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I have some data which represents a sizes of particles. I want to plot the frequency of each binned-size of particles as a histogram, but scale the frequency but the size of the particle (so it represents total mass at that size.)

I can plot a histogram fine, but I am unsure how to scale the Y-axis by the X-value of each bin.

e.g. if I have 10 particles in the 40-60 bin, I want the Y-axis value to be 10*50=500.

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I would create a custom variable that would hold the "scale" values and use that to produce a bar plot. –  Roman Luštrik Oct 13 '10 at 10:04
    
Total mass is a volume concept (i.e. count*size). And you try to represent it in one dimension by the heights of "histogram" . My answer below, keeps the counts as the heights of bars but scales the width by the size. So you get the total mass represented by the area of the bins. Your object is not a histogram anymore and people will have find it difficult to interpret. If you still want your original object, just calculate your total mass and plot with barplot as Roman suggested. –  VitoshKa Oct 13 '10 at 10:55
    
Total mass at a given size is what needs to be plotted so it is comparable to the output of a chromatography machine where the absorbance is proportional to the total mass off stuff coming through at a particular mass of particle. This is certainly less intuitive, but its more relevant! –  Nick Oct 13 '10 at 16:12
    
It's a valid quantity to plot. To use bars to represent it is somewhat misleading because the area of each bar has no meaning. A dotchart is a perfect candidate for your case. I've updated my answer. –  VitoshKa Oct 14 '10 at 7:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You would better use barplot in order to represent the total mass by the area of the bins (i.e. height gives the count, width gives the mass):

sizes <- 3:10   #your sizes    
part.type <- sample(sizes, 1000, replace = T)  #your particle sizes  

count <- table(part.type)  
barplot(count, width = size)  

If your particle sizes are all different, you should first cut the range into appropriate number of intervals in order to create part.type factor:

part <- rchisq(1000, 10)  
part.type <- cut(part, 4)  

count <- table(part.type)  
barplot(count, width = size)  

If the quantity of interest is only total mass. Then, the appropriate plot is the dotchart. It is also much clearer comparing to the bar plot for a large number of sizes:

part <- rchisq(1000, 10)
part.type <- cut(part, 20)

count <- table(part.type)
dotchart(count)

Representing the total mass with bins would be misleading because the area of the bins is meaningless.

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1  
There is a function truehist in MASS that makes the areas of the bins meaningful. –  BondedDust Oct 29 '13 at 20:54

if you really want to use the mid point of each bin as a scaling factor:

d<-rgamma(100,5,1.5) # sample
z<-hist(d,plot=FALSE) # make histogram, i.e., divide into bins and count up
co<-z$counts # original counts of each bin
z$counts<-z$counts*z$mids # scaled by mids of the bin

plot(z, xlim=c(0,10),ylim=c(0,max(z$counts))) # plot scaled histogram
par(new=T)
plot(z$mids,co,col=2,  xlim=c(0,10),ylim=c(0,max(z$counts))) # overplot original counts

instead, if you want to use the actual value of each sample point as a scaling factor:

d<-rgamma(100,5,1.5)
z<-hist(d,plot=FALSE)
co<-z$counts # original counts of each bin
z$counts<-aggregate(d,list(cut(d,z$breaks)),sum)$x # sum up the value of data in each bin

plot(z, xlim=c(0,10),ylim=c(0,max(z$counts))) # plot scaled histogram
par(new=T)
plot(z$mids,co,col=2,  xlim=c(0,10),ylim=c(0,max(z$counts))) # overplot original counts
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Just hide the axes and replot them as needed.

# Generate some dummy data
datapoints <- runif(10000, 0, 100)

par (mfrow = c(2,2))

# We will plot 4 histograms, with different bin size
binsize <- c(1, 5, 10, 20)

for (bs in binsize)
    {
    # Plot the histogram. Hide the axes by setting axes=FALSE
    h <- hist(datapoints, seq(0, 100, bs), col="black", axes=FALSE, 
        xlab="", ylab="", main=paste("Bin size: ", bs))
    # Plot the x axis without modifying it
    axis(1)
    # This will NOT plot the axis (lty=0, labels=FALSE), but it will return the tick values
    yax <- axis(2, lty=0, labels=FALSE)
    # Plot the axis by appropriately scaling the tick values
    axis(2, at=yax, labels=yax/bs)
    }
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