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Hello i'm trying to create an algorythm that finds out how many ways i can get change back. But i just can't get the implemtation right, i keep getting 4 where i should get 6 and i just can't see why.

This is my implementation in C#, it is create from the pseudocode from http://www.algorithmist.com/index.php/Coin_Change

     private static int[] S = { 1, 2, 5 };
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int amount = 7;
            int ways = count2(amount, S.Length);
            Console.WriteLine("Ways to make change for " + amount + " kr: " + ways.ToString());
            Console.ReadLine();
        }    
static int count2(int n, int m)
        {
        int[,] table = new int[n,m];

        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            for(int j = 0; j < m; j++)
            {
                // Rules
                // 1: table[0,0] or table[0,x] = 1
                // 2: talbe[i <= -1, x] = 0
                // 3: table[x, j <= -1] = 0

                int total = 0;

                // first sub-problem
                // count(n, m-1)
                if (i == 0) // rule 1
                    total += 1;
                else if (i <= -1) // rule 2
                    total += 0;
                else if (j - 1 <= -1)
                    total += 0;
                else
                    total += table[i, j-1];

                // second sub-problem
                // count(n-S[m], m)
                if (j - 1 <= -1) // rule 3
                    total += 0;
                else if (i - S[j - 1] == 0) // rule 1
                    total += 1;
                else if (i - S[j - 1] <= -1) // rule 2
                    total += 0;
                else
                    total += table[i - S[j-1], j];

                table[i, j] = total;
            }
        }
        return table[n-1, m-1];
    }
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Sorry it was ment to be 0..n and 0..m –  DoomStone Oct 14 '10 at 0:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's the algorithm in working order. Press the green "play" arrow to run it. http://www.exorithm.com/algorithm/view/make_change

I think the major problem was the algorithm loops should start at -1. I think it would be much clearer written recursively, but it was a fun exercise.

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Out of sheer late-night boredom (and yes, this would definitely need refining)... It uses recursion, linq and yield all at once and has as many braces as it does lines of code, so I'm quite perversely pleased with it...

    static IEnumerable<List<int>> GetChange(int target, IQueryable<int> coins)
    {
        var availableCoins = from c in coins where c <= target select c;
        if (!availableCoins.Any())
        {
            yield return new List<int>();
        }
        else
        {
            foreach (var thisCoin in availableCoins)
            {
                foreach (var result in GetChange(target - thisCoin, from c in availableCoins where c <= thisCoin select c))
                {
                    result.Add(thisCoin);
                    yield return result;
                }
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This is nice and concise, and you're right, uses all kinds of techniques at once. However, if there is no solution with given coins, it's counting solutions to the closes change smaller. e.g., target 20, coins 3, 6 produces combinations that add to 18. So using this just needs a check that the result adds up to the target. –  goodeye Nov 18 '13 at 2:02
    
Actually, since this is looping all coins up to target, it's a mix of correct and incorrect solutions. e.g., target 18 with 6,5 gives 666, 566, 556, 555. –  goodeye Nov 18 '13 at 16:48

It would be useful if you explained how is your algorithm supposed to work. When there are no comments and variables are named just n, m, i, it is quite difficult to understand the purpose. You should use more descriptive names such as coinType when iterating over various types of coins, for example.

However, there are some places that look quite suspicious to me. For example, your variables i and j iterate over values in range 1 .. m or 1 .. n - they are always going to be positive. This means that your rules 2 and 3 can never run:

// ...
  else if (i <= -1)     // <- can never be 'true'
    total += 0; 
  else if (j - 1 <= -1) // <- 'true' when 'j == 0'
// ...
  if (j - 1 <= -1)      // <- can never be 'true'
// ...

i is never going to be smaller than or equal to -1 and j likewise.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry it was ment to be 0..n and 0..m :D –  DoomStone Oct 13 '10 at 23:41
    
@DoomStone: Even if i may be 0 then still i <= -1 will never happen. If the conditions handle just some corner cases (single element) then you can write if (i == 0) ... to make it readable. –  Tomas Petricek Oct 14 '10 at 0:10
    
That is true, but it should have no impact on the result. –  DoomStone Oct 14 '10 at 0:23
1  
@DoomStone: Yes, it means the same thing, but the latter is much easier to follow. I still don't understand the logic behind your code and I believe that minor changes like this (and renaming and a few comments) would really help. –  Tomas Petricek Oct 14 '10 at 0:49

Some observations.

1) It would make your code much simpler (and less error prone) if you move count function from pseudo-code into a separate subroutine. Something like this (based on pseudo-code from your link)

func count(table, i, j)
  if ( i == 0 ) 
    return 1
  if ( i < 0 )
    return 0
  if ( j <= 0 and i >= 1 )
    return 0

  return table[i][j]
end

Then you can just do

table[i][j] = count(table, i, j - 1) + count(table, i - S[j], j)

in your inner loop.

2) In count2, your first loop will occur n - 1 times. It means, that for n == 1 you won't enter loop body and won't find any solutions. Same for the inner loop: if there's only one coin, you won't find any solutions.

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There was a miske in the code i gave you, it was to be 0 .. n and 0 .. m i have fixed the code in the first post –  DoomStone Oct 13 '10 at 23:50
    
@DoomStone Not to sound pedantic, but I really think getting rid of spagetti code in your inner loop will help you find a bug. –  Nikita Rybak Oct 14 '10 at 0:38
    
I have done this, but i still have the same problem –  DoomStone Oct 14 '10 at 0:40

I believe you mean for table[i, j] to store the number of ways to achieve a value of exactly i cents using only coins {0, 1, 2,..., j - 1}.

Essentially, the inner portion of the while loop is saying that table[i, j] should equal the number of ways of reaching a value of i without using any of coin j, plus the number of ways of achieving a value of i using at least one coin of value S[j]. Hence, except for border cases, the value is table[i, j - 1] + table[i - S[j], j]; the first part of the sum is the number of ways to reach i using no coins of value S[j], and the second part is the number of ways to reach i using at least one coin of value S[j].

Try changing:

        // second sub-problem
        // count(n-S[m], m)
        if (j - 1 <= -1) // rule 3
            total += 0;
        else if (i - S[j - 1] == 0) // rule 1
            total += 1;
        else if (i - S[j - 1] <= -1) // rule 2
            total += 0;
        else
            total += table[i - S[j-1], j];

to:

        // second sub-problem
        // count(n-S[m], m)
        if (i - S[j] == 0) // rule 1
            total += 1;
        else if (i - S[j] < 0) // rule 2
            total += 0;
        else
            total += table[i - S[j], j];

FYI, it is standard to write something like (j < 0) rather than (j <= -1).

share|improve this answer
    
If i change if (j - 1 <= -1) to if(j <= -1) will it get an out of bound error. –  DoomStone Oct 14 '10 at 0:28
    
it should be s[j-1] as S starts at 0 and go to m-1 –  DoomStone Oct 14 '10 at 0:29
    
I don't think you need that test anyway. See the edit. The variable j is never less than 0. –  jonderry Oct 14 '10 at 0:35
    
Yes j will be 0 for each i and then will j-1 = -1 –  DoomStone Oct 14 '10 at 0:38
    
That's why you need to change j - 1 to j. –  jonderry Oct 14 '10 at 0:41

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