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            char line[MAXBUF];
            char *result;

            while((result = fgets(line, MAXBUF, fp)) != NULL) {
                printf(result); 
            }

The following code doesn't work fully. Does anyone know how to print result?? MAXBUF is defined to be 1024 and fp is just a file pointer to some file. What im suppose to do in this assignment is read file and print the files output to standard output. Any ideas?

On the line printf(result) i get this error "warning: format not a string literal and no format arguments"

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2  
printf(line); ? –  JoshD Oct 13 '10 at 20:35
    
How does it not work, and what do you expect ? (and incidentally, does the file you read contain any % characters, e.g. %d or.. %s ?) –  nos Oct 13 '10 at 20:35
7  
One should really use printf("%s", result) rather than printf(result), especially if result contains % characters. –  In silico Oct 13 '10 at 20:36
2  
printf("%s\n", line); or printf("%s", line); fflush(stdout); –  John Bode Oct 13 '10 at 20:38
1  
@JoshD, line and result should always the same until result is NULL. Yes, but that's probably not the main problem, unless the test data actually contains conversions (e.g. a percent sign). @Azn, what does "doesn't work fully" mean? What happens? –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 13 '10 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

have a look at the fgets specification, better:

while( fgets(line, MAXBUF, fp)!= NULL) {
                puts(line); 
            }

or

while( fgets(line, MAXBUF, fp) ) {
                puts(line); 
            }
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I don't see what this accomplishes besides adding an extra newline between each line. result may not be necessary, but it's not wrong. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 13 '10 at 20:46

The following is what you want to do:

char line[MAXBUF];
char *result;

while((result = fgets(line, MAXBUF, fp)) != NULL) {
      printf("%s", line);
}

The fgets inputs the line (retaining the newline). You are checking result, which is correct. Theoretically, result should equal line. The printf doesn't have a '\n' because the newline character is retained from the fgets (see the manpage).

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