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In x86 assembly, the overflow flag is set when an add or sub operation on a signed integer overflows, and the carry flag is set when an operation on an unsigned integer overflows.

However, when it comes to the inc and dec instructions, the situation seems to be somewhat different. According to this website, the inc instruction does not affect the carry flag at all.

But I can't find any information about how inc and dec affect the overflow flag, if at all.

Do inc or dec set the overflow flag when an integer overflow occurs? And is this behavior the same for both signed and unsigned integers?

============================= EDIT =============================

Okay, so essentially the consensus here is that INC and DEC should behave the same as ADD and SUB, in terms of setting flags, with the exception of the carry flag. This is also what it says in the Intel manual.

The problem is I can't actually reproduce this behavior in practice, when it comes to unsigned integers.

Consider the following assembly code (using GCC inline assembly to make it easier to print out results.)

int8_t ovf = 0;

__asm__
(
    "movb $-128, %%bh;"
    "decb %%bh;"
    "seto %b0;"
    : "=g"(ovf)
    :
    : "%bh"
);

printf("Overflow flag: %d\n", ovf);

Here we decrement a signed 8-bit value of -128. Since -128 is the smallest possible value, an overflow is inevitable. As expected, this prints out: Overflow flag: 1

But when we do the same with an unsigned value, the behavior isn't as I expect:

int8_t ovf = 0;

__asm__
(
    "movb $255, %%bh;"
    "incb %%bh;"
    "seto %b0;"
    : "=g"(ovf)
    :
    : "%bh"
);

printf("Overflow flag: %d\n", ovf);

Here I increment an unsigned 8-bit value of 255. Since 255 is the largest possible value, an overflow is inevitable. However, this prints out: Overflow flag: 0.

Huh? Why didn't it set the overflow flag in this case?

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7 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The overflow flag is set when an operation would cause a sign change. Your code is very close. I was able to set the OF flag with the following (VC++) code:

char ovf = 0;

_asm {
    mov bh, 127
    inc bh
    seto ovf
}
cout << "ovf: " << int(ovf) << endl;

When BH is incremented the MSB changes from a 0 to a 1, causing the OF to be set.

This also sets the OF:

char ovf = 0;

_asm {
    mov bh, 128
    dec bh
    seto ovf
}
cout << "ovf: " << int(ovf) << endl;

Keep in mind that the processor does not distinguish between signed and unsigned numbers. When you use 2's complement arithmetic, you can have one set of instructions that handle both. If you want to test for unsigned overflow, you need to use the carry flag. Since INC/DEC don't affect the carry flag, you need to use ADD/SUB for that case.

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Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer's Manuals

Look at the appropriate manual Instruction Set Reference, A-M. Every instruction is precisely documented.

Here is the INC section on affected flags:

The CF flag is not affected. The OF, SZ, ZF, AZ, and PF flags are set according to the result.

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Yes, that was my understanding as well. However, in practice this doesn't seem to actually happen. See my edited question for assembly code demonstrating this. –  Channel72 Oct 13 '10 at 16:33
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try changing your test to pass in the number rather than hard code it, then have a loop that tries all 256 numbers to find the one if any that affects the flag. Or have the asm perform the loop and exit out when it hits the flag and or when it wraps around to the number it started with (start with something other than 0x00, 0x7f, 0x80, or 0xFF).

EDIT

.globl inc
inc:
    mov $33, %eax

top:
    inc %al
    jo done
    jmp top

done:
    ret

.globl dec
dec:
    mov $33, %eax

topx:
    dec %al
    jo donex
    jmp topx

donex:
    ret

Inc overflows when it goes from 0x7F to 0x80. dec overflows when it goes from 0x80 to 0x7F, I suspect the problem is in the way you are using inline assembler.

