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I'd like to do base64 encoding and decoding, but I could not find any support from the iPhone SDK. How can I do base64 encoding and decoding with or without a library?

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1  
It's worth noting that the iOS7 SDK introduced the ability to do encode and decode Base64 data natively. Have a look at the NSData Class Reference –  Abizern Nov 24 '13 at 12:06
2  
Perhaps the accepted answer should be changed to one of the answers that points out that not only does iOS 7 do this natively, but Apple has exposed the previously private methods to do it in iOS versions going back to 4.0. The historically top-rated answers (including the accepted answer) really are not advisable anymore. They were great back in the day, but nowadays, it's probably a poor choice to use a third-party base-64 library. I posted a more contemporary answer, as have a few others. –  Rob Mar 15 at 2:14

19 Answers 19

up vote 63 down vote accepted

There's a nice code sample at the bottom of this post. Very self-contained...

BaseSixtyFour

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26  
Watch out! There's a nasty bug in the NSData category posted there. The line: realloc(bytes, length); is wrong; you need to take into account the return value of realloc. –  Nick Hutchinson Jun 17 '11 at 23:57

This is a good use case for Objective C categories.

For Base64 encoding:

#import <Foundation/NSString.h>

@interface NSString (NSStringAdditions)

+ (NSString *) base64StringFromData:(NSData *)data length:(int)length;

@end

-------------------------------------------

#import "NSStringAdditions.h"

static char base64EncodingTable[64] = {
  'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O', 'P',
  'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T', 'U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Y', 'Z', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f',
  'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v',
  'w', 'x', 'y', 'z', '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '+', '/'
};

@implementation NSString (NSStringAdditions)

+ (NSString *) base64StringFromData: (NSData *)data length: (int)length {
  unsigned long ixtext, lentext;
  long ctremaining;
  unsigned char input[3], output[4];
  short i, charsonline = 0, ctcopy;
  const unsigned char *raw;
  NSMutableString *result;

  lentext = [data length]; 
  if (lentext < 1)
    return @"";
  result = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity: lentext];
  raw = [data bytes];
  ixtext = 0; 

  while (true) {
    ctremaining = lentext - ixtext;
    if (ctremaining <= 0) 
       break;        
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++) { 
       unsigned long ix = ixtext + i;
       if (ix < lentext)
          input[i] = raw[ix];
       else
  input[i] = 0;
  }
  output[0] = (input[0] & 0xFC) >> 2;
  output[1] = ((input[0] & 0x03) << 4) | ((input[1] & 0xF0) >> 4);
  output[2] = ((input[1] & 0x0F) << 2) | ((input[2] & 0xC0) >> 6);
  output[3] = input[2] & 0x3F;
  ctcopy = 4;
  switch (ctremaining) {
    case 1: 
      ctcopy = 2; 
      break;
    case 2: 
      ctcopy = 3; 
      break;
  }

  for (i = 0; i < ctcopy; i++)
     [result appendString: [NSString stringWithFormat: @"%c", base64EncodingTable[output[i]]]];

  for (i = ctcopy; i < 4; i++)
     [result appendString: @"="];

  ixtext += 3;
  charsonline += 4;

  if ((length > 0) && (charsonline >= length))
    charsonline = 0;
  }     
  return result;
}

@end

For Base64 decoding:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@class NSString;

@interface NSData (NSDataAdditions)

+ (NSData *) base64DataFromString:(NSString *)string;

@end

-------------------------------------------

#import "NSDataAdditions.h"

@implementation NSData (NSDataAdditions)

+ (NSData *)base64DataFromString: (NSString *)string
{
    unsigned long ixtext, lentext;
    unsigned char ch, inbuf[4], outbuf[3];
    short i, ixinbuf;
    Boolean flignore, flendtext = false;
    const unsigned char *tempcstring;
    NSMutableData *theData;

    if (string == nil)
    {
        return [NSData data];
    }

    ixtext = 0;

    tempcstring = (const unsigned char *)[string UTF8String];

    lentext = [string length];

    theData = [NSMutableData dataWithCapacity: lentext];

    ixinbuf = 0;

    while (true)
    {
        if (ixtext >= lentext)
        {
            break;
        }

        ch = tempcstring [ixtext++];

        flignore = false;

