return new T(); in the method.

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Yes - that works. Thanks for all the answers guys. I'm going to mark this answer as the correct answer because it got the most up-votes. –  thd Oct 13 '10 at 19:42

You should change your repository definition by adding the new() constraint, like this:

public class MyTestRepository<T> where T : new()
{
    ...
}

This constrains types that can be used with MyTestRepository to those that have a default constructor. Now, in your New() method you can do:

public T New()
{
    return new T();
}
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Assuming type T has a public / default constructor, would this not correct the exception?

public T New()
{
    return new T();
}
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1  
You can't assume, you have to enforce it using new() (as others have mentioned). –  OJ. Oct 12 '10 at 22:41

That won't work as you're just creating an object, nothing else. How about creating the object with Activator:

return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));

See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.activator.aspx

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1  
Although this works, I would rather use "where T : new()" and return new T() as others are suggesting. –  steinar Oct 12 '10 at 22:27
    
In cases like this any use of reflection is an indication you're doing something wrong :-) (more often than not). –  OJ. Oct 12 '10 at 22:42
    
As mentioned, I agree that his is not the way to go since the where condition can be used to ensure that the type can be newed. In other cases, reflection would be valid. –  steinar Oct 12 '10 at 22:45

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