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I would like to handle a long press on a UITableViewCell to print a "quick access menu". Did someone already do this?

Particularly the gesture recognize on UITableView?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 234 down vote accepted

First add the long press gesture recognizer to the table view:

UILongPressGestureRecognizer *lpgr = [[UILongPressGestureRecognizer alloc] 
  initWithTarget:self action:@selector(handleLongPress:)];
lpgr.minimumPressDuration = 2.0; //seconds
lpgr.delegate = self;
[self.myTableView addGestureRecognizer:lpgr];
[lpgr release];

Then in the gesture handler:

-(void)handleLongPress:(UILongPressGestureRecognizer *)gestureRecognizer
{
    CGPoint p = [gestureRecognizer locationInView:self.myTableView];

    NSIndexPath *indexPath = [self.myTableView indexPathForRowAtPoint:p];
    if (indexPath == nil) {
        NSLog(@"long press on table view but not on a row");
    }
    else 
        if (gestureRecognizer.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateBegan) {
            NSLog(@"long press on table view at row %d", indexPath.row);
        }
        else {
            NSLog(@"gestureRecognizer.state = %d", gestureRecognizer.state);
        }
}

You have to be careful with this so that it doesn't interfere with the user's normal tapping of the cell and also note that handleLongPress may fire multiple times before user lifts their finger.

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1  
Awesome !!! Thanks a lot! But a last little question: Why is the method handleLongPress is call when the touch ended ??? –  foOg Oct 13 '10 at 15:15
    
It's not called when touch ends but can fire multiple times if the user keeps their finger on the cell for more than 4 seconds (in this example) before lifting it. –  Anna Oct 13 '10 at 15:19
71  
Correction: it fires multiple times to indicate the different states of the gesture (began, changed, ended, etc). So in the handler method, check the state property of the gesture recognizer to avoid doing the action at each state of the gesture. Eg: if (gestureRecognizer.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateBegan) .... –  Anna Oct 18 '10 at 15:12
    
tnx Anna Karenina,your answer helped me to deliver my task in time and moreever i tried in a different approach before seeing your code. now i solved it easily upon looking yours –  Dinakar Jun 22 '11 at 8:48
7  
Also confirm to UIGestureRecognizerDelegate protocol in class.h file –  Jayashankar Aug 9 '12 at 5:30

I've used Anna-Karenina's answer, and it works almost great with a very serious bug.

If you're using sections, long-pressing the section title will give you a wrong result of pressing the first row on that section, I've added a fixed version below (including the filtering of dummy calls based on the gesture state, per Anna-Karenina suggestion).

- (IBAction)handleLongPress:(UILongPressGestureRecognizer *)gestureRecognizer
{
    if (gestureRecognizer.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateBegan) {

        CGPoint p = [gestureRecognizer locationInView:self.tableView];

        NSIndexPath *indexPath = [self.tableView indexPathForRowAtPoint:p];
        if (indexPath == nil) {
            NSLog(@"long press on table view but not on a row");
        } else {
            UITableViewCell *cell = [self.tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath];
            if (cell.isHighlighted) {
                NSLog(@"long press on table view at section %d row %d", indexPath.section, indexPath.row);
            }
        }
    }
}
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Hi @marmor: I want to ask that is it possible to identify only a portion of a view which user touched? –  Manthan Mar 10 at 6:16
    
Hey, you can use hitTest for that (developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/uikit/reference/…). Check this answer for example on how to use: stackoverflow.com/a/2793253/819355 –  marmor Mar 10 at 10:53

Looks to be more efficient to add the recognizer directly to the cell as shown here:

Tap&Hold for TableView Cells, Then and Now

(scroll to the example at the bottom)

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7  
How can allocating a new gesture recognizer object for each row be more efficient than a single recognizer for the whole table? –  user2393462435 Dec 23 '11 at 17:50
3  
Remember though there is only a few cells created if dequeue is working correctly. –  Ants Feb 7 '12 at 22:55

I put together a little category on UITableView based on Anna Karenina's excellent answer.

Like this you'll have a convenient delegate method like you're used to when dealing with regular table views. Check it out:

//  UITableView+LongPress.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@protocol UITableViewDelegateLongPress;

@interface UITableView (LongPress) <UIGestureRecognizerDelegate>
@property(nonatomic,assign)   id <UITableViewDelegateLongPress>   delegate;
- (void)addLongPressRecognizer;
@end


@protocol UITableViewDelegateLongPress <UITableViewDelegate>
- (void)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView didRecognizeLongPressOnRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath;
@end



//  UITableView+LongPress.m

#import "UITableView+LongPress.h"

@implementation UITableView (LongPress)
@dynamic delegate;

- (void)addLongPressRecognizer {
    UILongPressGestureRecognizer *lpgr = [[UILongPressGestureRecognizer alloc]
                                          initWithTarget:self action:@selector(handleLongPress:)];
    lpgr.minimumPressDuration = 1.2; //seconds
    lpgr.delegate = self;
    [self addGestureRecognizer:lpgr];
}


- (void)handleLongPress:(UILongPressGestureRecognizer *)gestureRecognizer
{
    CGPoint p = [gestureRecognizer locationInView:self];

    NSIndexPath *indexPath = [self indexPathForRowAtPoint:p];
    if (indexPath == nil) {
        NSLog(@"long press on table view but not on a row");
    }
    else {
        if (gestureRecognizer.state == UIGestureRecognizerStateBegan) {
            // I am not sure why I need to cast here. But it seems to be alright.
            [(id<UITableViewDelegateLongPress>)self.delegate tableView:self didRecognizeLongPressOnRowAtIndexPath:indexPath];
        }
    }
}

If you want to use this in a UITableViewController, you probably need to subclass and conform to the new protocol.

It works great for me, hope it helps others!

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great! awesome use of categories, thanks –  MaKo Mar 4 at 11:38

Use the UITouch timestamp property in touchesBegan to launch a timer or stop it when touchesEnded got fired

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Thanks for your answer but how can i detect which row is concerned by the touch ? –  foOg Oct 13 '10 at 14:05
    
I might be wrong, but nothing is provided to help you do that. You'll have to get the indexes of the current visible cells with [tableView indexPathsForVisibleRows] and then, using some calculations (your tableView offset from the top + X times the rows) you'll know that the coordinates of your finger is on which row. –  Thomas Joulin Oct 13 '10 at 14:17
    
I'm sure that there is an easier way to do that, anyway if you have another idea, i'll be here :) –  foOg Oct 13 '10 at 14:32
    
I'd be glad to know too if something easier is possible. But I don't think there is, mostly because the is not the way Apple wants us to handle interactions... It looks like an Android way of thinking this "quick access menu". If it were my app, I'll handle it like the Twitter app. A swipe to the left displays the options –  Thomas Joulin Oct 13 '10 at 14:37
    
Yes, i thought about that, so if i really can't do it with a long press event, i'll use the swipe method. But, maybe someone in stack-overflow did it ... –  foOg Oct 13 '10 at 14:47

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