        if ((ch >= 'A') && (ch <= 'Z'))
        {
            ch = ch - 'A';
        }
        else if ((ch >= 'a') && (ch <= 'z'))
        {
            ch = ch - 'a' + 26;
        }
        else if ((ch >= '0') && (ch <= '9'))
        {
            ch = ch - '0' + 52;
        }
        else if (ch == '+')
        {
            ch = 62;
        }
        else if (ch == '=')
        {
            flendtext = true;
        }
        else if (ch == '/')
        {
            ch = 63;
        }
        else
        {
            flignore = true; 
        }

        if (!flignore)
        {
            short ctcharsinbuf = 3;
            Boolean flbreak = false;

            if (flendtext)
            {
                if (ixinbuf == 0)
                {
                    break;
                }

                if ((ixinbuf == 1) || (ixinbuf == 2))
                {
                    ctcharsinbuf = 1;
                }
                else
                {
                    ctcharsinbuf = 2;
                }

                ixinbuf = 3;

                flbreak = true;
            }

            inbuf [ixinbuf++] = ch;

            if (ixinbuf == 4)
            {
                ixinbuf = 0;

                outbuf[0] = (inbuf[0] << 2) | ((inbuf[1] & 0x30) >> 4);
                outbuf[1] = ((inbuf[1] & 0x0F) << 4) | ((inbuf[2] & 0x3C) >> 2);
                outbuf[2] = ((inbuf[2] & 0x03) << 6) | (inbuf[3] & 0x3F);

                for (i = 0; i < ctcharsinbuf; i++)
                {
                    [theData appendBytes: &outbuf[i] length: 1];
                }
            }

            if (flbreak)
            {
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    return theData;
}

    @end
share|improve this answer
5  
If Obj-C is anything like C, you should be able to do this: static char base64EncodingTable[64] = "ABCDE[etc]789+/"; –  Artelius May 5 '09 at 10:19
    
when using base64StringFromData should the length should be the length of the NSData? I only getting the first 4 characters by using the NSData Length. Thanks –  hipplar Jun 10 '09 at 5:22
3  
I found why I was only getting 4 characters... There needs to be a } before the return for the while() loop. I would edit it but I doesn't look like i can. –  hipplar Jun 10 '09 at 23:05
3  
It's not an analyzer bug. Notice the code also attempts to access inbuf[3] which is beyond the bounds of that array. This code stinks. –  Mike Weller Nov 8 '11 at 7:44
1  
What does lenght value represent? –  MegaManX Jun 20 '12 at 11:04

A really, really fast implementation which was ported (and modified/improved) from the PHP Core library into native Objective-C code is available in the QSStrings Class from the QSUtilities Library. I did a quick benchmark: a 5.3MB image (JPEG) file took < 50ms to encode, and about 140ms to decode.

The code for the entire library (including the Base64 Methods) are available on GitHub.

Or alternatively, if you want the code to just the Base64 methods themselves, I've posted it here:

First, you need the mapping tables:

static const char _base64EncodingTable[64] = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/";
static const short _base64DecodingTable[256] = {
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -1, -1, -2, -1, -1, -2, -2,
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -1, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, 62, -2, -2, -2, 63,
    52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2,  0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14,
    15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40,
    41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2,
    -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2, -2
};

To Encode:

+ (NSString *)encodeBase64WithString:(NSString *)strData {
    return [QSStrings encodeBase64WithData:[strData dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]];
}

+ (NSString *)encodeBase64WithData:(NSData *)objData {
    const unsigned char * objRawData = [objData bytes];
    char * objPointer;
    char * strResult;

    // Get the Raw Data length and ensure we actually have data
    int intLength = [objData length];
    if (intLength == 0) return nil;

    // Setup the String-based Result placeholder and pointer within that placeholder
    strResult = (char *)calloc((((intLength + 2) / 3) * 4) + 1, sizeof(char));
    objPointer = strResult;

    // Iterate through everything
    while (intLength > 2) { // keep going until we have less than 24 bits
        *objPointer++ = _base64EncodingTable[objRawData[0] >> 2];
        *objPointer++ = _base64EncodingTable[((objRawData[0] & 0x03) << 4) + (objRawData[1] >> 4)];
        *objPointer++ = _base64EncodingTable[((objRawData[1] & 0x0f) << 2) + (objRawData[2] >> 6)];
        *objPointer++ = _base64EncodingTable[objRawData[2] & 0x3f];

