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I have a bash script that is being used in a CGI. The CGI sets the $QUERY_STRING environment variable by reading everything after the ? in the URL. For example, http://example.com?a=123&b=456&c=ok sets QUERY_STRING=a=123&b=456&c=ok.

Somewhere I found the following ugliness:

b=$(echo "$QUERY_STRING" | sed -n 's/^.*b=\([^&]*\).*$/\1/p' | sed "s/%20/ /g")

which will set $b to whatever was found in $QUERY_STRING for b. However, my script has grown to have over ten input parameters. Is there an easier way to automatically convert the parameters in $QUERY_STRING into environment variables usable by bash?

Maybe I'll just use a for loop of some sort, but it'd be even better if the script was smart enough to automatically detect each parameter and maybe build an array that looks something like this:

${parm[a]}=123
${parm[b]}=456
${parm[c]}=ok

How could I write code to do that?

share|improve this question
    
I just noticed that I'm actually stuck on Bash 3. Does anyone have a simple, secure solution that will not involve associative arrays? –  User1 Oct 13 '10 at 16:30
1  
See my edited answer for an alternative to associative arrays (also be sure to read the page I linked to ( BashFAQ/006 ). –  Dennis Williamson Oct 19 '10 at 1:32
    
this link will help you to solve your issue easily stackoverflow.com/questions/17021640/… –  amar Jun 11 '13 at 5:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Try this:

saveIFS=$IFS
IFS='=&'
parm=($QUERY_STRING)
IFS=$saveIFS

Now you have this:

parm[0]=a
parm[1]=123
parm[2]=b
parm[3]=456
parm[4]=c
parm[5]=ok

In Bash 4, which has associative arrays, you can do this (using the array created above):

declare -A array
for ((i=0; i<${#parm[@]}; i+=2))
do
    array[${parm[i]}]=${parm[i+1]}
done

which will give you this:

array[a]=123
array[b]=456
array[c]=ok

Edit:

To use indirection in Bash 2 and later (using the parm array created above):

for ((i=0; i<${#parm[@]}; i+=2))
do
    declare var_${parm[i]}=${parm[i+1]}
done

Then you will have:

var_a=123
var_b=456
var_c=ok

You can access these directly:

echo $var_a

or indirectly:

for p in a b c
do
    name="var$p"
    echo ${!name}
done

If possible, it's better to avoid indirection since it can make code messy and be a source of bugs.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the parm array generation. But all methods presented to loop that array fail to properly handle repeated keys. Each occurrence will overwrite the previous. For example, a=1&a=2&a=x would result in parm[a]=x –  MestreLion Aug 9 '11 at 20:44
    
@MestreLion: You can add logic to deal with the possibility of repeated keys, but you would need to decide how you want to deal with them. You could do first-precedent or last-precedent or some method of accumulation. –  Dennis Williamson Aug 11 '11 at 22:14

you can break $QUERY down using IFS. For example, setting it to &

$ QUERY="a=123&b=456&c=ok"
$ echo $QUERY
a=123&b=456&c=ok
$ IFS="&"
$ set -- $QUERY
$ echo $1
a=123
$ echo $2
b=456
$ echo $3
c=ok

$ array=($@)

$ for i in "${array[@]}"; do IFS="=" ; set -- $i; echo $1 $2; done
a 123
b 456
c ok

And you can save to a hash/dictionary in Bash 4+

$ declare -A hash
$ for i in "${array[@]}"; do IFS="=" ; set -- $i; hash[$1]=$2; done
$ echo ${hash["b"]}
456
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the set -- $var trick.. very neat ;) –  MestreLion Aug 9 '11 at 20:36

I packaged the sed command up into another script:

$cat getvar.sh

s='s/^.*'${1}'=\([^&]*\).*$/\1/p'
echo $QUERY_STRING | sed -n $s | sed "s/%20/ /g"

and I call it from my main cgi as:

id=`./getvar.sh id`
ds=`./getvar.sh ds`
dt=`./getvar.sh dt`

...etc, etc - you get idea.

works for me even with a very basic busybox appliance (my PVR in this case).

share|improve this answer
    
👎 for the unquoted $QUERY_STRING. You really, really must use double quotes around the variable. –  tripleee Feb 23 at 8:50

A nice way to handle CGI query strings is to use Haserl which acts as a wrapper around your Bash cgi script, and offers convenient and secure query string parsing.

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Following the correct answer, I've done myself some changes to support array variables like in this other question. I added also a decode function of which I can not find the author to give some credit.

Code appears somewhat messy, but it works. Changes and other recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

function cgi_decodevar() {
    [ $# -ne 1 ] && return
    local v t h
    # replace all + with whitespace and append %%
    t="${1//+/ }%%"
    while [ ${#t} -gt 0 -a "${t}" != "%" ]; do
        v="${v}${t%%\%*}" # digest up to the first %
        t="${t#*%}"       # remove digested part
        # decode if there is anything to decode and if not at end of string
        if [ ${#t} -gt 0 -a "${t}" != "%" ]; then
            h=${t:0:2} # save first two chars
            t="${t:2}" # remove these
            v="${v}"`echo -e \\\\x${h}` # convert hex to special char
        fi
    done
    # return decoded string
    echo "${v}"
    return
}

saveIFS=$IFS
IFS='=&'
VARS=($QUERY_STRING)
IFS=$saveIFS

for ((i=0; i<${#VARS[@]}; i+=2))
do
  curr="$(cgi_decodevar ${VARS[i]})"
  next="$(cgi_decodevar ${VARS[i+2]})"
  prev="$(cgi_decodevar ${VARS[i-2]})"
  value="$(cgi_decodevar ${VARS[i+1]})"

  array=${curr%"[]"}

  if  [ "$curr" == "$next" ] && [ "$curr" != "$prev" ] ;then
      j=0
      declare var_${array}[$j]="$value"
  elif [ $i -gt 1 ] && [ "$curr" == "$prev" ]; then
    j=$((j + 1))
    declare var_${array}[$j]="$value"
  else
    declare var_$curr="$value"
  fi
done
share|improve this answer

To bring this up to date, if you have a recent Bash version then you can achieve this with regular expressions:

q="$QUERY_STRING"
re1='^(\w+=\w+)&?'
re2='^(\w+)=(\w+)$'
declare -A params
while [[ $q =~ $re1 ]]; do
  q=${q##*${BASH_REMATCH[0]}}       
  [[ ${BASH_REMATCH[1]} =~ $re2 ]] && params+=([${BASH_REMATCH[1]}]=${BASH_REMATCH[2]})
done

If you don't want to use associative arrays then just change the penultimate line to do what you want. For each iteration of the loop the parameter is in ${BASH_REMATCH[1]} and its value is in ${BASH_REMATCH[2]}.

Here is the same thing as a function in a short test script that iterates over the array outputs the query string's parameters and their values

#!/bin/bash
QUERY_STRING='foo=hello&bar=there&baz=freddy'

get_query_string() {
  local q="$QUERY_STRING"
  local re1='^(\w+=\w+)&?'
  local re2='^(\w+)=(\w+)$'
  while [[ $q =~ $re1 ]]; do
    q=${q##*${BASH_REMATCH[0]}}
    [[ ${BASH_REMATCH[1]} =~ $re2 ]] && eval "$1+=([${BASH_REMATCH[1]}]=${BASH_REMATCH[2]})"
  done
}

declare -A params
get_query_string params

for k in "${!params[@]}"
do
  v="${params[$k]}"
  echo "$k : $v"
done          

Note the parameters end up in the array in reverse order (it's associative so that shouldn't matter).

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