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signed and unsigned integers are normally a manifestation of programming languages and not reflected in hardware. There isnt a signed inc and unsigned inc, it is just inc one type, universal. That is why OF exists for this instruction. Some processors are not normally that nice and dont provide a way to detect unsigned vs signed results. I was surprised to see this feature actually. –  dwelch Oct 13 '10 at 17:41
    
Well, there is mul versus imul and div versus idiv with the x86 instruction set –  Channel72 Oct 13 '10 at 18:04
    
good...normally add and subtract, inc, dec, etc are not sign based because it doesnt make sense. –  dwelch Oct 13 '10 at 20:31
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As many of the other answers have pointed out, INC and DEC do not affect the CF, whereas ADD and SUB do.

What has not been said yet, however, is that this might make a performance difference. Not that you'd usually be bothered by that unless you are trying to optimise the hell out of a routine, but essentially not setting the CF means that INC/DEC only write to part of the flags register, which can cause a partial flag register stall, see Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Optimization Reference Manual or Agner Fog's optimisation manuals.

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Except for the carry flag inc sets the flags the same way as add operand 1 would.

The fact that inc does not affect the carry flag is very important.

http://oopweb.com/Assembly/Documents/ArtOfAssembly/Volume/Chapter_6/CH06-2.html#HEADING2-117

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Except add also sets the overflow flag if an integer overflow occurs, but as far as I can see, inc does not do the same. See my edited question for assembly code demonstrating this. –  Channel72 Oct 13 '10 at 16:34
3  
@Channel72 you understand flags incorrectly. CF means carry out of MSB (most significant byte) like 1111 1111 + 1 = 1 | 0000 0000 CF here. CF means invalid (overflow) unsigned operation. (because it is 256, which can't fit into byte). But it is pretty valid signed operation (-1 + 1 = 0). OF is when carry is to MSB, like 0111 1111 + 1 = 1000 0000 this means valid unsigned and invalid signed op (127 + 8 = -128 oops, this is overflow in case of signed, because range is -128; 127) –  Andrey Oct 13 '10 at 17:22
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What the processor does is set the appropriate flags for the results of these instructions (add, adc, dec, inc, sbb, sub) for both the signed and unsigned cases i e two different flag results for every op. The alternative would be having two sets of instructions where one sets signed-related flags and the other the unsigned-related. If the issuing compiler is using unsigned variables in the operation it will test carry and zero (jc, jnc, jb, jbe etc), if signed it tests overflow, sign and zero (jo, jno, jg, jng, jl, jle etc).

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The CPU/ALU is only capable of handling unsigned binary numbers, and then it uses OF, CF, AF, SF, ZF, etc., to allow you to decide whether to use it as a signed number (OF), an unsigned number (CF) or a BCD number (AF).



About your problem, remember to consider the binary numbers themselves, as unsigned.

Also, the overflow and the OF require 3 numbers: The input number, a second number to use in the arithmetic, and the result number.

Overflow is activated only if the first and second numbers have the same value for the sign bit (the most significant bit) and the result has a different sign. As in, adding 2 negative numbers resulted in a positive number, or adding 2 positive numbers resulted in a negative number:

if( (Sign_Num1==Sign_Num2) && (Sign_Result!=Sign_Num1) ) OF=1;
else OF=0;


For your first problem, you are using -128 as the first number. The second number is implicitly -1, used by the DEC instruction. So we really have the binary numbers 0x80 and 0xFF. Both them have the sign bit set to 1. The result is 0x7F, which is a number with the sign bit set to 0. We got 2 initial numbers with the same sign, and a result with a different sign, so we indicate an overflow. -128-1 resulted in 127, and thus the overflow flag is set to indicate a wrong signed result.





For your second problem, you are using 255 as the first number. The second number is implicitly 1, used by the INC instruction. So we really have the binary numbers 0xFF and 0x01. Both them have a different sign bit, so it is not possible to get an overflow (it is only possible to overflow when basically adding 2 numbers of the same sign, but it is never possible to overflow with 2 numbers of a different sign because they will never lead to go beyond the possible signed value). The result is 0x00, and it doesn't set the overflow flag because 255+1, or more exactly, -1+1 gives 0, which is obviously correct for signed arithmetic.

Remember that for the overflow flag to be set, the 2 numbers being added/subtracted need to have the sign bit with the same value, and then the result must have a sign bit with a value different from them.

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