        // we just handled 3 octets (24 bits) of data
        objRawData += 3;
        intLength -= 3; 
    }

    // now deal with the tail end of things
    if (intLength != 0) {
        *objPointer++ = _base64EncodingTable[objRawData[0] >> 2];
        if (intLength > 1) {
            *objPointer++ = _base64EncodingTable[((objRawData[0] & 0x03) << 4) + (objRawData[1] >> 4)];
            *objPointer++ = _base64EncodingTable[(objRawData[1] & 0x0f) << 2];
            *objPointer++ = '=';
        } else {
            *objPointer++ = _base64EncodingTable[(objRawData[0] & 0x03) << 4];
            *objPointer++ = '=';
            *objPointer++ = '=';
        }
    }

    // Terminate the string-based result
    *objPointer = '\0';

    // Create result NSString object
    NSString *base64String = [NSString stringWithCString:strResult encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];

    // Free memory
    free(strResult);

    return base64String;
}

To Decode:

+ (NSData *)decodeBase64WithString:(NSString *)strBase64 {
    const char *objPointer = [strBase64 cStringUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
    size_t intLength = strlen(objPointer);
    int intCurrent;
    int i = 0, j = 0, k;

    unsigned char *objResult = calloc(intLength, sizeof(unsigned char));

    // Run through the whole string, converting as we go
    while ( ((intCurrent = *objPointer++) != '\0') && (intLength-- > 0) ) {
        if (intCurrent == '=') {
            if (*objPointer != '=' && ((i % 4) == 1)) {// || (intLength > 0)) {
                // the padding character is invalid at this point -- so this entire string is invalid
                free(objResult);
                return nil;
            }
            continue;
        }

        intCurrent = _base64DecodingTable[intCurrent];
        if (intCurrent == -1) {
            // we're at a whitespace -- simply skip over
            continue;
        } else if (intCurrent == -2) {
            // we're at an invalid character
            free(objResult);
            return nil;
        }

        switch (i % 4) {
            case 0:
                objResult[j] = intCurrent << 2;
                break;

            case 1:
                objResult[j++] |= intCurrent >> 4;
                objResult[j] = (intCurrent & 0x0f) << 4;
                break;

            case 2:
                objResult[j++] |= intCurrent >>2;
                objResult[j] = (intCurrent & 0x03) << 6;
                break;

            case 3:
                objResult[j++] |= intCurrent;
                break;
        }
        i++;
    }

    // mop things up if we ended on a boundary
    k = j;
    if (intCurrent == '=') {
        switch (i % 4) {
            case 1:
                // Invalid state
                free(objResult);
                return nil;

            case 2:
                k++;
                // flow through
            case 3:
                objResult[k] = 0;
        }
    }

    // Cleanup and setup the return NSData
    NSData * objData = [[[NSData alloc] initWithBytes:objResult length:j] autorelease];
    free(objResult);
    return objData;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Finally a correct and efficient implementation. Thanks. Some of the other code around here scares me. –  Mike Weller Nov 8 '11 at 7:53
3  
The memory allocated as strResult in the encoder seems to be leaked; it just needs a free() at the end (before returning but after NSString stringWithCString) –  JosephH Nov 25 '11 at 14:20
2  
In your encodeBase64WithData: method, doesn't the first parameter in the call to calloc() need to be incremented by 1 to account for the null terminator ('\0') you add at the end? –  erikprice Jan 30 '12 at 23:00
1  
The fact that apple doesn't provide this makes God want to murder kittens... a lot of them... –  dsingleton May 18 '12 at 16:50
2  
I've been using this for a while and it seemed to work great until I started getting some memory corruption related errors and using guard malloc I narrowed it down to this line: *objPointer = '\0'; so beware if you use this in your own apps. –  Mattia Jul 20 '12 at 18:55

iOS includes built in support for base64 encoding and decoding. If you look at resolv.h you should see the two functions b64_ntop and b64_pton . The Square SocketRocket library provides a reasonable example of how to use these functions from objective-c.

