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When I try to run the following:

​<div id="container">
     //This is a 200x200 image        
     <img src="http://dummyimage.com/200x200/CCC/000" />
</div>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

with CSS:

​#container {
    background:#000;
}

​I get a DIV with a black background container like I want.

However, when I add the following to the CSS:

#container img {
   float:left;
}

It seems like the container does not detect the image inside it and its height is set to minimum (can be seen here: http://jsfiddle.net/wc4GJ/ ).

How come floating the image to the left mess up the container DIV's height?

Thanks,

Joel

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2 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Add overflow:auto; to #container

(Explanations below)

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Why should adding an image (with a fixed width and height) be considered as an overflow for the DIV? –  Joel Oct 13 '10 at 8:09
4  
Because floating takes the element out from the flow, which means that the parent element no longer has any content in it that determines its height. Adding overflow: hidden/auto; to the parent ensures that it wraps its contents properly. –  PatrikAkerstrand Oct 13 '10 at 8:14
    
I agree with you ^^ –  MatTheCat Oct 13 '10 at 8:16
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You need to add a clearing div after the img:

​<div id="container">
     //This is a 200x200 image        
     <img src="http://dummyimage.com/200x200/CCC/000" />
     <div class="clearing"></div>
</div>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

And in CSS:

.clearing { clear: both; }
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What is the reason for this? Shouldn't the container DIV recognize an image inside of it, even though it is floated to the left? –  Joel Oct 13 '10 at 8:06
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