Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The below code works both under Python 2.6 and 3.1, but the third lambda of SomeObject.columns is a bit silly, serving no real purpose but to prevent the reference to SomeObject.helper_function from being looked at before the class declaration finishes. It seems like a hack. If I remove the lambda, and replace it with just SomeObject.helper_function, I get NameError: name 'SomeObject' is not defined. Am I missing a better non-hacky way?

class SomeObject:
  def __init__(self, values):
    self.values = values

  @staticmethod
  def helper_function(row):
    # do something fancy here
    return str(len(row))

  columns = [
    (lambda x: x['type'], 'Type'),
    (lambda x: 'http://localhost/view?id=%s' % x['id'], 'Link'),
    (lambda x: SomeObject.helper_function(x), 'Data'),
    ]

  def render_table_head(self):
    print('\t'.join([c[1] for c in self.columns]))

  def render_table_body(self):
    for row in self.values:
      print('\t'.join([col[0](row) for col in self.columns]))
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's no way to refer to the class that's currently being defined. There should really be keywords referring to the current scope, eg. __this_class__ for the innermost class being defined and __this_func__ for the innermost function, so classes and functions can cleanly refer to themselves without having to repeat their name.

You could move the definition of columns out of the class body:

class SomeObject:
    def __init__(self, values):
        self.values = values
    ...

SomeObject.columns = [
    (lambda x: x['type'], 'Type'),
    (lambda x: 'http://localhost/view?id=%s' % x['id'], 'Link'),
    (SomeObject.helper_function, 'Data'),
]

By the way, please always use at least 4-space indentation. Anything less is very hard to read.

share|improve this answer
    
FWIW, I've never had problems referring to the function being defined by name. The code doesn't actually run until the name is defined. Am I missing something? –  aaronasterling Oct 14 '10 at 3:06
    
@Aaron: That doesn't give you the function itself, it gives you whatever happens to be bound to that name; for example, that's different if the function is decorated, or if the containing scope changes it for some other reason. Generally that's what you want anyway, but I think that you should be able to get a reference to "this object" in the general case, without having to "look yourself up" by name. –  Glenn Maynard Oct 14 '10 at 3:15
    
Yeah, I've noticed the lack of those kinds of keywords before, but I'd assumed my desire for them was a product of C/C++ tainted mind, and managed to find perfectly good, elegant alternatives. This is the first time it seemed like there weren't any. –  John Dough Oct 14 '10 at 3:29
add comment

Why not populate columns in init() and use self?

def __init__(self, values):
    self.values = values
    self.columns = [
        (lambda x: x['type'], 'Type'),
        (lambda x: 'http://localhost/view?id=%s' % x['id'], 'Link'),
        (self.helper_function, 'Data'),
    ]
share|improve this answer
3  
Those are instance variables, not class variables. –  Glenn Maynard Oct 14 '10 at 2:37
add comment

This works. It goes against all of my sensibilities.

class SomeObject:
  def __init__(self, values):
    self.values = values

  def helper_function(row):
    # do something fancy here
    return str(len(row))

  columns = [
    (lambda x: x['type'], 'Type'),
    (lambda x: 'http://localhost/view?id=%s' % x['id'], 'Link'),
    (helper_function, 'Data'),
    ]

  def render_table_head(self):
    print('\t'.join([c[1] for c in self.columns]))

  def render_table_body(self):
    for row in self.values:
      print('\t'.join([col[0](row) for col in self.columns]))


if __name__ == '__main__':
    print "foo"

    o = SomeObject([{'type':'type100', 'id':'myId'}, {'type':'type200', 'id':'myId2'}])
    o.render_table_body()
share|improve this answer
    
How did you think of that? Its perverse, but in a very subtle way. Its surprising to me that having a self-less classmethod can actually work out! –  John Dough Oct 14 '10 at 3:19
    
I threw your code into pycharm and just started trying stuff. At first I wanted to reproduce your findings. Then I was trying to avoid putting the code into init. And I concur, it is perverse! –  kevpie Oct 14 '10 at 3:35
add comment

You can directly refer to the static function through

(helper_function.__func__, 'Data'),

without having to change anything else in your code. helper_function is of type staticmethod, and __func__ gives access to the underlying function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.