These functions are pretty well tested and reliable - unlike many of the implementations you may find in random internet postings. Don't forget to link against libresolv.dylib.

share|improve this answer
3  
Awesome; so much better than random internet site! In case anyone is worried about using these scantly-documented functions, you can see the source for these on Apple's site. –  Jesse Rusak Apr 19 '13 at 21:56
3  
Why isn't this the accepted answer? –  cbh2000 Aug 28 '13 at 18:28
1  
This guy gives some more background on it: blog.montgomerie.net/ios-hidden-base64-routines –  MikeMurray Feb 5 at 1:24

Historically we would have directed you to one of the many third-party base 64 libraries (as discussed in the other answers) for converting from binary data to base 64 string (and back), but iOS 7 now has native base 64 encoding (and exposes the previously private iOS 4 methods, in case you need to support earlier versions of iOS).

Thus to convert NSData to NSString base 64 representation you can use base64EncodedStringWithOptions. If you have to support iOS versions prior to 7.0 as well, you can do:

NSString *string;

if ([data respondsToSelector:@selector(base64EncodedStringWithOptions:)]) {
    string = [data base64EncodedStringWithOptions:kNilOptions];  // iOS 7+
} else {
    string = [data base64Encoding];                              // pre iOS7
}

And to convert base 64 NSString back to NSData you can use initWithBase64EncodedString. Likewise, if you need to support iOS versions prior to 7.0, you can do:

NSData *data;

if ([NSData instancesRespondToSelector:@selector(initWithBase64EncodedString:options:)]) {
    data = [[NSData alloc] initWithBase64EncodedString:string options:kNilOptions];  // iOS 7+
} else {
    data = [[NSData alloc] initWithBase64Encoding:string];                           // pre iOS7
}

Obviously, if you don't need backward compatibility with iOS versions prior to 7.0, it's even easier, just use base64EncodedStringWithOptions or initWithBase64EncodedString, respectively, and don't bother with the run-time check for earlier iOS versions. In fact, if you use the above code when your minimum target is iOS 7 or greater, you'll actually get a compiler warning about the deprecated methods. So, in iOS 7 and greater, you would simply convert to base 64 string with:

NSString *string = [data base64EncodedStringWithOptions:kNilOptions];

and back again with:

NSData *data = [[NSData alloc] initWithBase64EncodedString:string options:kNilOptions]; 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks about that Rob. Could you please briefly elaborate on what you wrote, "...and exposes the previously private iOS 4 methods"? –  Irene Jan 28 at 8:21
2  
@Irene The base64Encoding method has actually been there since iOS 4 (now deprecated in iOS 7.0, replaced by base64EncodedStringWithOptions), but it was a private method (i.e. a method that Apple may have used internally, but never released it to the public). In the past, because it wasn't included in the .h header files, you would have received a compiler warning if you tried to use it (even though it would have worked). Apple has now decided to make that previously private method public, giving us more backward compatibility in our use of native base 64 methods. –  Rob Jan 28 at 13:35
    
Perfect, thank you very much for the explanation –  Irene Jan 28 at 14:20
2  
It's a shame this answer is buried beneath all those custom implementations. It's a weakness of SO, where a more appropriate solution may have come about long after the original question was asked, that solution now has to compete with what was previously accepted. –  jakev Mar 15 at 1:22

Since this seems to be the number one google hit on base64 encoding and iphone, I felt like sharing my experience with the code snippet above.

It works, but it is extremely slow. A benchmark on a random image (0.4 mb) took 37 seconds on native iphone. The main reason is probably all the OOP magic - single char NSStrings etc, which are only autoreleased after the encoding is done.

Another suggestion posted here (ab)uses the openssl library, which feels like overkill as well.

The code below takes 70 ms - that's a 500 times speedup. This only does base64 encoding (decoding will follow as soon as I encounter it)

+ (NSString *) base64StringFromData: (NSData *)data length: (int)length {
int lentext = [data length]; 
if (lentext < 1) return @"";

char *outbuf = malloc(lentext*4/3+4); // add 4 to be sure

if ( !outbuf ) return nil;

const unsigned char *raw = [data bytes];

int inp = 0;
int outp = 0;
int do_now = lentext - (lentext%3);

for ( outp = 0, inp = 0; inp < do_now; inp += 3 )
{
    outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[(raw[inp] & 0xFC) >> 2];
    outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[((raw[inp] & 0x03) << 4) | ((raw[inp+1] & 0xF0) >> 4)];
    outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[((raw[inp+1] & 0x0F) << 2) | ((raw[inp+2] & 0xC0) >> 6)];
    outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[raw[inp+2] & 0x3F];
}

if ( do_now < lentext )
{
    char tmpbuf[2] = {0,0};
    int left = lentext%3;
    for ( int i=0; i < left; i++ )
    {
        tmpbuf[i] = raw[do_now+i];
    }
    raw = tmpbuf;
    outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[(raw[inp] & 0xFC) >> 2];
    outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[((raw[inp] & 0x03) << 4) | ((raw[inp+1] & 0xF0) >> 4)];
    if ( left == 2 ) outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[((raw[inp+1] & 0x0F) << 2) | ((raw[inp+2] & 0xC0) >> 6)];
}

