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I am trying to solve the readers-writers problem with writer preference in Java using multi-threading. The following is a stripped down version of what my code does. Will it work?

public PriorityQueue<myClass> pq;
public void foo(){
    myClass obj = new myClass();
    pq.add(obj);
    obj.wait();
    //Actual code
}
public void bar(){
    pq.remove().notify();
}

Assume that the priority queue pq is empty initially and the constructor of the enclosing class calls the constructor of pq. Also, foo is called first and then bar. So when foo is called, it adds obj to the queue and that becomes the front element so that when the remove is called in bar that is the element that is removed. My question is, will "Actual code" be executed? Or am I performing wait() and notify() on two completely different objects? If so, how can I fix it?

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Can you say more about what you want to happen? What do you mean by "writer preference," specifically in the context of the example code? Presumably foo() and bar() are called from different threads... and you want foo() to enqueue an object, then block until bar() dequeues it? Why? –  andersoj Oct 15 '10 at 4:44
    
Also, how is this related to the very similar question here stackoverflow.com/questions/3938606/… ? –  andersoj Oct 15 '10 at 5:18
    
It is the same question. I had waited for about 10-12 hours and no one seemed to respond so I assumed that the question was way down the list for anyone to take notice again and that's why I posted the question once more. –  Anand Oct 17 '10 at 9:28
    
@andersoj: I had to write the policies for writer preference. I couldn't use notifyAll() because of that. It goes like this: two queues, one each for waiting readers and writers. Queues are of a custom RequestObject type which contain an integer stating the priority of the request. Only one thread waits on each request object so I can actually choose which thread I can release on completion of a thread execution rather than leaving it to the mercy of Java to decide. My error was that I didn't put a synchronized(obj) around the wait and a similar synchronized for the notify. –  Anand Oct 17 '10 at 9:37

2 Answers 2

You should note that PriorityQueue is not thread safe... i.e. if foo and/or bar is called concurrently they may irreparably break pq's internal state.

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Assume that I use PriorityBlockingQueue. My problem is still not solved. –  Anand Oct 14 '10 at 5:08

I'm still trying to parse your question, and so far what I can extract is that you want to implement a priority queue for myClass that exhibits writer preference. Java's off-the-shelf locks don't offer strict writer preference, but if you are OK (and it's probably best) with approximate writer preference, you can use a normal ReentrantReadWriteLock in fair mode.

Having written all this (and thought about the many ways it could go wrong) I really wonder why the java.util.concurrent implementation of PriorityBlockingQueue doesn't meet your need.

The following code is far from tested, but passes my 1:00AM sniff test.

private final PriorityQueue<myClass> pq = ...;
// associated RW lock, in fair mode (==true)
private final ReadWriteLock pqLock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock(true);    
private final Condition pqWriteCondition = pqLock.writeLock().newCondition();    

public void produceNew()
{
    myClass obj = new myClass();
    pqLock.writeLock.lock();
    try { 
      pq.offer(obj);
      pqWriteCondition.notifyAll();
    } finally {
      pqLock.writeLock.unlock();
    } 
    //Actual code
}

public void consumeFirst() {
    myClass consume = null;
    pqLock.readLock.lock();
    try { 
      consume = pq.poll();
      while (consume == null) {
        pqWriteCondition.wait();
        consume = pq.poll();
      }
    } finally {
      pqLock.readLock.unlock();
    } 
    //Actual code

}
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My code wasn't working because I wasn't using a synchronized block on the proper objects while performing waits and notifies. Your code, I believe, will suffer from something similar. –  Anand Oct 17 '10 at 9:34
    
Interesting... not that I've tested this carefully, but it's similar to code I have used in production. Usually for an object protected by a read/write lock, a write-lock condition is the correct place to do this. Did you look at the RWLock API? –  andersoj Oct 17 '10 at 11:52
    
Also, if you're not using j.u.concurrent Locks and Conditions, but instead bare java monitors w/ wait() and notify(), there's a related question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3903039/… –  andersoj Oct 17 '10 at 11:54
    
@Meher, oh I see what you're seeing. No, wait() and notify() work differently on instances of Condition, which override the Object.wait() default implementations. No synchronized is required, but you do need to .lock() the appropriate Lock as I have done. –  andersoj Oct 17 '10 at 12:30

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