Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to avoid (most of the) warnings of Netbeans 6.9.1, and I have a problem with the 'Leaking this in constructor' warning.

I understand the problem, calling a method in the constructor and passing "this" is dangerous, since "this" may not have been fully initialized.

It was easy to fix the warning in my singleton classes, because the constructor is private and only called from the same class.

Old code (simplified):

private Singleton() {
  ...
  addWindowFocusListener(this);
}

public static Singleton getInstance() {

  ...
  instance = new Singleton();
  ...
}

New code (simplified):

private Singleton() {
  ...
}

public static Singleton getInstance() {

  ...
  instance = new Singleton();
  addWindowFocusListener( instance );
  ...
}

This fix is not working if the constructor is public and can be called from other classes. How is it possible to fix the following code:

public class MyClass {

  ...
  List<MyClass> instances = new ArrayList<MyClass>();
  ...

  public MyClass() {
    ...
    instances.add(this);
  }

}

Of course I want a fix which does not require to modify all my codes using this class ( by calling an init method for instance).

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Since you make sure to put your instances.add(this) at the end of the constructor you should IMHO be safe to tell the compiler to simply suppress the warning (*). A warning, by its nature, doesn't necessarily mean that there's something wrong, it just requires your attention.

If you know what you're doing you can use a @SuppressWarnings annotation. Like Terrel mentioned in his comments, the following annotation does it as of NetBeans 6.9.1:

@SuppressWarnings("LeakingThisInConstructor")

(*) Update: As Isthar pointed out in his comment a situation like this is not necessarily safe. It "is only 'safe' in a single-threaded setting. From JLS 7 17.5: "An object is considered to be completely initialized when its constructor finishes. A thread that can only see a reference to an object after that object has been completely initialized is guaranteed to see the correctly initialized values for that object's final fields". No such guarantee if you leak this to another thread in the constructor! Also 'at the end of the constructor' may be reordered by the VM."

See also Isthar's answer further below for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not a standard java warning, this is a Netbeans-warning. So adding @SuppressWarnings does not help. –  asalamon74 Oct 13 '10 at 8:30
    
@asalamon: I see. Tant pis. And netbeans in turn, doesn't it provide any option to turn off specific warnings? Eclipse does. –  chiccodoro Oct 13 '10 at 11:53
    
I can turn off all the 'leaking this in constructors' warnings. I don't know how to turn it off only in a single class. –  asalamon74 Oct 13 '10 at 14:39
9  
The correct annotation is @SuppressWarnings("LeakingThisInConstructor") –  Terrel Shumway Nov 30 '10 at 15:55
3  
This is only 'safe' in a single-threaded setting. From JLS 7 17.5: "An object is considered to be completely initialized when its constructor finishes. A thread that can only see a reference to an object after that object has been completely initialized is guaranteed to see the correctly initialized values for that object's final fields". No such guarantee if you leak this to another thread in the constructor! Also 'at the end of the constructor' may be reordered by the VM. –  Ishtar Apr 13 at 19:27

The best options you have :

  • Extract your WindowFocusListener part in another class (could also be inner or anonymous) . The best solution, this way each class has a specific purpose.
  • Ignore the warning message.

Using a singleton as a workaround for a leaky constructor is not really efficient.

share|improve this answer
    
The class in the first example was already a Singleton. –  asalamon74 Oct 13 '10 at 8:35
    
@asalamon74, but I suppose that the second wasn't. Wanting a singleton with a public constructor is a non-sense, so I guessed you tried to apply the singleton pattern as a workaround. –  Colin Hebert Oct 13 '10 at 8:38
    
Of course I don't want a Singleton with a public constructor. I just wanted to show an example where I was able to fix the problem (this was the Singleton) and a different example where I was unable to fix it (this is the non-Singleton example). –  asalamon74 Oct 13 '10 at 8:41
    
@asalamon74, Ho, then I didn't understood how you got to the singleton solution. Anyway, as I said in my answer, you should extract your listener, that's the best way. –  Colin Hebert Oct 13 '10 at 8:45
    
Reading all these again, I'd prefer this answer over mine. For the second bullet point, however, I think that adding a @SuppressWarnings is better than ignoring the warnings. You know, broken windows... if you have 17 warnings in your code, you don't remember how many and which of them you want to ignore. –  chiccodoro Nov 6 '12 at 7:15

[Remark by chiccodoro: An explanation why/when leaking this can cause issues, even if the leaking statement is placed last in the constructor:]

Final field semantics is different from 'normal' field semantics. An example,

We play a network game. Lets make a Game object retrieving data from the network and a Player object that Listens to events from the game to act accordingly. The game object hides all the network details, the player is only interested in events:

import java.util.*;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class FinalSemantics {

    public interface Listener {
        public void someEvent();
    }

    public static class Player implements Listener {
        final String name;

        public Player(Game game) {
            name = "Player "+System.currentTimeMillis();
            game.addListener(this);//Warning leaking 'this'!
        }

        @Override
        public void someEvent() {
            System.out.println(name+" sees event!");
        }
    }

    public static class Game {
        private List<Listener> listeners;

        public Game() {
            listeners = new ArrayList<Listener>();
        }

        public void start() {
            Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1).execute(new Runnable(){

                @Override
                public void run() {
                    for(;;) {
                        try {
                            //Listen to game server over network
                            Thread.sleep(1000); //<- think blocking read

                            synchronized (Game.this) {
                                for (Listener l : listeners) {
                                    l.someEvent();
                                }
                            }
                        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                            e.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                }            
            });
        }

        public synchronized void addListener(Listener l) {
            listeners.add(l);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Game game = new Game();
        game.start();
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        //Someone joins the game
        new Player(game);
    }
}
//Code runs, won't terminate and will probably never show the flaw.

