Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way given a column, which table it belongs using SQL Query?

share|improve this question
    
you mean, when you have the results of an SQL statement, know from which tables column are computed? I suppose that this is not possible, but maybe I am wrong, then what RDBMS are you using (for other people)? –  Benoit Oct 13 '10 at 10:47
2  
Please clarify. "It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, ... and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form." IMO. Notwithstanding the fact that 4 people have tried to do so! –  Martin Smith Oct 13 '10 at 11:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

yes, Assuming this is SQL server db, you can check the below query -

select [name], object_name(id) from sys.columns where [name] like '%columnname%'

the object_name(id) will give you the table name for your columnname specified.

share|improve this answer

Try

SELECT OBJECT_NAME(id) FROM syscolumns WHERE [name] = 'mycolumn'

share|improve this answer
    
Use the sys catalog views in SQL Server 2005 and newer - sys.columns instead of syscolumns –  marc_s Oct 13 '10 at 10:54

Using the syscolumns table (and assuming you just have the column name), you can figure out which tables contain a column with that name. But beyond that you might be stuck.

share|improve this answer
    
Use the sys catalog views in SQL Server 2005 and newer - sys.columns instead of syscolumns –  marc_s Oct 13 '10 at 10:54

You can try something like this using Sql Server 2005+

SELECT OBJECT_NAME(c.OBJECT_ID) TableName, c.name ColumnName
FROM sys.columns c
WHERE c.name = '<column name>'
share|improve this answer

If you are trying to figure out which table a particular column in a query came from then the best bet is to alias all columns at the time you write queries. I would not accept any code in a code review that doesn't do this because it is a pain to figure out later.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.