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Consider the next code:

#container {
    width:500px;
}

#inside {
   padding:10px;
   width:100%;
}

If I choose width:100%; will it be the same as stating "width 480:px" (that is, calculating the padding already) or will it be as "width:500px"

Thanks

Joel

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It will be like width:500px and adding the padding it will push the insides of overflow the #container..

But if #inside is a block element, then just giving the padding will make it behave as if it were width:480px

Example at http://www.jsfiddle.net/uA9LV/

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1  
Not exactly. It won't push the insides of the #container at all. Instead, #inside will end up outside of the container. –  Chris Lively Oct 13 '10 at 18:22
    
@Chris, indeed ... it was a figure of speech, but not appropriate in this case.. edited :) –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Oct 13 '10 at 18:23
    
BTW, I'm digging jsfiddle.net. Looks like a really nice way to present code. –  Chris Lively Oct 13 '10 at 18:24
    
So what is the rule? I thought leaving the width property blank results in "width:100%". –  Joel Oct 13 '10 at 18:25
1  
@Joel, leaving it blank results to total width being 100%. Inclusive of borders and paddings.. so that is the way to go .. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Oct 13 '10 at 18:27

I put this in a sample document and the container div only resized 3 sides (left, top, and bottom).. and the inside div pushed it's boundaries outside of the container by 20px to the right.

I tested in IE8, Firefox 3.6.10, and the latest Chrome. Using various doctypes had no effect.

The code I used was:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
    <title>Untitled</title>
    <style>
        #container {
            width:500px;
            border: solid 1px blue;
        }

        #inside {
           padding:10px;
           width:100%;
           border: solid 1px red;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="container">
    <div id="inside">
        Hello World!
    </div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Note: if you remove the Width declaration from the #inside div then you'll get exactly what you want. Which is an inner div that is 480px in width + 10px on each side for padding. See this link for more information on it: Solving the CSS Padding problem.

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It will be the same width as the parent container provided it's a block level element. So #inside will be 500px wide with 10px of padding on every side.

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