NSString *ret = [[[NSString alloc] initWithBytes:outbuf length:outp encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding] autorelease];
free(outbuf);

return ret;
}

I left out the line-cutting since I didn't need it, but it's trivial to add.

For those who are interested in optimizing: the goal is to minimize what happens in the main loop. Therefore all logic to deal with the last 3 bytes is treated outside the loop.

Also, try to work on data in-place, without additional copying to/from buffers. And reduce any arithmetic to the bare minimum.

Observe that the bits that are put together to look up an entry in the table, would not overlap when they were to be orred together without shifting. A major improvement could therefore be to use 4 separate 256 byte lookup tables and eliminate the shifts, like this:

outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable1[(raw[inp] & 0xFC)];
outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable2[(raw[inp] & 0x03) | (raw[inp+1] & 0xF0)];
outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable3[(raw[inp+1] & 0x0F) | (raw[inp+2] & 0xC0)];
outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable4[raw[inp+2] & 0x3F];

Of course you could take it a whole lot further, but that's beyond the scope here.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Really nice answer. –  Alex Reynolds May 7 '10 at 19:05
    
Hmm. I couldn't get this to work. I observe a different base64 encoding than my expected value. Have you tested this with the examples in RFC 4648? tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4648 –  Alex Reynolds May 7 '10 at 19:21
3  
Struggling to see what base64EncodingTable1, base64EncodingTable2, base64EncodingTable3 and base64EncodingTable4 are referencing? –  Jamie Chapman Jul 31 '10 at 13:34
    
Very helpful, but it can read beyond the end of the input buffer. When (left==2), raw[inp+2] will be one byte beyond the end of tmpbuf. I think the line should be: if ( left == 2 ) outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[((raw[inp+1] & 0x0F) << 2)]; –  John Lemberger Nov 15 '10 at 17:16
    
change the following line <code> char tmpbuf[2] = {0,0};</code> to <code>unsigned char tmpbuf[3] = {0,0,0};</code> –  Satya Apr 11 '11 at 11:38

In mvds's excellent improvement, there are two problems. Change code to this:

raw = tmpbuf;
inp = 0;
outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[(raw[inp] & 0xFC) >> 2];
outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[((raw[inp] & 0x03) << 4) | ((raw[inp+1] & 0xF0) >> 4)];
if ( left == 2 ) outbuf[outp++] = base64EncodingTable[((raw[inp+1] & 0x0F) << 2) | ((raw[inp+2] & 0xC0) >> 6)];
else outbuf[outp++] = '=';
outbuf[outp++] = '=';
share|improve this answer

Better solution :

There is a built in function in NSData

[data base64Encoding]; //iOS < 7.0
[data base64EncodedStringWithOptions:NSDataBase64Encoding76CharacterLineLength]; //iOS >= 7.0
share|improve this answer
    
According to the documentation: "Although this method was only introduced publicly for iOS 7, it has existed since iOS 4; you can use it if your application needs to target an operating system prior to iOS 7". This existed but was private prior to 7. You should be careful using it if your application is not linked against the 7 SDK. –  quellish Oct 24 '13 at 7:15
    
We can do that based on the iOS version on which the app is running using "[[UIDevice currentDevice] systemVersion].floatValue". –  Nagaraj Oct 24 '13 at 12:20
2  
1. That would not tell you what SDK you linked against, that is a runtime check. 2. That is directly counter to Apple's guidance. You should be checking for the availability of a feature, not the system version. –  quellish Oct 24 '13 at 19:28

Glad people liked it. The end-game was a little flawed I must admit. Besides rightly setting inp=0 you should either also increase tmpbuf's size to 3, like

unsigned char tmpbuf[3] = {0,0,0};

or leave out the orring of raw[inp+2]; if we would have a raw[inp+2] != 0 for this chunk we would still be in the loop of course...

