Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given is the following code:

function two() {
    return "success";
}

function one() {
    two();
    return "fail";
}

If you test the code by calling function one(), you will always get "fail".

The question is, how can I return "success" in function one() by only calling function two()?

Is that even possible?

Regards

share|improve this question
2  
@Paniyar If he doesn't understand it, he doesn't understand it. Just because it's simple for you doesn't mean it's universally simple. –  mattbasta Oct 13 '10 at 13:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can't make a function return from the function that called it in Javascript (or many other languages, afaik). You need logic in one() to do it. E.g.:

 function one() {
     return two() || "fail";
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Thats plain wrong, "success" || "fail" will fail, neither are boolean –  smirkingman Oct 13 '10 at 13:17
4  
It's not wrong. According to the rules of JavaScript, as written by the Ancients of the Web, an or operator (||) will return the first argument if it does not evaluate to a 'falsy' value (e.g. false, undefined, null, 0, ""), otherwise it will evaluate and return it's second argument. –  andrewmu Oct 13 '10 at 13:23
1  
@smirkingman Actually, you're wrong. A string evaluates to a true boolean value in JS. Punch "success" || "fail" into any JS console and it will return "success". Know what you're talking about before you bash someone's response. –  mattbasta Oct 13 '10 at 13:23
    
Also, +1 to andrewmu for coming up with a creative response! –  mattbasta Oct 13 '10 at 13:25
    
And restore my rating to 0 while you're at it! –  andrewmu Oct 13 '10 at 13:25
function one() {
   return two();
}
share|improve this answer
function one() {    
    return two();
}
share|improve this answer

You could do it, using a try-catch Block, if your function one anticipates a probable non-local-return as well as function two like this using exceptions:

function two() {
  throw {isReturn : true, returnValue : "success"}
}


function one () {
  try {
    two()
  } catch(e) {
    if(e.isReturn) return e.returnValue;
  }
  return "fail";
 }

, I believe.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.