Seems all good: access to the list is correctly synchronized. The flaw is that this example leaks the Player.this to Game, which is running a thread.

Final is quite scary:

...compilers have a great deal of freedom to move reads of final fields across synchronization barriers...

This pretty much defeats all proper synchronizing. But fortunately

A thread that can only see a reference to an object after that object has been completely initialized is guaranteed to see the correctly initialized values for that object's final fields.

In the example, the constructor writes the objects reference to the list. (And thus has not been completely initialized yet, since the constructor did not finish.) After the write, the constructor is still not done. It just has to return from the constructor, but let's assume it hasn't yet. Now the executor could do its job and broadcast events to all the listeners, including the not yet initialized player object! The final field of the player (name) may not be written, and will result in printing null sees event!.

share|improve this answer
    
As mentioned in our discussion to my answer: A very strong point! Ishtar's answer might be slightly easier to understand after having read his initial comment "This is only 'safe' in a single-threaded setting. (...) No such guarantee if you leak this to another thread in the constructor! Also 'at the end of the constructor' may be reordered by the VM." –  chiccodoro Apr 16 at 6:48
1  
BTW - maybe the problem of the OP is a design issue. The fact that an object registers itself somewhere when being created could indicate that its constructor does something it is not meant for: The constructor should initialize the instance and not modify any other objects. –  chiccodoro Apr 16 at 6:53

This is a good case of where a Factory that created instances of your class would helpful. If a Factory was responsible for creating instances of your class, then you would have a centralized location where the constructor is called, and it would be trivial to add a required init() method to your code.

Regarding your immediate solution, I would suggest that you move any calls that leak this to the last line of your constructor, and then suppress them with an annotation once you've "proved" that it is safe to do so.

In IntelliJ IDEA, you can suppress this warning with the following comment right above the line:
//noinspection ThisEscapedInObjectConstruction

share|improve this answer

One can write:

addWindowFocusListener(Singleton.this);

This will prevent NB from showing the warning.

share|improve this answer

The annotation @SuppressWarnings("LeakingThisInConstructor") applicable only to the class an not to the constructor itself.

Solusion I would suggest: create private method init(){/* use this here*/} and call it from the constructor. The NetBeans won't warn you.

share|improve this answer
1  
This isn't a solution. This is avoiding the real problem. –  initialZero May 27 '11 at 21:43
    
@initialZero - honestly, the same holds for my answer. Re-reading all these answers, I think that Colin's answer is the best. –  chiccodoro Nov 6 '12 at 7:12

Using a nested class (as suggested by Colin) is probably your best option. Here's the pseudocode:

private Singleton() {
  ...
}

public static Singleton getInstance() {

  ...
  instance = new Singleton();
  addWindowFocusListener( new MyListener() );
  ...

  private class MyListener implements WindowFocusListener {
  ...
  }
}
share|improve this answer

There is no need of separate listener class.

public class Singleton implements WindowFocusListener {

    private Singleton() {
      ...
    }    

    private void init() {
      addWindowFocusListener(this);
    }

    public static Singleton getInstance() {    
      ...
      if(instance != null) {
        instance = new Singleton();
        instance.init();
      }
      ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe in GUI programming this is okay but in general this code isn't thread-safe. –  Tvaroh Dec 25 '13 at 9:58

Say you originally had a class like this that used itself as an ActionListener and therefore you end up calling addActionListener(this) which generates the warning.

private class CloseWindow extends JFrame implements ActionListener {
    public CloseWindow(String e) {
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
        setLayout(new BorderLayout());

        JButton exitButton = new JButton("Close");
        exitButton.addActionListener(this);
        add(exitButton, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
    }

    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        String actionCommand = e.getActionCommand();

        if(actionCommand.equals("Close")) {
            dispose();
        }
    }
}

As @Colin Hebert mentioned, you could separate the ActionListener out into its own class. Of course this would then require a reference to the JFrame that you want to call .dispose() on. If you'd prefer not to fill up your variable name space, and you want to be able to use the ActionListener for multiple JFrames, you could do it with getSource() to retrieve the button followed by a chain of getParent() calls to retrieve the Class that extends JFrame and then call getSuperclass to make sure it's a JFrame.

private class CloseWindow extends JFrame {
    public CloseWindow(String e) {
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
        setLayout(new BorderLayout());

        JButton exitButton = new JButton("Close");
        exitButton.addActionListener(new ExitListener());
        add(exitButton, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
    }
}

private class ExitListener implements ActionListener {
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        String actionCommand = e.getActionCommand();
        JButton sourceButton = (JButton)e.getSource();
        Component frameCheck = sourceButton;
        int i = 0;            
        String frameTest = "null";
        Class<?> c;
        while(!frameTest.equals("javax.swing.JFrame")) {
            frameCheck = frameCheck.getParent();
            c = frameCheck.getClass();
            frameTest = c.getSuperclass().getName().toString();
        }
        JFrame frame = (JFrame)frameCheck;

        if(actionCommand.equals("Close")) {
            frame.dispose();
        }
    }
}

The above code will work for any button that is a child at any level of a class which extends JFrame. Obviously if your object just is a JFrame it's just a matter of checking that class directly rather than checking the super class.

Ultimately using this method you're getting a reference to something like this: MainClass$CloseWindow which has the super class JFrame and then you're casting that reference to JFrame and disposing of it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.