Either way works, you might consider keeping the final table lookup block identical to the one in the loop for clarity. In the final version I used I did

while ( outp%4 ) outbuf[outp++] = '=';

To add the ==

Sorry I didn't check RFC's and stuff, should have done a better job!

share|improve this answer
3  
you already have an account here, as your previous answer is actually a different account. Also, this should be either an edit to that or a comment. –  Alastair Pitts Jul 6 '10 at 0:16
    
@alastair, you seem to get an "account" every time you post an answer without registering, after cleaning cookies. I wasn't able to connect to my first "account" (even with the same email and ip address) so I just put it there as a new answer, sorry for that. -- just registered! –  mvds Jul 8 '10 at 21:07
3  
Any chance you could edit this answer into your previous one so there's a definitive correct version? Thanks! –  JosephH Oct 20 '11 at 12:28
#import "NSDataAdditions.h"
@implementation NSData (NSDataAdditions)

+ (NSData *) base64DataFromString: (NSString *)string {
  unsigned long ixtext, lentext;
  unsigned char ch, input[4], output[3];
  short i, ixinput;
  Boolean flignore, flendtext = false;
  const char *temporary;
  NSMutableData *result;

  if (!string)
    return [NSData data];

  ixtext = 0;
  temporary = [string UTF8String];
  lentext = [string length];
  result = [NSMutableData dataWithCapacity: lentext];
  ixinput = 0;

  while (true) {
    if (ixtext >= lentext)
      break;
    ch = temporary[ixtext++];
    flignore = false;

    if ((ch >= 'A') && (ch <= 'Z'))
      ch = ch - 'A';
    else if ((ch >= 'a') && (ch <= 'z'))
      ch = ch - 'a' + 26;
    else if ((ch >= '0') && (ch <= '9'))
      ch = ch - '0' + 52;
    else if (ch == '+')
      ch = 62;
    else if (ch == '=')
      flendtext = true;
    else if (ch == '/')
      ch = 63;
    else
      flignore = true;

    if (!flignore) {
      short ctcharsinput = 3;
      Boolean flbreak = false;

      if (flendtext) {
         if (ixinput == 0)
           break;              
         if ((ixinput == 1) || (ixinput == 2))
           ctcharsinput = 1;
         else
           ctcharsinput = 2;
         ixinput = 3;
         flbreak = true;
      }

      input[ixinput++] = ch;

      if (ixinput == 4){
        ixinput = 0;
        output[0] = (input[0] << 2) | ((input[1] & 0x30) >> 4);
        output[1] = ((input[1] & 0x0F) << 4) | ((input[2] & 0x3C) >> 2);
        output[2] = ((input[2] & 0x03) << 6) | (input[3] & 0x3F);
        for (i = 0; i < ctcharsinput; i++)
        [result appendBytes: &output[i] length: 1];
      }
    if (flbreak)
      break;
    }
  }
  return result;
}
@end
share|improve this answer

Here's a compact Objective-C version as a Category on NSData. It takes some thinking about...

@implementation NSData (DataUtils)

static char base64[] = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/";

- (NSString *)newStringInBase64FromData
{
 NSMutableString *dest = [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithString:@""];
 unsigned char * working = (unsigned char *)[self bytes];
 int srcLen = [self length];

 // tackle the source in 3's as conveniently 4 Base64 nibbles fit into 3 bytes
 for (int i=0; i<srcLen; i += 3)
 {
  // for each output nibble
  for (int nib=0; nib<4; nib++)
  {
   // nibble:nib from char:byt
   int byt = (nib == 0)?0:nib-1;
   int ix = (nib+1)*2;

   if (i+byt >= srcLen) break;

   // extract the top bits of the nibble, if valid
   unsigned char curr = ((working[i+byt] << (8-ix)) & 0x3F);

   // extract the bottom bits of the nibble, if valid
   if (i+nib < srcLen) curr |= ((working[i+nib] >> ix) & 0x3F);

   [dest appendFormat:@"%c", base64[curr]];
  }
 }

 return dest;
}

@end

Padding can be added if required by making the scope of 'byt' wider and appending 'dest' with (2-byt) "=" characters before returning.

