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A lot of the times, when I examine code, I like to use intellisense to kind of get a feel for the structure. It's a quick way to know what variables exist and which are in context etc.

However, in Visual Studio 2008, this always results in a check out of TFS. Is it possible to change it so that TFS has to expicitly ask me if I want to check out and if I say no, then I can still edit the file on my workspace.

Or perhaps even better, can TFS automatically detect that a file has got no changes and automatically check in.

I just find that when I check in, I will have all these files which are checked out and half of them have no changes

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"can TFS automatically detect that a file has got no changes and automatically check in." Er... I'd prefer if it automatically did an "undo pending changes" when there are none. I don't want a check-in of a file with no changes. And as far as I know, no. But I've never really tried that - I just do a manual "undo pending changes". – MetalMikester Oct 13 '10 at 23:17
    
you are right. An undo pending change would be better. – Diskdrive Oct 13 '10 at 23:19
    
I forget how TFS operates, but I know that most have a revert-check-out so you can see if it will do that. However, having migrated to a DCVS, I really sort of weep for you. – jcolebrand Oct 13 '10 at 23:23

If you don't save your changes to the code, after you've got "the feeling of the structure", then this may help:

Tools->Options->Source Control->Environment

Change "Editing" drop-down value to "Do nothing". Also, there is a checkbox "Check-in everything when solution or project closing".

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I suggest using F12 (go to definition) instead of intellisense. This way you will see all overloads, their arguments, etc without having to check-out any thing.

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