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Why does the comparison of value to null return false, except when using a NOT IN, where it returns true?


Given a query to find all stackoverflow users who have a post:

SELECT * FROM Users
WHERE UserID IN (SELECT UserID FROM Posts)

This works as expected; i get a list of all users who have a post.

Now query for the inverse; find all stackoverflow users who don't have a post:

SELECT * FROM Users
WHERE UserID NOT IN (SELECT UserID FROM Posts)

This returns no records, which is incorrect.

Given hypothetical data1

Users              Posts
================   ===============================
UserID  Username   PostID   UserID  Subject
------  --------   -------  ------  ----------------
1       atkins     1        1       Welcome to stack ov...
2       joels      2        2       Welcome all!
...     ...        ...      ...
399573  gt6989b    ...      ...
...     ...        ...      ...
                   10592    null    (deleted by nsl&fbi...
                   ...      ... 

And assume the rules of NULLs:

  • NULL = NULL evaluates to unknown
  • NULL <> NULL evaluates to unknown
  • value = NULL evaluates unknown

If we look at the 2nd query, we're interested in finding all rows where the Users.UserID is not found in the Posts.UserID column. i would proceed logically as follows:

Check UserID 1

  • 1 = 1 returns true. So we conclude that this user has some posts, and do not include them in the output list

Now check UserID 2:

  • 2 = 1 returns false, so we keep looking
  • 2 = 2 returns true, so we conclude that this user has some posts, and do not include them in the output list

Now check UserID 399573

  • 399573 = 1 returns false, so we keep looking
  • 399573 = 2 returns false, so we keep looking
  • ...
  • 399573 = null returns unknown, so we keep looking
  • ...

We found no posts by UserID 399573, so we would include him in the output list.

Except SQL Server doesn't do this. If you have a NULL in your in list, then suddenly it finds a match. It suddenly finds a match. Suddenly 399573 = null evaluates to true.

Why does the comparison of value to null return unknown, except when it returns true?

Edit: i know that i can workaround this nonsensical behavior by specifically excluding the nulls:

SELECT * FROM Users
WHERE UserID NOT IN (
   SELECT UserID FROM Posts
   WHERE UserID IS NOT NULL)

But i shouldn't have to, as far as i can tell the boolean logic should be fine without it - hence my question.

Footnotes

  • 1 hypothetical data; if you don't like it: make up your down.
  • celko now has his own tag
share|improve this question
3  
Duplicate: See stackoverflow.com/questions/129077/… –  Keith Oct 13 '10 at 14:30
1  
@Ian Boyd = I don't think that's a bug. Something else to remember is IN uses or and NOT IN uses AND. When you are evaluating against a NULL with an inequality vs. a known value, you will always get a false since there is no way to know if it matches or not. –  JNK Oct 13 '10 at 14:49
2  
@Ian Boyd: I wouldn't call this a bug. IN is nothing more than a convenient shorthand for a series of OR clauses. Technically, the correct way to think of the expansion given in the other question is: select 'true' where NOT(3 = 1 or 3 = 2 or 3 = null), which is logically equivalent by DeMorgan's Law. In any case, the fallacy is assuming that a comparison of a value=NULL returns FALSE when in fact the result is UNKNOWN. –  Joe Stefanelli Oct 13 '10 at 14:52
5  
Yep. Not a bug. Also it is not boolean logic. It is 3 valued logic. –  Martin Smith Oct 13 '10 at 15:17
2  
@Ian Boyd - For your sister's name issue, that's a data modelling issue. You should have a subtable SISTER that refers back to your main table. If you don't have a sister you wouldn't be included in the result set. Also, NULL means unknown. If you have 2 people whose names you don't know, can you say one of their names isn't Kirsten? –  JNK Oct 16 '10 at 18:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Common problem, canned answer:

The behavior of NOT IN clause may be confusing and as such it needs some explanations. Consider the following query:

SELECT LastName, FirstName FROM Person.Contact WHERE LastName NOT IN('Hedlund', 'Holloway', NULL)

Although there are more than a thousand distinct last names in AdventureWorks.Person.Contact, the query returns nothing. This may look counterintuitive to a beginner database programmer, but it actually makes perfect sense. The explanation consist of several simple steps. First of all, consider the following two queries, which are clearly equivalent:

SELECT LastName, FirstName FROM Person.Contact

WHERE LastName IN('Hedlund', 'Holloway', NULL)



SELECT LastName, FirstName FROM Person.Contact

WHERE LastName='Hedlund' OR LastName='Holloway' OR LastName=NULL

Note that both queries return expected results. Now, let us recall DeMorgan's theorem, which states that:

not (P and Q) = (not P) or (not Q)

not (P or Q) = (not P) and (not Q)

I am cutting and pasting from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Morgan_duality). Applying DeMorgan's theorem to this queries, it follows that these two queries are also equivalent:

SELECT LastName, FirstName FROM Person.Contact WHERE LastName NOT IN('Hedlund', 'Holloway', NULL)



SELECT LastName, FirstName FROM Person.Contact

WHERE LastName<>'Hedlund' AND LastName<>'Holloway' AND LastName<>NULL

This last LastName<>NULL can never be true

share|improve this answer
    
DeMorgan's theorem applies to boolean logic, not to 3-valued logic. For example: not (unknown or true) = false, but (not unknown) and (not true) = unknown, violating the theorem –  Andomar Oct 13 '10 at 16:12
    
My confusion comes from the second "equivalent" set of queries. i would argue that they're not equivalent - since they return different answers. But my argument is irrelevant, since the ANSI guys defined the first is an alias of the 2nd. –  Ian Boyd Oct 16 '10 at 15:19
    
Accepted this answer, as it points out NOT IN is defined to be an alias for (x<>a) AND (x<>b) AND (x<>c) .... –  Ian Boyd Oct 16 '10 at 15:26
1  
@Andomar - Actually, I believe it goes: (not unknown) and (not true) = unknown and false = false, which is the same result as: not (unknown or true) = not (true) = false. Similarly, not (unknown or false) = not (unknown) = unknown, which is the same result as: not (unknown and true) = not (unknown) = unknown. So the theorem holds for 3-valued logic, provided the axioms: unknown or true = true; unknown and false = false; –  Rob Parker Apr 20 '11 at 19:05

The assumption in your first sentence isn't right:

Why does the comparison of value to null return false, except when using a NOT IN, where it returns true?

But comparison of a value to null does not return false; it returns unknown. And unknown has its own logic:

unknown  AND  true   = unknown
unknown  OR   true   = true
unknown  OR   false  = unknown

One example of how this works out:

where 1 not in (2, null)
--> where 1 <> 2 and 1 <> null
--> where true and unknown
--> where unknown

The where clause only matches on true, so this filters out any row.

You can find the full glory of 3 value logic at Wikipedia.

share|improve this answer
    
i changed all references involving AND null to evaluate to unknown. Question still stands. –  Ian Boyd Oct 16 '10 at 15:17

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