A Category can then be added to NSString, thus:

@implementation NSString (StringUtils)

- (NSString *)newStringInBase64FromString
{
 NSData *theData = [NSData dataWithBytes:[self UTF8String] length:[self length]]; 

 return [theData newStringInBase64FromData];
}

@end
share|improve this answer

For an update to use the NSData (NSDataBase64Encoding) category methods in iOS7 see my answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/18927627/1602729

share|improve this answer

iOS has had built-in Base64 encoding and decoding methods (without using libresolv) since iOS 4. However, it was only declared in the iOS 7 SDK. Apple documentation states that you can use it when targeting iOS 4 and above.

NSData *myData = ... some data
NSString *base64String = [myData base64Encoding];
NSData *decodedData = [[NSData alloc] initWithBase64Encoding:base64String];
share|improve this answer

Here is an example to convert an NSData object to Base 64. It also shows how to go the other way (decode a base 64 encoded NSData object):

NSData *dataTake2 = 
  [@"iOS Developer Tips" dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];

// Convert to Base64 data
NSData *base64Data = [dataTake2 base64EncodedDataWithOptions:0];

// Do something with the data...

// Now convert back from Base64
NSData *nsdataDecoded = [base64Data initWithBase64EncodedData:base64Data options:0];
share|improve this answer

I Think This will be helpful

 + (NSString *)toBase64String:(NSString *)string {
    NSData *data = [string dataUsingEncoding: NSUnicodeStringEncoding];

    NSString *ret = [NSStringUtil base64StringFromData:data length:[data length]];

    return ret;
    }

    + (NSString *)fromBase64String:(NSString *)string {
    NSData  *base64Data = [NSStringUtil base64DataFromString:string];

    NSString* decryptedStr = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:base64Data encoding:NSUnicodeStringEncoding];

    return [decryptedStr autorelease];
    }
share|improve this answer

in iOS 7

        NSData *data=[[NSData alloc]init];
        [data base64Encoding];
share|improve this answer
    
Nagaraj already mentioned this. See his post and the comments that accompnay it that state its been there since iOS 4. –  jww Feb 6 at 8:27

This is best solution of your question please try it.

https://github.com/ekscrypto/Base64

Hope , it will work for you

share|improve this answer

I have done it using the following class..

@implementation Base64Converter
static char base64EncodingTable[64] = {
'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L',  'M', 'N', 'O', 'P',
'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T', 'U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Y', 'Z', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f',
'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v',
'w', 'x', 'y', 'z', '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7',    '8', '9', '+', '/'
};
+ (NSString *) base64StringFromData: (NSData *)data length: (int)length {

unsigned long ixtext, lentext;

long ctremaining;

unsigned char input[3], output[4];

short i, charsonline = 0, ctcopy;

const unsigned char *raw;

NSMutableString *result;

lentext = [data length];

if (lentext < 1)
    return @"";

result = [NSMutableString stringWithCapacity: lentext];

raw = [data bytes];

ixtext = 0;

while (true) {

    ctremaining = lentext - ixtext;

    if (ctremaining <= 0)
        break;

    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        unsigned long ix = ixtext + i;
        if (ix < lentext)
            input[i] = raw[ix];
        else
            input[i] = 0;
    }

    output[0] = (input[0] & 0xFC) >> 2;

    output[1] = ((input[0] & 0x03) << 4) | ((input[1] & 0xF0) >> 4);

    output[2] = ((input[1] & 0x0F) << 2) | ((input[2] & 0xC0) >> 6);

    output[3] = input[2] & 0x3F;

    ctcopy = 4;

    switch (ctremaining) {
        case 1:
            ctcopy = 2;
            break;

        case 2:
            ctcopy = 3;
            break;
    }

    for (i = 0; i < ctcopy; i++)
        [result appendString: [NSString stringWithFormat: @"%c", base64EncodingTable[output[i]]]];

    for (i = ctcopy; i < 4; i++)
        [result appendString: @"="];

    ixtext += 3;

    charsonline += 4;

    if ((length > 0) && (charsonline >= length))
        charsonline = 0;
}
return result;
}
@end

While calling call

 [Base64Converter base64StringFromData:dataval length:23434];

That's it...

share|improve this answer

Download Base64

Do following code to convert an image to base64

NSString *base64String=[UIImagePNGRepresentation(image) base64Encoding];
share|improve this answer

protected by Brad Larson Apr 12 '11 at 18:22

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