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int x = 2;

x = rotateInt('L', x, 1); // should return 4

x = rotateInt('R', x, 3); // should return 64

Here is the code, can someone check it and let me know what the error is?

Compilation is successful, but it says Segmentation Fault when I execute it.

int rotateInt(char direction, unsigned int x, int y)
{
  int i;

  for(i = 0; i < y; i++)
  {  

    if(direction == 'R')
    {
       if((x & 1) == 1)
       {
         x = x >> 1;
         x = (x ^ 128);     
       }
       else    
         x = x >> 1;
     }
     else if(direction == 'L')
     {
       if((x & 128) == 1)  
       {
         x = x << 1;
         x = (x ^ 1);     
       }  
       else
       x = x << 1;
     }
   }
   return x;   
 }
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3  
If you're done with your related question from 10 min ago stackoverflow.com/questions/3928659/… you might want to accept an answer before moving on. –  Dusty Oct 14 '10 at 0:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I tried on my computer (MacBookPro / Core2Duo) and it worked. By the way, what's your target architecture ? Some (many) processors perform rotation instead of shifts when you use the C operators ">>" and "<<".

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i do this program on a linux machine, which is run by my instructor.. –  Tim Oct 14 '10 at 0:35
    
OK, so I asmume it is an Intel Machine, which does not rotate (at least it is not the case of ny Intel Core2Duo). However it masks the argument with 0xff in the case of integer rotation (i.e. "0xff00 >> 16 = 0" but "0xff00 >> 40 = 0xff"). –  Antoine Trouve Oct 14 '10 at 0:58
    
A compiler that did an actual bit rotation rather than a pure shift for the << and >> operators would be non-compliant. I don't see any wiggle-room in the definitions of the operators. They are shifts and not rotates, and have been since the dawn of the language. See C99, section 6.5.7 where it says "The result of E1 << E2 is E1 left-shifted E2 bit positions; vacated bits are filled with zeros." It goes on to describe the boundaries of the defined behavior in gory detail. Right shifts are described similarly, but with slightly different boundaries. –  RBerteig Oct 14 '10 at 0:59
    
It is not a matter of compiler, but processor. For instance PowerPC's shift instruction does rotation. –  Antoine Trouve Oct 14 '10 at 1:01
1  
@Antoine, rotation is simply not allowed as the implementation of the << operator. The language of the standard is extremely clear. It goes on to say that E1<<E2 is equivalent to multiplication by a power of 2, as long as the values are in bounds. It is also clear that shifting by a zero or negative amount is UB, as is shifting by more than the bits in the integral type. –  RBerteig Oct 14 '10 at 1:05

Start honing your debugging skills now. If you are going to be any form of an engineer, you'll need to write programs of some variety, and will thus be debugging all of your life.

A simple way to start debugging is to put print statements in to see how far your code makes it before it dies. I recommend you start by isolating the error.

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it prints nothing but segmentation fault, that is it. –  Tim Oct 14 '10 at 0:40
    
That mens it's crashing before your first print statement. Move the print statement earlier and retry. Repeat until you know which line is causing the segfault –  Josh Oct 14 '10 at 0:49
1  
@Josh that's exactly what I was going to say, thanks. Don't forget to put a \n in your printf statement to flush the stream. –  San Jacinto Oct 14 '10 at 0:51
    
Yeah, this is good advice @San! –  Josh Oct 14 '10 at 0:53
    
@Josh thank you , that is really helping. –  Tim Oct 14 '10 at 0:56

Not sure about the seg fault, but I think

if((x & 128) == 1)  

should be

if((x & 128) == 128)

or just

if(x & 128)  
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When you use ^ don't you mean the or operator | ?

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