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I'm currently developing a solution and have designed it in a way such that it strongly implements the strategy/provider pattern. As such the solution exposes a number of interfaces and contains default implementations of these interfaces which can be replaced via a DI type methodology.

Where the host application uses a number of these interfaces it is expecting to handle certain exceptions that may occur, for example IDataRetriever interface has a method SomeDataType GetData(int timeout);and the host can handle some custom exceptions such as DataRetrievalTimeoutException or NetworkConnectionException.

My question is, what is the best way to mark up the interface class such that when a developer implements it they would know that certain exceptions should be thrown and would be handled by the host?

At the moment I have just added the exception xml tags to the methods xml comment - does this suffice?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The XML tags (and any other documentation you want to write) are basically the closest you've got in "vanilla" .NET at the moment.

You might want to look at Code Contracts which lets you annotate your interface with contracts, which can include exceptions, preconditions etc.

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I think the best way to provide this information is in the XML documentation that you would provide for each interface. There you can specify what Exception is thrown by the method so that the host can handle that error.

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I would suggest defining exception classes within the interface, and specifying that no exceptions which do not derive from those should be allowed to escape unless the CPU is on fire or other such drastic situation exists (even then, it might not be a bad idea to have an explicitly-defined IWoozle.SystemCorruptionException so that if a Pokemon handler simply catches, logs, and throws out the exception, the log will reflect that at least someone thought the exception was important).

I consider Microsoft's recommendation to avoid defining custom exception types to be unfortunate, since it means that there's no clean way to distinguish whether IEnumerator<T>.MoveNext() throws an InvalidOperationException because the underlying collection was altered during enumeration, or whether the internal processing of IEnumerator<T>.MoveNext() encounters an InvalidOperationException and simply lets it bubble up to the caller. If instead, IEnumerator<T>.MoveNext() threw an IEnumerator.InvalidatedEnumeratorException in the former case, then any InvalidOperationException which escaped would have to represent the latter case.

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+1 for Pokemon handler. Best laugh of the day. –  Sleeper Smith Apr 18 '13 at 5:34

You cannot in an interface. You CAN in a base class.

public interface IFoo
{    
  /// <summary>
  /// Lol
  /// </summary>
  /// <exception cref="FubarException">Thrown when <paramref name="lol"> 
  /// is <c>null</c></exception>
  /// <remarks>Implementors, pretty please throw FE on lol 
  /// being null kthx</remarks>
  void Bar(object lol);
}

vs.

public abstract BaseFoo
{    
  /// <summary>
  /// Lol
  /// </summary>
  /// <exception cref="FubarException">Thrown when <paramref name="lol"> 
  /// is <c>null</c></exception>
  public void Bar(object lol)
  {
    if(lol == null)
      throw new FubarException();
    InnerBar(lol);
  }

  /// <summary>
  /// Handles execution of <see cref="Bar" />.
  /// </summary>
  /// <remarks><paramref name="lol"> is guaranteed non-<c>null</c>.</remarks>
  protected abstract void InnerBar(object lol);
}
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1  
If you want to ensure that Bar doesn't leak any unexpected exception types, I think the non-virtual Bar method needs to wrap the call to InnerBar in a try-catch block, which should catch and wrap any exceptions other than those specified in the interface. –  supercat Feb 2 '12 at 20:05

Another strategy if you can't support a generic base class, is extension method implementations.

public static void ThisMethodShouldThrow(this Iinterface obj)
{
     if(obj.ConditionToThrowIsMet) throw new...
}

This has the benefit of allowing you to not require an inheritance chain.

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Should this not be up to whatever class implements the Interface?

Eg if I take your Interface and implement my own class, with a method GetData, I could be 'getting' data from anywhere. Lets say it was a web service then the types of exceptions that could be thrown could be different to those if I was 'getting' data from local file system.

So in my implementation I would implement (and document) those exceptions specific to the implmentation so that whatever code is using the implementation could handle them. How those exception are handled may be very specific to the implementation, say I am consuming them in a web app as opposed to a desktop app.

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1  
The purpose of an interface is to allow different implementations to be interchangeable. If an implementation of IEnumerable/IEnumerator which read data from an AcmeDatabase were to allow some type of AcmeDatabaseException to escape, a caller would have no way of knowing whether that represented a transient communications hiccup, or whether it meant that the CPU was on fire. The IEnumerable contract fails to supply any useful guidance, alas, but that's no reason other interfaces shouldn't do better, e.g. specifying that... –  supercat Feb 2 '12 at 16:39
1  
...any attempt to perform of IWoozle.wozzle which is unable to complete but leaves the system state unaltered should throw IWoozle.CleanFailureException or a derivative thereof. If the state of the IWoozle may have changed but is, from the IWoozle's perspective likely valid, IWoozle.PossibleChangeException. If the state of the IWoozle is likely corrupt, but corruption is confined to that object, IWoozle.CorruptObjectedException. Do not allow any exception other than the above to escape unless the CPU is on fire or other such drastic condition exists. –  supercat Feb 2 '12 at 16:45
    
Ok, I get what your saying I think. So basically if I took Gouldos interface and implemented GetData, which behind the scenes I have coded to retrieve data via a web service, and some web service specific exception occurs :-), then I would have to roll this exception up and pass any details back through the raising of say the NetworkConnectionException? And the caller would then rely on retrieving information about the underlying exception via the inner exception property....something like that? –  SleepyBoBos Feb 23 '12 at 7:15
    
Precisely. One of the reasons for using interfaces is to allow a caller to do certain things with an object without having to worry about its particulars. If some code calls IDataRetriever.GetData and it can't get it, there may be some human somewhere who would care about whether it failed because of a "DNS Host Not Found", or an "ICMP Host Unreachable", but the immediate calling code may not have any clue that the object is trying to fetch data from the Internet, and would have no concept of how any of those conditions might differ. –  supercat Feb 23 '12 at 15:54

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