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The following behaves exactly as I expect it to in Firefox and Safari, but the solution for Internet Explorer eludes me.

The Issue: Non-IE browsers show the container properly pushed away from the sides of the viewport. IE however, maintains a strict 100% height on the container (presumably based on a parent of that container) and instead offsets the container, pushing it off the bottom of the viewport.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<title>The Splits</title>
<head>
<style>
html, body {margin:0;padding:0;height:100%;}

html {
    height:auto;
    min-height:100%;
    overflow:hidden;
    }

div#container {
    position:absolute;
    top:50px;
    right:20px;
    bottom:20px;
    width:290px;
    max-height:100%;
    #height:100%;
    }

div#one,
div#two {
    position:relative;
    height:50%;
    overflow:auto;
    }

div#one {background-color:lightgreen;}
div#two {background-color: lightblue;}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="container">
        <div id="one">top</div>
        <div id="two">bottom</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

An absolutely positioned container holds two 50% height elements.

Requirements are as follows:

  1. The positioning of the container is arbitrary, but it must be pushed away from the sides of the viewport without relying on padding on the viewport.
  2. When the viewport is resized, the height of the two elements within the container must resize based on a percentage value (currently 50% each).
  3. This must work in IE 7+ and Firefox 3+ at a minimum.
  4. If this results in an "OH DUH!" moment for me, you will try not to gloat.

I've tried many combinations of position and height attributes on the HTML and BODY elements, but apparently have not hit upon the right one for IE.

share|improve this question
    
Your code works identically for me in IE 8, FF 3.6 and Chrome v8. I can't speak to earlier versions, though. –  Patches Jan 7 '11 at 21:35
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1 Answer

This uses a little IE specific (nonstandard) code to fix the behavior for IE7. Nothing gets changed for other browsers.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<title>The Splits</title>
<head>
<!-- saved from url=(0014)about:internet -->
<style>
html, body {margin:0;padding:0;height:100%;}

html {
    height:auto;
    min-height:100%;
    overflow:hidden;
    }

div#container {
    position:absolute;
    top:50px;
    right:20px;
    bottom:20px;
    width:290px;
    max-height:100%;
    #height:100%;
    }

div#one,
div#two {
    position:relative;
    height:50%;
    overflow:auto;
    }

div#one {background-color:lightgreen;}
div#two {background-color: lightblue;}
</style>
<!--[if IE 7]>
<style>
div#one,
div#two {
    height:expression(((this.parentElement.offsetHeight-70)/2)+'px');
}
</style>
<![endif]-->
</head>
<body>
    <div id="container">
        <div id="one">top</div>
        <div id="two">bottom</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
This is actually a nice solution to the problem and I'll put it to use. Thank you very much! However, it doesn't treat the parent container (#container) the same way that Firefox does and its background color shows below div#two. While this is a very workable solution, I'd still be curious to know whether or not this is solvable using a generalized CSS solution or if it's a limitation or bug in Internet Explorer? –  Mooseboy Oct 15 '10 at 14:24
    
I'm not sure what you mean by a "generalized" CSS solution. These days I write to standards, then fix for IE6/IE7 inside a conditional comment. It just saves time and effort to do it that way. As to whether it's a "bug", just about everything is. Please "accept" my answer if it helped you. Thanks. –  Gaurav Oct 16 '10 at 1:38
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